Hundreds of bodies from New York virus surge still stored in freezer trucks

Hundreds of bodies remain in storage in freezer trucks in New York months after their deaths during the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic in the spring, The Wall Street Journal reported.



a man riding on the back of a truck: Hundreds of bodies from New York virus surge still stored in freezer trucks


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Hundreds of bodies from New York virus surge still stored in freezer trucks

City officials told the Journal that there are about 650 bodies in storage on the 39th Street Pier in Brooklyn’s Sunset Park. The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner said the bodies are largely those of people who could not afford a burial or whose next of kin could not be located.

Such bodies would ordinarily have been buried on Hart Island, according to the newspaper, but Mayor Bill de Blasio (D) pledged in April that those burials would not occur during the coronavirus pandemic.

Some 230 victims’ relatives have not yet been located, the chief medical examiners’ office said. Officials said relatives have not had the money to collect the bodies in other cases.

The city nearly doubled the burial subsidy it offers in May, the Journal noted, but the $1,700 offered is still far short of the $9,000 average cost for a traditional burial or the $6,500 cost of a service and cremation.

Dina Maniotis, the chief medical examiner’s office’s executive deputy commissioner, told the newspaper that while anyone has the right to request a free burial on Hart Island, numerous family members are not clear on their options.

“This has been traumatic,” she said. “We are working with them as gently as we can and coaxing them along to make their plans. Many of them will decide they want to go to Hart Island, which is fine.”

Aden Naka, the office’s deputy director of forensic investigations, added that the unit is only equipped to handle about 20 deaths per day, about one-tenth of those it was faced with at the height of the pandemic in the city.

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Police bust New York City party on Halloween; England to enter 4-week lockdown; virus top campaign issue

Multiple countries in Europe are again entering lockdowns as cases surge in the United States, propelling COVID-19 as a central campaign issue yet again in the presidential race.

Former Vice President Joe Biden says President Donald Trump has been unable to control the pandemic: “We’re gonna beat this virus and get it under control and the first step to doing that is beating Donald Trump,” Biden said.

Meanwhile, Trump continues to minimize the virus’ impact. Trump told Pennsylvania voters that his administration has done “an incredible job” dealing with the pandemic. He repeated a months-old promise that the mass distribution of a vaccine was “just weeks away.”

Daily infections are at an all-time high in the U.S. heading into Tuesday’s election, according to Johns Hopkins University.

📈 Today’s numbers: The U.S. has reported more than 9 million cases and more than 230,000 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University data. The global totals: 45 million cases and 1.19 million deaths.

🗺️ Mapping coronavirus: Track the U.S. outbreak in your state.

This file will be updated throughout the day. For updates in your inbox, subscribe to The Daily Briefing newsletter.

Police bust New York City party with nearly 400 people on Halloween

Police charged nine organizers in a bust of an “illegal bar/party” that had nearly 400 people in attendance in New York City, the NYC sheriff announced Saturday.

Police shut down the gathering held inside a Brooklyn warehouse early in the morning on Halloween.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Saturday warned against Halloween gatherings that increase the risk of transmitting COVID-19, tweeting “Halloween should be spooky, not scary.”

The guidelines tweeted by Cuomo say parties are particularly risky because they can bring together people from different areas for a long period of time.

— Joel Shannon

British PM announces new, four-week lockdown in England

British prime minister Boris Johnson announced plans Saturday for a four-week national lockdown in England starting this week that will shut pubs, restaurants, entertainment facilities and nonessential businesses.

Schools, universities and manufacturing facilities will remain open during the period from Thursday until Dec. 2.

“Unless we act, we could see deaths in this country running at several thousand a day,” Johnson said.

Johnson said that individuals will only be allowed to leave their homes for specific reasons like medical appointments, shopping for essentials, education and work that cannot be done from their residence.

“No one wants to be imposing these kinds of measures anywhere,” the prime minister said, but added that “no responsible prime minister can ignore” the rising number of COVID-19 cases.

Professor Chris Whitty, chief medical officer for England, told reporters at a news conference that England is experiencing 50,000 new cases daily and that the figure is rising.

