Why You Shouldn’t Set New Year’s Fitness Resolutions

NY running goals

I wish I could say that I’m immune to the allure of setting New Year’s resolutions. But I think just about as long as I can remember, I’ve set some kind of goal come the first week of January. And like so many who make a list of wishes and goals, I set at least one fitness-related resolution.

For the last five years or so, one of these goals (if not more) has been centered around running: run a 10K, then a half marathon, then a full marathon, then get faster, qualify for international races — the list goes on. Some of these goals I’ve attained, others I haven’t. But as the year ends and it comes dangerously close to the time to make new goals, I find myself less than enthusiastic about setting any fitness goals — namely running goals — for 2021.

There’s, of course, the practical reason: we simply don’t know what will happen in the coming months, so setting goals tied to organized racing seems impractical. But beyond that, there’s the mental weight of it all. Typically, setting my New Year’s fitness goals is fun for me. I’ve spent a whole year working toward my goals and I’ll spend the next working toward the new ones.

However, I’ve learned to adjust to canceled races, a fully remote work life that’s caused me to adapt my home into a fitness studio, a living space, and an office, and socially distanced runs where I actively try to avoid others — not to mention a forced training break. I’m not the same runner who sat down this time last year with a laundry list of boxes to check off. I’m not faster. In fact, I’m much, much slower. I didn’t run a single race this year — a first for me in eight years. I haven’t been able to tick off any of my “big” goals for the sport.

I’m a runner that’s no longer motivated by setting PRs at races, collecting medals, and sub four-hour marathons. Sure, those will still be things that I strive for one day long in the future. But not now. Instead, I’m a runner who just misses her sport. Like so many, I’ve had to take a break from the thing I love. While there have been some highs (no one likes a 20-mile training run, trust me), there have also been some lows. Seeing what you love no longer look like it once did is hard. At first I thought it was just my training plans that were changing, but I soon realized that it was me who was really changing.

Running, in some capacity, will always be there for me if I seek it out. The way in which I enjoy my sport and the milestones that surround it may look different, but the consistency and mental clarity that lacing up my trainers and running gives me will always be there — with or without a marathon on the calendar.

And

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How has medicine changed in the past 20 years? A look at dementia, cancer care and chronic disease

The 21st century began with the first draft of the human genome, and with it, the promise of immense new powers to treat, prevent and cure disease.

In high-income countries like Australia, rates of heart disease were falling, and life expectancy was rising.

Over the past two decades, lots has changed about the factors that affect our health, wellbeing and how long (and well) we live.

So what do we know now that we didn’t then, and how far have we come?

As part of Radio National’s Big 20 series, Dr Norman Swan speaks to three leaders in their field to find out what’s happened in dementia research, cancer care and chronic disease over the last 20 years.

Chronic disease has been getting worse

Dr Norman Swan talks to Professor Chris Murray, director of the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington.

Dr Swan: Take us back to the year 2000. What was the pattern of disease?

Professor Chris Murray: In the year 2000, right before the big push globally on reducing health problems in low income settings, we were pretty much nearing the peak of the HIV epidemic and, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, we still had a very large number of deaths under age five — 12 million or so a year.

We hadn’t yet had the big efforts to control malaria. And many middle-income countries were right in that transition from a profile of disease burden dominated by infectious diseases and starting that shift towards cancer, heart disease, chronic kidney disease.

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Hear the full interviews with Dr Norman Swan on the Health Report podcast.

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In the high-income world — Australia, Europe, North America — the [disease burden] looked pretty similar. It was already heavily dominated by heart disease and cancer, chronic kidney disease, but there was less obesity back then, there was less diabetes, and we were still back in the heyday of heart disease coming down pretty rapidly.

Dr Swan: What has happened in the two decades since?

Professor Murray: We’ve seen really dramatic progress bringing down child death rates.

In a place like Niger in West Africa, the improvements are just spectacular. You’ve probably halved child death rates in that period … bringing [it] down below the 5 million mark because of antiretrovirals for HIV.

There has been real progress on controlling malaria because of bed-net programs. So just lots of progress racked up, until COVID, on a number of fronts in the low-income world.

