Amazon Sports Bra Top Will Get You Excited to Work Out in 2021

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We’ve officially reached the last lap of 2020, and we’re seriously looking forward to a clean slate. A new year always makes Us feel reinvigorated, inspired and ready for change. Of course, health and fitness goals are at the top of our New Year’s resolutions yet again!

But this year, we’re doing it differently — in fact, we’re getting a head start on our new routines in order to keep the momentum going all through the holiday season. To kick this wellness journey off properly, we’re prepping our gear now — which will include this amazing yoga top from Amazon!

AKAMC Women's Medium Support Cross Back Wirefree Removable Cups Yoga Sport Bra
AKAMC Women’s Medium Support Cross Back Wirefree Removable Cups Yoga Sport Bra Amazon

See it!

Get the AKAMC Women’s Medium Support Cross Back Wirefree Removable Cups Yoga Sport Bra for prices starting at $16, available at Amazon! Please note, prices are accurate at the date of publication, December 1, 2020, but are subject to change.

This top essentially does all of the work for you, as it combines a sports bra and shirt into one practical piece. It’s super form-fitting, which is ideal for any type of workout — be it low-impact yoga or HIIT training! The top half of this tank acts as your sports bra, complete with an elastic band and light padding for support. The cups are even removable if you don’t want the extra coverage! It also has ruching in the center of the chest, which can add some flattering shape to your look.

This top’s best features just may be the double criss-cross straps in the back. According to numerous reviewers, these straps are super stretchy and comfortable. While we’re particularly fond of the full-length version, you can scoop this top up in a smaller version that’s basically a traditional sports bra. It has the same sleek straps and fit without the added fabric on the lower half!

AKAMC Women's Medium Support Cross Back Wirefree Removable Cups Yoga Sport Bra
AKAMC Women’s Medium Support Cross Back Wirefree Removable Cups Yoga Sport Bra Amazon

See it!

Get the AKAMC Women’s Medium Support Cross Back Wirefree Removable Cups Yoga Sport Bra for prices starting at $16, available at Amazon! Please note, prices are accurate at the date of publication, December 1, 2020, but are subject to change.

Once the clock strikes midnight on January 1, we’re no longer playing games — that’s why stocking up on these tops is a must! Okay, so we may wait until morning before hitting the Peloton or firing up our Melissa Wood Health app — but you get it. New year, new gear — let’s do this!

See it: Get the AKAMC Women’s Medium Support Cross Back Wirefree Removable Cups Yoga Sport Bra for prices starting at $16, available at Amazon! Please note, prices are accurate at the date of publication, December 1, 2020, but are subject to change.

Not what you’re looking for? Check out more styles from AKAMC and shop all of the sports

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Work out with these active exercise titles



a woman sitting at a beach: The best fitness games for 2020 Work out with these active exercise titles image 1


© Provided by Pocket-lint
The best fitness games for 2020 Work out with these active exercise titles image 1

(Pocket-lint) – Videogames have long since moved past worries about inactivity and sedentary behaviour – while it’s true that many games will suck players into playing for hours at a time without much benefit to their physical wellbeing, the relaxation and enjoyment they offer is almost peerless.

  • Best dieting apps: 8 apps to help you lose weight at home

That said, there is still a range of games on the market that could scratch both itches, giving you fun gameplay and systems to interact with, while also getting your pulse pounding and helping you to keep active. Right now, given how many of us are spending large amounts of time at home, that could be the perfect combination.

So, to that end, we’ve gathered together some of the very best active videogames for you, so that you can get a burst of exercise without leaving your home, all with the help of your games console. 

Our pick of the best exercise games to buy or try today

Ring Fit Adventure

Nintendo’s latest fitness game, after the success of Wii Fit so many years ago, is an absolute sensation. It’s flown off the shelves, making it really difficult to find at the moment, but if you can spot it in stock anywhere it’s the perfect fitness title for the stay-at-home age. 

With the aid of flexible Ring-con controller and a leg strap, you’ll squat, stretch and flex your way through workouts masquerading as a quasi-RPG, and have a great time doing it. It’s beautifully designed and will help you get a bit fitter while monitoring your progress and encouraging you along the way.

Just Dance 2021

Another staple on the active gaming scene is the Just Dance series, which is available on the Switch, Xbox One and PS4. It’s a full-body rhythm action game, challenging you to dance along to a soundtrack full of popping tracks, matching your movements to the directions on-screen.

It’s a colourful, glorious bit of fun, and while it doesn’t have to be massively exerting if you play it concertedly and make sure to keep up the regularity of your sessions, it can be a great way of staying active without necessarily feeling like you’re flogging yourself with workouts. 