Doctors groups rip Trump for touting baseless conspiracy over virus death count

Medical groups are slamming President Donald Trump for resurfacing a baseless conspiracy on campaign stops that doctors are inflating the number of COVID-19 deaths in the USA in order to drive

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Travelers to New York must test negative before and after they arrive

  • New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Saturday announced new measures to combat the spread of COVID-19 in the state of New York.
  • Those traveling to the state will need to test negative for the disease within three days of their trip and quarantine immediately upon entering. 
  • After three days, that traveler must also get a second test for COVID-19, and if it is negative, they will be permitted to cease quarantining, the state announced.
  • New Yorkers who are leaving the state for less than 24 hours do not need to obtain a test before returning to the state but must be tested within four days of returning to the state.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced on Saturday a new travel mandate for people who come to the state. 

Under the new rules, if an individual is traveling to New York, they must test negative for COVID-19 within three days of making their trip, the governor’s office said. Once they arrive in New York, they must quarantine for a three-day period before receiving an additional test for the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. 

If the results of the second COVID-19 test are also negative, a person is permitted to end their period of quarantine. If an individual is traveling from New York to another state for a period fewer than 24 hours, they do not need to be tested before returning but must get tested within four days of returning to New York.

The Saturday announcement replaces a previous policy that required individuals to quarantine for a two-week period if they were coming to the state from a list of more than 40 states that did not meet criteria set by state officials. 

The change comes as the US deals with the latest wave of COVID-19 cases. On Friday, the US reported nearly 100,000 new cases of the virus: shattering the record for the most cases reported in a single day since the pandemic began.

 

While President Donald Trump has continued to blame the increase on an increase in testing for the disease, The COVID Tracking Project reported that the number of positive cases was rising more sharply than the number of tests administered, according to a previous Business Insider report.

While the state of New York saw the most severe outbreak of COVID-19 nationally, it was able to stem the spread of the virus in the spring and summer months. But as temperatures cool and cases spike across the US, cases in New York have also begun to rise.

The positive rate in the state over the past week is about 1.5% over the past week, according to data analyzed by Johns Hopkins University. While that’s lower than the 6.4% rate nationally over the past seven days, it’s higher than the end of summer when the rate in New York dipped below 1%. 

In “focus zones” — areas of the state where officials are

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The New York Academy Of Medicine Welcomes New Board Chair Dr. Wayne Riley, President Of SUNY …

New York, NY, Oct. 21, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM) and SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University jointly announced Wayne J. Riley, MD, MPH, MBA, MACP, as Chair of NYAM’s Board of Trustees. Dr. Riley is the 17th president of the Brooklyn-based SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University, where he also holds tenured professorships in internal medicine, health policy, and management. Dr. Riley joined the NYAM Board of Trustees in 2017.  

He is the first African American to lead the organization’s board as he succeeds James Flynn, MS, President, Deerfield Management Company LP.

With nearly 175 years of leadership in medical science, advocacy to improve medicine, public health, and disparities in healthcare, NYAM’s mission to attain health equity in pursuit of a healthier New York—and the world—has never been more vital. The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare the inequities—furthered by a 400-year legacy of systemic racism—that have created poor health outcomes for millions, many in communities of color. NYAM is responding to this public health crisis with the passion and unique know-how of its longstanding institutional expertise, as well as a commitment to addressing social justice issues to reach health equity. 

Since joining the NYAM board, Dr. Riley’s guidance and leadership have significantly impacted NYAM’s strategic plans, including its new  Action Agenda for Health Equity. Fueled by the current state of health inequities, Dr. Riley’s ongoing contributions and leadership of the Board of NYAM and its partnership with the executive leadership will help lay the groundwork to improve the health and well-being of New Yorkers in the years to come. 

“Dr. Riley’s leadership of the NYAM’s Board of Trustees will enhance and enrich NYAM’s perspectives in our pursuit of disrupting common thinking patterns, changing systems and bolstering the influence of our work to result in meaningful change,” said NYAM President Dr. Judith A. Salerno, MD, MS. “We are fortunate to benefit from his wealth of experience as a top physician, educator, and administrator, and I can think of no one better to head our Board as we continue to pursue our vision of a world where everyone has the opportunity to live a healthy life.”