Then at the other end of the spectrum in the high-income world, we’ve seen heart disease progress slow, and in some places reverse.

We’ve seen this steady rise of obesity and bringing with it diabetes, high blood sugar, bringing up blood pressure levels in some countries, despite all the therapies that exist for them.

In the middle-income world we’ve seen progress but we’ve seen the rise of ambient air pollution in the last two decades. It’s becoming a bigger and

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After 41 years of practice, Mendota Heights doctor finds renewed purpose in virtual medicine

Dr. Carolyn Borow has delivered more than 3,500 babies in her 41 years as a family doctor. But she hasn’t delivered one since the coronavirus pandemic began.

Instead Borow, like many medical professionals, has gone virtual, doing all those appointments about pregnancy complications, sore throats and COVID fears via computer and FaceTime. In fact, the only time she’s been in a hospital recently was when she herself had surgery.

“I am definitely going through baby withdrawal,” said Borow, who works out of Allina Health in West St. Paul and Eagan. “I’d never planned that at some point I’m not going to be doing this. Only a pandemic would keep me from it.”

At a time when a growing number of veteran doctors are suddenly considering retirement, Borow is finding renewed purpose in her work.

A 2020 survey of 2,300 U.S. physicians by the nonprofit Physicians Foundation reported that 37% of doctors said they would like to retire within a year. Many expressed fear for their personal health, including 28% who had “serious concerns” about catching COVID-19.

Borow, though, sees value in her shifting work experience.

“I thank everybody who is making these appointments,” Borow said. “Because it has allowed me to still feel meaningful. Because I had no intention ever of not continuing to serve people.”

Initially, to cut down on coronavirus exposure, Allina limited the number of its doctors going in and out of United Hospital in St. Paul, where Borow has worked. So, Allina hired doctors to serve full time in the hospital.

Secondly, because of her age and medical risks during the COVID crisis, Borow decided to curtail her in-person contact with patients. She went virtual on the fly.

“It was all new to me,” she said of distance doctoring. “But in my motivation to serve people, I just learned it quickly.”

Borow is as busy as ever. An empty nester with a retired husband, she dons her scrubs every morning — in the clinic, she used to wear streets clothes and a lab coat — and sits at an Allina-issued computer in her son’s old bedroom in their Mendota Heights home. Her two cats sometimes scratch at the door. But Borow is diligent and determined, officially working 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday (actually, two nights until 6) and on-call every other weekend. Of course, that doesn’t include the two or three hours every night of paperwork and the pre-shift prep for her appointments.

She also spends a half-day per week in the clinic signing forms, wearing a mask and shield over her glasses.

With a different virtual patient scheduled every 20 minutes, the doctor is much more punctual than in her days at the clinic, where an assistant could warn an impatient patient that the physician is running late.

“I have openings every day, people can get right in, which was never the case before,” Borow said. “Although before, we could work someone in with double booking.”

She’s now able to see patients

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Peter Andre works up a sweat in tiny vest as he launches his fitness channel after 34 years in the gym

PETER Andre has launched his first ever online fitness classes after 34 years of training in the gym.

The 47-year-old stripped off to a tiny vest as he revealed his new exciting venture called Get Fit With Peter Andre.

Peter Andre has launched his first ever series of online home workouts

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Peter Andre has launched his first ever series of online home workouts

A source exclusively told The Sun: “Peter has wanted to do something with health and fitness for such a long time and now tonight he’s launching his first fitness video!

“It’s free to subscribe so join in and start your fitness journey!”

The first video is a 10 minute HIIT workout that can easily be done at home without any equipment.

Speaking from his home gym, Peter tells fans: “It’s great to finally do this, I’ve been training since I was 13 years old, I’m 47 now.

Pete has always had an impressive physique and has been working out since he was 13

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Pete has always had an impressive physique and has been working out since he was 13Credit: Getty Images – Getty

“I’ve gone through so many different stages of training where I did all the weight training, watched everything I ate and was kind of bulky.

“Then I did the other ones where I was just cardio based and I was really shredded and then as time went on I found all the different things I liked – a combination of everything.