Fitness Boxing

Another great game for the Switch, Fitness Boxing takes maximum advantage of the Joy-Con controllers to let you take virtual boxing lessons and punch your way to getting fit.

It’s more explicitly about fitness than some of the others on this list, which brings with it a different tone and a bit more potential intensity to make sure that even if you get properly in shape it’ll still offer up solid workouts. It might not have the lustre of more mainstream efforts, but it’s still a great option. 

Beat Saber

Moving into the world of VR, Beat Saber is a really fun VR game that’s pretty taxing

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COVID Exposure Risk Outside of Work Increasing for Clinicians

Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center.

One third of COVID-19 exposures among health care providers (HCPs) in Minnesota are due to family or community exposure, not patient care, according to a study conducted by the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) and published online October 30 in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. And nonwork exposures were more likely to lead to COVID-19 infections.

Between March 6 and July 11, 2020, researchers with the MDH evaluated 21,406 incidences of HCP exposure to confirmed COVID-19 cases. Of those, 5374 (25%) were classified as higher-risk exposures, meaning the provider had close contact for 15 minutes or more, or during an aerosol-generating procedure.

Two thirds (66%) of the higher-risk exposures occurred during direct patient care and 34% were related to nonpatient care interactions (eg, coworkers, social and household contacts). Overall, 6.9% (373) of the HCPs with a higher-risk exposure received a positive SARS-CoV-2 test result within 14 days of the exposure. Notably, HCPs with household or social exposure had the highest positivity rate across all exposure types at 13%.

“Since the time period covered in this report, we’ve seen a significant increase in the proportion of HCPs who have had higher-risk exposures outside of work due to household or social contacts,” said lead author Ashley Fell, MPH, from the Minnesota Department of Health.

“HCPs with household or social exposures are also more likely to test positive than HCPs with higher risk exposures within the healthcare setting, which is an important message for both HCPs and the community at large that more COVID-19 spreading in our communities poses a greater risk to our HCPs and health care system,” Fell told Medscape Medical News.

When evaluating personal protective equipment (PPE) use among exposed HCPs, researchers found that 90% of providers in acute or ambulatory care were wearing a respirator or medical-grade face mask at time of exposure, compared with just 68% of HCPs working in congregate living or long-term care facilities.

Further, investigators found that an HCP with a positive SARS-CoV-2 test working in a congregate living or long-term care facility resulted in exposure of a median of three additional HCPs (interquartile range [IQR], 1-6) compared with a median of one additional HCP exposure in acute or ambulatory care (IQR, 1-3).

The researchers also found that, compared with HCPs in acute or ambulatory settings, HCPs working in long-term care or congregate living settings were more likely to return to work following a high-risk exposure (57% vs 37%) and work while symptomatic (4.8% vs 1.3%).

When asked whether these findings apply to HCPs in other states, Andrew T. Chan, MD, from Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, noted: “These data are not surprising and confirm what many of us have been seeing in our own areas.

“Clearly, the risk of contracting COVID-19 is particularly high for front-line health care workers in long-term care facilities and nursing homes,” Chan said.

“Furthermore, the infection control practices in these care settings are often

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Does Hard Work Help Preserve the Brain? | Health News

By Cara Murez, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

MONDAY, NOV 2, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Physical activity is known to help prevent dementia and disease, but it’s possible that the kind you do makes a difference.

A new study found that hard physical work not only doesn’t lower the risk of dementia, it increases the risk of developing the disease.

Researchers found that people who do hard physical work have a 55 percent higher risk of developing dementia than those doing sedentary work.

“The WHO [World Health Organization] guide to preventing dementia and disease on the whole mentions physical activity as an important factor. But our study suggests that it must be a ‘good’ form of physical activity, which hard physical work is not,” said researcher Kirsten Nabe-Nielsen, an associate professor from the Department of Public Health at the University of Copenhagen. “Guides from the health authorities should therefore differentiate between physical activity in your spare time and physical activity at work, as there is reason to believe that the two forms of physical activity have opposite effects.”

Another study from the University of Copenhagen recently showed that a healthy lifestyle can halve the risk of developing dementia.

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the National Research Centre for the Working Environment used data from the Copenhagen Male Study, in which 4,721 Danish men reported in the 1970s about the type of work they did for 14 Copenhagen-based companies. Over the years, researchers compiled health data on the respondents.

Now, researchers are collecting more data with the intent to identify healthier ways of doing hard physical work in a way that it has an “exercise effect.”