“I am honored to assume the role of Chairman of the Board of The New York Academy of Medicine,” said Dr. Riley. “At this critical time in New York and our nation, while we deal with a global pandemic, unjustifiable and worrisome distrust of medicine and science, social justice matters, systemic racism, and persistent health disparities—all of which significantly impact communities of color—understanding the intersectionality of where these variables meet begs for viable solutions, and systematic, positive outcomes. NYAM’s voice, advocacy, and leadership remain critically important in affecting positive change, and I look forward to the work we will continue to engage in as a Board and an organization.”

 “We are pleased to congratulate Dr. Riley on his historic appointment as Chairman of NYAM’s Board of Trustees,” said Dr. Steven J. Corwin, president, and CEO of NewYork-Presbyterian. “Dr. Riley is

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The New York Academy Of Medicine Welcomes New Board Chair Dr. Wayne Riley, President Of SUNY Downstate

Historic moment as a 173-year-old institution dedicated to medicine, public health, and health equity elects first Black physician as Chair of its Board of Trustees.

New York, NY, Oct. 21, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM) and SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University jointly announced Wayne J. Riley, MD, MPH, MBA, MACP, as Chair of NYAM’s Board of Trustees. Dr. Riley is the 17th president of the Brooklyn-based SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University, where he also holds tenured professorships in internal medicine, health policy, and management. Dr. Riley joined the NYAM Board of Trustees in 2017.  

He is the first African American to lead the organization’s board as he succeeds James Flynn, MS, President, Deerfield Management Company LP.

With nearly 175 years of leadership in medical science, advocacy to improve medicine, public health, and disparities in healthcare, NYAM’s mission to attain health equity in pursuit of a healthier New York—and the world—has never been more vital. The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare the inequities—furthered by a 400-year legacy of systemic racism—that have created poor health outcomes for millions, many in communities of color. NYAM is responding to this public health crisis with the passion and unique know-how of its longstanding institutional expertise, as well as a commitment to addressing social justice issues to reach health equity. 

Since joining the NYAM board, Dr. Riley’s guidance and leadership have significantly impacted NYAM’s strategic plans, including its new Action Agenda for Health Equity. Fueled by the current state of health inequities, Dr. Riley’s ongoing contributions and leadership of the Board of NYAM and its partnership with the executive leadership will help lay the groundwork to improve the health and well-being of New Yorkers in the years to come. 

“Dr. Riley’s leadership of the NYAM’s Board of Trustees will enhance and enrich NYAM’s perspectives in our pursuit of disrupting common thinking patterns, changing systems and bolstering the influence of our work to result in meaningful change,” said NYAM President Dr. Judith A. Salerno, MD, MS. “We are fortunate to benefit from his wealth of experience as a top physician, educator, and administrator, and I can think of no one better to head our Board as we continue to pursue our vision of a world where everyone has the opportunity to live a healthy life.”

“I am honored to assume the role of Chairman of the Board of The New York Academy of Medicine,” said Dr. Riley. “At this critical time in New York and our nation, while we deal with a global pandemic, unjustifiable and worrisome distrust of medicine and science, social justice matters, systemic racism, and persistent health disparities—all of which significantly impact communities of color—understanding the intersectionality of where these variables meet begs for viable solutions, and systematic, positive outcomes. NYAM’s voice, advocacy, and leadership remain critically important in affecting positive change, and I look forward to the work we will continue to engage in as a Board and an organization.”

 “We

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Reopened Schools in New York City Not Seeing COVID Case Spikes | Health News

By Robin Foster and E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporters

(HealthDay)

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Three weeks after becoming the first big urban area to reopen public schools since the pandemic began, New York City is not seeing a feared surge in cases among students and staff.

Instead, health officials are seeing a surprisingly small number of COVID-19 cases, The New York Times reported.