“What I want to do in these videos is show you all the different things you can do.

“So if you’re at home and you have no equipment I’m going to give you 10 minute little HIIT training.”

The first video is available to watch on Peter’s YouTube channel and there will be a new workout added every Monday.

Last week, Peter delighted fans by stripping naked to sing his hit Mysterious Girl in the shower.

He sizzled in a video shared with his 1.6 million Instagram followers – 25 years after he first released Mysterious Girl.

Peter Andre left fans swooning when he sang Mysterious Girl in the shower tonight

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Peter Andre left fans swooning when he sang Mysterious Girl in the shower tonight

Peter crooned the track from his second studio album, Natural, and showed off the incredible abs that helped make him famous.

He captioned the TikTok video: “They dared me to do it and I was like ‘hell yeah’ 🐠🏝🌴 #mysteriousgirl @tiktok #backtothemusic”

Fans didn’t complain, as Paddy McGuinness’s wife Christine commented: “Yeeessssss 👏😂”

Another said: “Excellent, loved that song 😊”

The 47-year-old released the track 25 years ago

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The 47-year-old released the track 25 years ago

Pete’s debut single Drive Me Crazy, released in 1992, peaked at number 72 in the Australian charts

But he became a huge hit when his tracks Mysterious Girl and Flava went global.

Peter reminded fans of his former glory last week, sharing a 90s throwback snap of himself when he was just 21-years-old.

Peter Andre took to his social media to share the picture with fans

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Peter Andre took to his social media to share the picture with fansCredit: Instagram/PeterAndre

In the snap a baby faced Pete can be seen rocking a bandana in his hair, an opened checkered shirt and a necklace hanging around his neck.

The

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LeAnn Rimes Proudly Shares Nude Photos as Her Psoriasis Returns for the First Time in 16 Years

Photo credit: Instagram
Photo credit: Instagram

From Prevention

  • LeAnn Rimes, 38, opened up about her journey with psoriasis in a new essay for Glamour.

  • The singer said that her skin condition flared for the first time in 16 years due to the “stress” of the pandemic and uncertainty that came with 2020.

  • Rimes is embracing her skin just the way it is.

LeAnn Rimes is not hiding her psoriasis anymore. In a new essay for Glamour, the singer opened up about her psoriasis diagnosis, and how the uncomfortable skin condition is flaring up for the first time 16 years due to the stress of the pandemic.

After attempting to hide her psoriasis for years, Rimes is embracing her skin the way it is. She shared the photos to Instagram in honor of World Psoriasis Day (October 29), writing in the caption that she’s ready to be honest about her experience with psoriasis. “And I want to give a voice to what so many other people are going through,” she said.

“You know when you say something you’ve been holding in for so long, and it’s such a sigh of relief? That’s what these photos are to me,” she said. “I needed this. My whole body—my mind, my spirit—needed this desperately.”

Fans flooded the post with messages of support. “I suddenly feel less ashamed of my psoriasis,” one fan wrote, while another person said, “You are so beautiful inside and out. I am always so amazed by you.”

In her essay with Glamour, Rimes shared that she was diagnosed with psoriasis when she was age two. “By the time I was six, about 80% of my body was covered in painful red spots—everything but my hands, feet, and face.

According to a recent review published in BMJ, nearly 3.4 million U.S. adults have psoriasis, and although the autoimmune disease can occur in children, it generally affects adults. The condition usually results in rashes, dryness, small bumps, and redness, but it can also cause joint stiffness, inflamed tendons, and mental health issues like depression.

“I tried everything I could to treat it: steroid creams, major medications—I even tried being wrapped in coal tar with Saran Wrap,” Rimes said, adding that she would also do everything in her power to hide it. “Onstage I’d often wear two pairs of pantyhose or jeans—even in 95-degree heat. Underneath my shirt, my whole stomach would be covered in thick scales that would hurt and bleed. For so much of my life, I felt like I had to hide.”

In her 20s, the singer discovered a treatment that kept her flare-ups at bay, and it wasn’t until this year that her bumps returned.