“A lot of workplaces have already taken steps to improve the health of their staff. The problem is that it is the most well-educated and resourceful part of the population that uses these initiatives. Those with a shorter education often struggle with overweight, pain and poor physical fitness, even though they take more steps during the day and to a larger extent use their body as a tool,” said study co-author Andreas Holtermann, from the National Research Centre for the Working Environment.

“For workmen, it is not enough, for example, to avoid heavy lifts if they wish to remain in the profession until age 70. People with a shorter education doing manual labour also need to take preventive steps by strengthening the body’s capacity via, for example, exercise and strength training,” Holtermann said in a university news release.

The research was published recently in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports.

SOURCE: University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, news release, Oct. 26, 2020

Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Paralympic athlete, others work through Ability360 gym closure due to COVID-19

For people with disabilities, Ability360’s fitness center is not just a gym. It’s a gift, a lifeline, a privilege, a necessity.

The 45,000-square-foot fitness center, part of a 62,000-square-foot campus tucked in a business area east of Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport and along the light rail route, is the first of its kind in the western United States and one of only a few in the nation.

Its equipment is designed with accessibility in mind. For example, the lap pool has a lowered bench for transferring directly from a wheelchair to the water. The fitness room features strength, cardio and free weight equipment like any gym, but they’re designed to accommodate people with disabilities.

The campus is also home to a slew of nonprofits that help people with various disabilities and is typically bustling with activity. Ability360’s fitness center started the year with 2,800 members.

For those with recent injuries, the gym is a place to see and meet others who have coped with and grown stronger from their injuries, a place for encouragement.

For others, it’s the only place they ever get to use accessible equipment. It might be the only reason they leave the house.

For a select few, like those who had been training to play in the 2020 Summer Paralympics in Tokyo, it’s one of the best and most adaptive training facilities in the state.

“This is a place like nowhere else,” said Ability360 vice president and general manager Gus LaZear. “It’s warm, it’s welcoming, people are friendly but also keep you accountable for working out.”

Like many gyms, Ability360 shut down March 17. But when other gyms raced to reopen, Ability360 leaders were more cautious. They serve a more vulnerable population.

The Arizona Republic followed three Ability360 members over several months, documenting as they coped with the rollercoaster of closures and re-openings at the facility they described as being like a second home, a place where their disability didn’t define them.

CLOSE

When Ability360, a Phoenix gym for people with disabilities closed because of the COVID-19 pandemic, they adapted.

Arizona Republic

For a Paralympic athlete, Ability360 is essential

Joe Jackson, 30, has been paralyzed from the waist down since being injured during a Hamilton High School football game in 2005.

Breaking his C6 vertebrae in his lower neck left him without the ability to sweat, meaning he can quickly overheat — a common result of spinal cord injuries.

He didn’t used to have to think about it because of the air conditioned rooms at Ability360. He’d been going there three to five days a week for sessions spanning several hours since the gym’s opening in 2011.

Ability360’s focus on accessibility has been a “game-changer” for Jackson, he said.

Jackson in 2007 started playing quad rugby and joined Ability360’s team, which practiced three times per week for three hours at a time at the facility on top of regular games and tournaments.

In 2017, Jackson became a member of the U.S. Paralympic wheelchair rugby team,

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Intermittent Fasting Does Work for Weight Loss, Doctor Clarifies

There’s been a lot of talk about the effectiveness of popular weight-loss plan intermittent fasting. With many studies being done on this time-restricted eating plan, there’s also always new information being presented, but the end result is largely the same: intermittent fasting works for weight loss.

Recently, a study was published in JAMA that looked at time-restricted eating and its weight loss effects in both men and women. As the results were shared, some of the information seemed to get misconstrued, according to a doctor who now wants to clarify.

Monique Tello, M.D., MPH, a practicing physician at Massachusetts General Hospital, director of research and academic affairs for the MGH DGM Healthy Lifestyle Program, and clinical instructor at Harvard Medical School, was not involved in the study. But, she recently published a blog post on Harvard Health’s blog saying she had seen headlines about this study claiming that intermittent fasting doesn’t work and has a significant negative impact on muscle mass. She believes, though, that these research results have largely been misinterpreted. (Related: 5 Science-Backed Benefits of Intermittent Fasting.)

The original study tested 141 overweight patients over a period of 12 weeks. Some were put on a time-restricted eating plan while others followed a traditional eating plan. Dr. Tello points out that there was no true control group in the study because each patient was put on a schedule of some sort. A true control group would have been given no instructions or guidelines.