Of 15,111 staff members and students tested randomly in the first week of its testing regimen, the city has gotten back results for 10,676. There were only 18 positives: 13 staff members and five students, the Times reported. Even better, when officials put mobile testing units at schools near the Brooklyn and Queens neighborhoods that have had new outbreaks, only four positive cases surfaced in more than 3,300 tests conducted since the last week of September, the newspaper said.

New York City is facing fears of a second wave of the virus fueled by local spikes in Brooklyn and Queens, and official have closed more than 120 public schools as a precaution, the Times reported.

Still, the sprawling system of 1,800 public schools is a bright spot as the city tries to recover from a pandemic that has killed more than 20,000 people and severely weakened its economy.

When the city reopened its school system in September, roughly half of the city’s students opted for hybrid learning, where they are in the building some days, but not others. The approach has enabled the city to keep class sizes small, the Times reported.

“That data is encouraging,” said Paula White, executive director of Educators for Excellence, a teachers group. “It reinforces what we have heard about schools not being super spreaders.”

Things are not going as well in other parts of the country, however. Last week, at least 20 states set record seven-day averages for infections, and a dozen hit record hospitalization rates, according to health department data analyzed by the Washington Post.

The jump in cases and hospitalizations has been followed by a more modest rise in COVID-19 deaths, most likely due to better patient care from now-seasoned medical workers. The widespread use of powerful steroids and other treatments has also lowered mortality rates among people who are severely ill, the Post reported.

Still, experts caution that most Americans remain vulnerable to COVID infection and the virus will likely spread more easily as colder weather sends more people indoors, where they might be exposed to larger amounts of the virus in poorly ventilated spaces.

“Inevitably, we’re moving into a phase where there’s going to need to be restrictions again,” David Rubin, director of PolicyLab at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, told the Post.

Second COVID vaccine trial paused

A second coronavirus vaccine trial has been paused after an unexplained illness surfaced in one of the trial’s volunteers.

Johnson & Johnson, which only began a phase 3 trial of its vaccine last month, did not offer any more details on the illness and did not

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Healthcare Workers, High-Risk People Will Get Priority for COVID-19 Vaccine in New York: Governor | Top News

NEW YORK (Reuters) – New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said on Sunday that healthcare workers and high-risk populations, including some long-term care residents, would get priority in his state to receive a COVID-19 vaccine when one is approved and available.

According to the five-phase preliminary plan for New York’s vaccine administration program, some details of which Cuomo announced at a news briefing, healthcare workers in patient-care settings, long-term care facility workers and some long-term care residents would be among the first to receive a vaccine.

In the second phase of vaccine rollout, first responders, school staff, other public-facing frontline workers and people whose health conditions put them at extreme risk would get priority for the vaccine.

In Phase 3, it would be administered to people over 65. All remaining essential workers would receive the vaccine in a fourth phase, and healthy adults and children would receive it in a fifth phase.

Prioritization would also vary by geographic location based on the prevalence of the virus, Cuomo said.

“This is a larger operational undertaking, I would argue, than anything we have done during COVID to date,” he told reporters.

The program will likely seek to deliver some 40 million doses of a vaccine to state residents, as New York’s population is around 20 million and the vaccines in development may require two doses to be effective, Cuomo said.

He said the state had sent the drafted plan to the federal government, along with questions on what funding the federal government would provide for the effort.

“States cannot do this on their own,” he said.

A New York state task force will carry out its own review of coronavirus vaccines authorized or approved by the federal government due to concerns of politicization of the approval process, according to Cuomo, a Democrat who has blasted President Donald Trump’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

“I think that will give people added surety in the vaccine,” Cuomo said on Sunday.

(Reporting by Gabriella Borter in New York; Editing by Matthew Lewis)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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Covid-19 News: Live Updates – The New York Times

Here’s what you need to know:

Credit…Tailyr Irvine for The New York Times

The Mountain West, which for months avoided the worst of the pandemic, has rapidly devolved into one of the most alarming hot spots in the United States, which recorded its eight millionth confirmed case on Thursday.

Seventeen states, including many in the Mountain West, have added more cases in the past week than any other week of the pandemic. And the spread through sparsely populated areas of rural America has created problems in small towns that lack critical resources — including doctors — even in ordinary times.