“All hell broke loose in the world—and inside of me, as I’m sure it did for so many other people amid this pandemic,” she said. “Stress is a common trigger for psoriasis, and with so much uncertainty happening, my flare-ups came right back.”

Rimes is not alone—many Americans are stressed in 2020.

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Study: Postpartum depression can linger for years for some women

Many women have depression symptoms after giving birth, but for some postpartum depression hangs on for years, a U.S. government study finds.

Of nearly 4,900 new mothers researchers followed, one-quarter had depression symptoms at some point in their child’s first three years. And for about half of them, the symptoms either started early on and never improved, or took time to emerge.

It all suggests women should be screened for postpartum depression over a longer period, said lead researcher Diane Putnick.

“Based on our data, I’d say screening could continue for two years,” said Putnick, a staff scientist at the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, in Bethesda, Md.

Right now, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends pediatricians take on the task of postpartum depression screening. It says they should screen mothers for symptoms at their baby’s routine check-ups during the first six months of life.

That’s both because postpartum depression usually arises in that period, and because babies have frequent check-ups during those months, according to Putnick. So pediatricians are, in a sense, best positioned to catch moms’ depression symptoms, she said.

On the other hand, pediatricians are also limited in what they can do. Mothers are not their patients, so they do not have access to medical records to get the bigger picture — including whether a woman has a history of clinical depression. And they can only suggest that mothers follow-up with their own provider.

“What happens after women are screened?” said Dr. Rahul Gupta, chief medical and health officer for the nonprofit March of Dimes.

“The recommendation is excellent,” he said, referring to the AAP advice to pediatricians. “It’s a great starting point.”

But women’s primary care doctors need to be involved, Gupta said, particularly since postpartum depression can persist, or surface relatively later after childbirth.

For the new study, published online this week in Pediatrics, Putnick’s team used data on 4,866 women in New York state. All took part in a research project on infertility treatment and its impact on child development.

During the study, mothers completed a five-question survey on depression symptoms when their baby was 4 months old, and then again when their child was 1, 2 and 3 years of age.

The study was done before the AAP recommendations came out, Putnick said, and it’s not clear what kind of screening or follow-up women might have gotten from their own providers.

Based on the study screening, new mothers followed four different trajectories: Three-quarters had few depressive symptoms throughout the three-year period; almost 13% had symptoms when their baby was 4 months old, but improved afterward; 8% initially had few symptoms, but developed more as their child grew older; and 4.5% had persistent depression symptoms.

Putnick stressed that the women only screened positive for symptoms. They were not diagnosed with clinical depression, and it’s unclear how many would need treatment, such as talk therapy or medication.

But the findings show that postpartum depression symptoms can be long-lasting, or arise relatively

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‘Obsessed’ patient Tom Baddeley who stalked dentist Ian Hutchinson with crossbow jailed for two years

A disgruntled patient who stalked his dentist with a crossbow, bleach, and plastic sheeting has been jailed for two years after breaking a restraining order against him.

Tom Baddeley, 42, was previously sentenced to prison in August for secretly following orthodontist Ian Hutchinson with a boot full of weapons capable of causing “serious harm” and logging his movements over a four-year period.

Cardiff Crown Court heard Baddeley developed an “obsession” with his dentist Dr Hutchinson while he was a patient of his between 2012- 2016 in Bristol.

They also heard that he made “bizarre” complaints about Dr Hutchinson during this period before their contact broke off.

Baddeley was first caught by police in November 2019 after a member of the public reported him acting suspiciously in his parked car – one of over 30 vehicles he bought to limit the chance he’d be recognised by Dr Hutchinson – near the orthodontist’s home in Monmouthshire.

Police found him wearing a balaclava and discovered a kit in his boot including a crossbow, a knife, a snood, gloves, a ski mask, bleach, plastic sheets, and cleansing wipes.

In his Bristol home the police found detailed surveillance logs of Dr Hutchinson’s movements spanning four years. They also found a “sinister” document counting down to something Baddeley referred to as “The Event”, of which the details to were never specified.

Baddeley was sentenced to 16 months in prison in August and handed an indefinite restraining order after he pleaded guilty to possession of an offensive weapon, possession of a bladed article, and stalking.