Wyoming, which did not have 1,000 total cases until June, recently added more than 1,000 in a single week. Reports of new infections have recently reached record levels in Alaska, Colorado and Idaho. And Montana, where more than half of the state’s cases have been announced since August, is averaging more than 500 cases per day.

One place where the infections have spread has been local jails, which are confined, often crowded spaces. They are risky venues for inmates and workers, but the short-term holding facilities also pose a threat for surrounding communities because people filter in and out of them constantly.

For months, the jail in central Montana’s Cascade County was free of the coronavirus, which seemed as distant a threat as it did in much of the rural Mountain West.

Then a few people who had the virus were arrested. By the time Paul Krogue, the jail’s medical director, realized there was a problem, nearly 50 inmates were infected. After weeks battling to contain the outbreak, Mr. Krogue got a call that infections were spreading to a side of the jail that had been virus-free.

“I just kind of lost it, like, ‘My God, I don’t know how much longer I can do this,’” Mr. Krogue, a nurse practitioner, recalled. “I was just scared that I’m not going to be able to see it through, that I’m going to get sick — you just feel so exhausted and it’s just a lot.”

Now more than 300 inmates and staff members have been infected in a facility meant to hold 365 people, Cascade County’s first major outbreak in a region where the virus is suddenly surging.

Credit…Jeenah Moon/Getty Images

Pfizer’s chief executive said on Friday that the company would not apply for emergency authorization of its coronavirus vaccine before the third week of November, ruling out President Trump’s assertion that a vaccine would be ready before Election Day on Nov. 3.

In a statement posted to the company website, the chief executive, Dr. Albert Bourla, said that although Pfizer could have preliminary numbers by the end of October about whether the vaccine works, it would still need to collect safety and manufacturing data that would stretch the

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Cosmetic Dentist New York Eliminates Any Dental Defects

Cosmetic dentist is one who can help you to get a beautiful smile. Looking good and attractive can help you to get success in their life. It is said that a beautiful smile can make your day, your smile is priceless and you should do every possible thing to get make it perfect. Today, cosmetic dentist has many new and advanced technologies that can make your teeth and gums healthy. The ailments related to teeth can turn out to be serious and for this an individual can visit a cosmetic dentist New York. This dentist can remove any kind of dental ailments. Cosmetic dentistry is a branch of dentistry that happens to give you a beautiful smile using porcelain veneers, bridges, crowns, dental implants, restorative dentistry, and teeth whitening, and bonding technologies. All these are part of dentistry that can remove any kind of dental problems.

If you are reside in city of New York, then you can get any kind of dental problem solved by the help of qualified cosmetic dentist. The cosmetic dentist New York has all kinds of solutions for you whether it is worn teeth or misaligned or dental pain. Invisalign braces, teeth whitening process, clear braces and tooth contouring are also a type resolution to cure your dental defects. Tooth contouring is a treatment which is used to cure worn edges of your teeth. While teeth whitening system is a common treatment in which bleach is used that contains a particular amount of peroxide to make your teeth shine. Tooth is a very important part of our body and we are ready to bear any kind of expense to remove it.

An Invisalign brace is a type of treatment where braces are used to correct the alignment of your teeth. Earlier the dentist were using metal braces for the making the teeth in proper alignment but today new technology has evolved and this has made dental ailments less panic and relaxing. Many people get scared of all those panics and other things that are associated with treatment. But today, you can smartly visit dentist to get the treatment that you want. Due to these demand, it has given rise to invisalign treatment which has become very successful among the patients. The advantage of using this treatment is that the braces are invisible to others.

Another important and popular treatment in cosmetic world is veneers. A cosmetic dentist is an experienced professional that can undertake any kind of dental problem.Basically, there are two types of treatments in veneers, one is composite and other is porcelain. A dentist can efficiently treat any kind of veneer. Composite veneer is placed either directly or indirectly by a cosmetic dentist on your tooth, and afterwards bonded to the tooth by the help of bonding agent like resin cement. Porcelain veneer can be indirectly fabricated on your teeth. In this process, either the front face or the biting edge of the teeth is slightly removed by the dentist and then, the …

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