But on Thursday, the court heard he had in fact been released from custody the very same day he was sentenced because of the time he had spent on remand, unbeknownst to his victim.

Prosecutor Nigel Fryer said Baddeley was spotted approaching The Smile Lounge, one of Dr Hutchinson’s dental clinics in Chepstow, just two months later on October 7.

Baddeley was caught by officers riding a bicycle after being recognised by them despite wearing a baseball cap, a facemask and dark sunglasses.

Mr Fryer said: “It is not an understatement to say that this had a profound effect on Ian Hutchinson.”

Check crime reports in your area:

A victim impact statement read out in court heard Dr Hutchinson, 52, say he had been forced to change his lifestyle and routines in fear of being cornered by his stalker, and feared what Baddeley would have done to him.

He said: “I’d thought about what if he’d been able to get into the practice, what he would have done to the staff or any patients. This makes me feel upset.

“I have been a dentist for 30 years. This is not something I thought I would have to consider.”

He said the incident had also led to his long-term partner leaving him, with some of the reasons including not feeling safe within his home and potential reprisals from Baddeley.

“This has affected my mental health considerably. I have become very irritable and short-tempered.

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Dr. Fauci Says It May Be Years Before America Feels a ‘Semblance of Normality’ Again

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, told a Melbourne, Australia audience on Wednesday that it could be years before Americans are able to resume their lives normally amid the novel coronavirus pandemic.



a man holding his hand up to his mouth: Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at NIH testifies at a Senate Health, Education, and Labor and Pensions Committee on Capitol Hill. On Wednesday, Fauci said he believes it could be years before Americans can resume their lives normally.


© Graeme Jennings/Getty
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at NIH testifies at a Senate Health, Education, and Labor and Pensions Committee on Capitol Hill. On Wednesday, Fauci said he believes it could be years before Americans can resume their lives normally.

“I think it will be easily by the end of 2021 and perhaps into the next year before we start having some semblance of normality,” Fauci said during the University of Melbourne webinar.

“If normal means you can get people in a theatre without worrying about what we call congregate-setting super infections, if we can get restaurants to open almost at full capacity,” he added.

Fauci went on to explain that opening up the economy and maintaining public health safety is a “fine line” to walk.

“I firmly believe that you can continue to open to business [and] open up the country from an economic standpoint. But if you do that prudently with public health measures, that prevents surges of infection. We’ve seen it done before in countries and in sections of our own country,” he said.

The First Phase 3 Clinical Trial Of A Coronavirus Vaccine In The US Has Begun

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Fauci said that he believes a worldwide vaccine will be available within the next few months. However, a complicated mix of anti-vaccination beliefs and strong political divide could continue to make it difficult to contain the virus.

“Right now, there is a reluctance to take vaccines,” he said, adding that it was partly fueled by “mixed signals that are coming out from the government, that is not being very helpful.”

In a study conducted by CNBC/Change Research last month, only 42 percent of likely voters said they would probably or definitely get the vaccine when it is made available – a number that dropped 16 percentage points from July.

In addition to a vaccine, Fauci told the webinar that the development of antiviral drugs— which are being tested and studied in labs worldwide—could drastically shift the course of the pandemic by allowing patients to receive treatments as soon as they fall ill.

The infectious disease expert, who has been ridiculed by President Donald Trump over matters related to COVID-19, told the audience that experts should always be guided by science, and to not be afraid to stand up to politicians.

“You should always remember that in order to maintain your credibility, you should speak consistently based on the science. The science guides what we’re going to do and what we are doing,” he said.

Meanwhile, Fauci applauded Australia and New Zealand’s efforts to contain the virus, and said he wished the U.S. was on that same level.

“Australia is one of the countries that has done quite well. New

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Doctor goes clean-shaven for first time in 50 years

Dr Manoj Joshi, before and after. (SWNS)
Dr Manoj Joshi shaved his beard and moustache to raise funds for a polio. Here, before and after. (SWNS)

A doctor who shaved all his facial hair off for the first time in five decades to raise funds for a polio vaccine says his wife doesn’t recognise him.

While Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, had trimmed his beard before, he had not shaved his moustache since he was 16 years old.

Joshi’s wife said she she’d never seen him without facial hair before in the 42 years they had been married.

A member of Rotary International, a humanitarian service whose goal is to advance goodwill and peace around the world, Dr Joshi has been involved in what he calls “acts of giving” for his entire life.

Dr Manoj Joshi, before his shave. See SWNS story SWLEmoustache; A man who shaved his moustache to raise funds for a polio vaccine says his wife can’t even recognise him - after he trimmed it for the first time in 52 YEARS. Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, says he had never shaved his moustache ever since he could grow one as a fresh faced 16-year-old but decided to chop it all off in a bid to “eradicate polio”. But after he chopped it off his shocked wife said she couldn’t recognise him as she’d never seen him without it in the 42 years they had been married. The grandfather-of-two joked that it would take a lawn mower to trim his luscious facial hair - which is older than the invention of the mobile phone. Dr Joshi, a proud Rotarian, which is a worldwide charitable society with over a million members worldwide, has been involved in what he calls “acts of giving” for his entire life. On World Polio Day (Saturday, Oct 24) he took centre stage at a park in front of Bradford City Hall to shave off his beloved moustache in an “emotional day”.
Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, has not shaved since he was 16 years old but decided to chop it all off for the cause on World Polio Day. (SWNS)
Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, shaved his moustache for the first time in 52 YEARS at Bradford City Hall to raise funds to eradicate polio. See SWNS story SWLEmoustache; A man who shaved his moustache to raise funds for a polio vaccine says his wife can’t even recognise him - after he trimmed it for the first time in 52 YEARS. Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, says he had never shaved his moustache ever since he could grow one as a fresh faced 16-year-old but decided to chop it all off in a bid to “eradicate polio”. But after he chopped it off his shocked wife said she couldn’t recognise him as she’d never seen him without it in the 42 years they had been married. The grandfather-of-two joked that it would take a lawn mower to trim his luscious facial hair - which is older than the invention of the mobile phone. Dr Joshi, a proud Rotarian, which is a worldwide charitable society with over a million members worldwide, has been involved in what he calls “acts of giving” for his entire life. On World Polio Day (Saturday, Oct 24) he took centre stage at a park in front of Bradford City Hall to shave off his beloved moustache in an “emotional day”.
Dr Manoj Joshi took centre-stage at a park in front of Bradford City Hall to have his beard and moustache shaved off. (SWNS)

On Saturday, World Polio Day, he took centre-stage at a park in front of Bradford City Hall to shave off his beloved moustache.

He was nervous and said he’d miss his beard, which was painted purple as an homage to how immunised children had their little finger dyed purple.

When a child receives their polio drops on mass polio immunisation days, their little finger is painted with a purple dye so it is clear they have received the vaccine.

Watch: Wild Polio wiped out in Africa

Read more: Top scientist who battled COVID-19 says we will never live normally without vaccine

Dr Joshi, from Bradford, West Yorkshire, hopes to raise awareness and funds for the Rotary Foundation’s End Polio Now campaign – and has so far raised nearly £4,000.

He said: “It was such an emotional day for me because this cause means the world and if we can eradicate polio and make sure no child is at risk – it will be a great day.

“We are so close and I think we need to keep doing all we can to push over the final stretch.

“For me, it’s very strange to be without my moustache which I’ve had for 52 long years – but shaving it off is nothing compared to what we are fighting for.

Collect photo of Dr Manoj Joshi as a young man. See SWNS story SWLEmoustache; A man who shaved his moustache to raise funds for a polio vaccine says his wife can’t even recognise him - after he trimmed it for the first time in 52 YEARS. Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, says he had never shaved his moustache ever since he could grow one as a fresh faced 16-year-old but decided to chop it all off in a bid to “eradicate polio”. But after he chopped it off his shocked wife said she couldn’t recognise him as she’d never seen him without it in the 42 years they had been married. The grandfather-of-two joked that it would take a lawn mower to trim his luscious facial hair - which is older than the invention of the mobile phone. Dr Joshi, a proud Rotarian, which is a worldwide charitable society with over a million members worldwide, has been involved in what he calls “acts of giving” for his entire life. On World Polio Day (Saturday, Oct 24) he took centre stage at a park in front of Bradford City Hall to shave off his beloved moustache in an “emotional day”.
Dr Manoj Joshi as a young man. (SWNS)
Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, shaved his moustache for the first time in 52 YEARS at Bradford City Hall to raise funds to eradicate polio. See SWNS story SWLEmoustache; A man who shaved his moustache to raise funds for a polio vaccine says his wife can’t even recognise him - after he trimmed it for the first time in 52 YEARS. Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, says he had never shaved his moustache ever since he could grow one as a fresh faced 16-year-old but decided to chop it all off in a bid to “eradicate polio”. But after he chopped it off his shocked wife said she couldn’t recognise him as she’d never seen him without it in the 42 years they had been married. The grandfather-of-two joked that it would take a lawn mower to trim his luscious facial hair - which is older than the invention of the mobile phone. Dr Joshi, a proud Rotarian, which is a worldwide charitable society with over a million members worldwide, has been involved in what he calls “acts of giving” for his entire life. On World Polio Day (Saturday, Oct 24) he took centre stage at a park in front of Bradford City Hall to shave off his beloved moustache in an “emotional day”.
The 68-year-old says that his wife struggled to recognise him after going under the chop. (SWNS)

“The barber told me he would need a lawnmower to shave it all off – but thankfully he managed in just 30 minutes.

“It was light-hearted fun but there is a profound importance to this. These causes are so close to my heart.

“But I do feel very weird and strange now without my beard and moustache.

“You don’t normally keep something for half a century but my moustache has always been there.”

While there hasn’t been a case of polio caught

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Blocked by lobbyists for years, law puts more aides in N.J. nursing homes after 7,400 deaths

They feed, bathe and comfort residents of long-term care facilities, but the thousands of certified nursing aides who work in New Jersey’s nursing homes for little pay have said for years that their workload is often too much to handle.

On Friday, Gov. Phil Murphy signed a bill that will require operators beginning in early 2021 to increase the number of aides in each facility and for the first time set a ratio for the number of residents an aide is asked to handle.

The legislation had been vigorously blocked by industry lobbyists and some lawmakers for five years, but there was a renewed urgency to get the bill passed after the coronavirus pandemic claimed the lives of an estimated 7,400 long-term care residents in New Jersey — more than any other state based on population size.

Compliance will cost the industry $30 million or $5 a day per resident, according to the Health Care Association of New Jersey, a lobbying group for long-term care facilities.

CNA’s, who get paid an average of about $36,000 a year, have long complained they have more responsibilities than they can handle, especially on nights and weekends. The coronavirus outbreak sickened thousands of these workers and killed 121, according to state data, making the CNA shortage worse.

“Sadly, too many nursing homes are run by companies more interested in making money than protecting patients,” Murphy said in a statement after signing the bill Friday morning. “These long-sought reforms will help bring accountability to the industry and protect residents, staff, and family members with a loved one living in a long-term care facility. I am proud to have worked with our partners in organized labor, health care advocates, and legislative sponsors to finally implement safe staffing ratios in our nursing homes, as well as other long overdue reforms.”

The legislation, (S2712) will take effect in Feb. 1, and require long-term care facilities to abide by these staffing ratios:

* One CNA per 8 patients during the day shift;

* One direct care staff member — defined as a certified nurse assistant, a licensed practical nurse or a registered nurse — for every 10 residents during the evening shift, “provided that no fewer than half of all staff members are to be certified nurse aides, and each staff member will sign in to work as a certified nurse aide and will perform certified nurse aide duties,” according to bill;

* One direct care staffer for every 14 residents during the overnight shift, with the same rules that applied during the evening shift.

The law also creates a “Department of Labor and Workforce Development the Special Task Force on Direct Care Workforce Retention and Recruitment.” Long-term care facility operators have said they could not meet any worker-resident ratios without help retaining staff.

The law has been hailed as a victory for nursing home employees led, by 1199SEIU United Healthcare East, but it is a compromise since the union was seeking an even lower ratio of aides to

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