In the end, both groups lost weight, but the study showed that the intermittent fasting group lost more, including muscle mass that wasn’t identified in those on a traditional eating plan. But as Dr. Tello explains in her post, the study makes no mention about the quality of food both groups were eating.

“By the way, all of these folks may have been eating fried or fast foods, and sugary sodas and candy—we don’t know,” writes Dr. Tello in Harvard Health. “The study doesn’t mention quality of diet or physical activity. This isn’t how IF is supposed to be done! And yet the IF folks still lost between half a pound and 4 pounds.”

Plus, Dr. Tello notes that both groups were given a structured eating plan. Dr. Tello believes having a true control group, in which participants continued to eat as they normally would, could’ve made these research findings more conclusive.

She reiterated that the study did, in fact, show that intermittent fasting works for weight loss, it’s just that some of the results weren’t necessarily presented properly, and the study was, perhaps, a bit flawed in its setup.

“While this one negative study adds to the body of literature on IF, it doesn’t reverse it,” Dr. Tello writes in her post. “We simply need more high-quality studies in order to have a better understanding of how to most effectively incorporate IF into a healthy lifestyle.”

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Two Brothers, Nurses, Work Side By Side in COVID-19 ICU | U.S. News Hospital Heroes

After they graduated from high school in North Carolina, Guillermo Vargas and his brother Jonathan wanted to join the Marines. The Mexican immigrants were prepared to serve the U.S. by donning military fatigues and battling enemies overseas.

The Marines turned the Vargas brothers away, Guillermo and Jonathan say, because of their immigration status. Born in Mexico and brought to the U.S. as children without documentation, the brothers were approved for a program that shields kids like them from deportation. But the program doesn’t confer all the rights of citizenship or permanent legal residency.

So today, the brothers serve on a different front line – in the battle against COVID-19. Guillermo, 32, and Jonathan, 30, are both registered nurses in the intensive care unit at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Instead of wearing camo and carrying military-grade weapons to battle flesh-and-blood enemies, the brothers don personal protective equipment – disposable gowns, gloves and masks – to protect themselves against the highly transmissible novel coronavirus.

The daily battle they wage while providing treatment to COVID-19 patients in the ICU exacts a heavy emotional and mental toll on the brothers.

Several times, both siblings have cared for patients over a period of weeks, getting to know them and the relatives who call to check on their loved ones. Some COVID-19 patients have briefly improved, only to quickly deteriorate and die. “It does feel like you’re in a never-ending battle, the way the pandemic is going right now,” Jonathan says. “You’re fighting for people’s lives, and patients keep streaming in. We’re exhausted, we’re tired, we’re mentally burned out.”

Jonathan recalls being present as another nurse held an iPad so a COVID-19 patient near death could speak to his relatives one final time. “It was pretty difficult,” he says. “The patient was taking his last breaths surrounded by strangers.” Watching COVID-19 patients die without the company of loved ones “is one of the hardest things we do,” Guillermo says. “The first thing you think about is your family. You think ‘this could be my mom, my dad, my brother.’ It’s very sad.”

In the first weeks of the pandemic, Wake Forest Baptist didn’t allow family members to visit COVID-19 patients because of the highly-transmissible nature of the virus, the brothers say. Forsyth County, where Winston-Salem is located, was then among the handful of counties reporting the highest number of novel coronavirus cases in North Carolina. The rate leveled off, more or less, during the summer. Cases are now rising again: In the medical intensive care unit where the Vargas brothers work, most of the 32 beds for COVID-19 patients have been filled in recent weeks. Overall, the hospital has about 70 beds for COVID-19 patients; officials can increase or decrease the number of COVID-19 beds, depending on the need for them, a Wake Forest Baptist spokeswoman says.

Stressful Immigration Status

The two siblings spent their early years in a poor area in the state of

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Does Microban Work On COVID? EPA Signs Off On 24-Hour Bacteria-Shield Claims

The Environmental Protection Agency approved a spray that’s known to kill the virus that causes COVID-19 on contact, the developer said Thursday.

North America Home Care, an arm of Proctor & Gamble, said its Microban 24 Sanitizing Spray was found to kill SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the global pandemic.

Already available at most retail outlets, the spray is shown to kill 99.9% of the bacteria and viruses it comes into contact with, including the common cold and flu viruses. While it offers 24-hour protection against some common bacterial strains, the developers said it does not provide 24-hour residual protection against viruses.

Frank Esper, a doctor with the Cleveland Clinic and a company advisor, said that, without a vaccine, it’s important for people to sanitize.

“With delays in COVID-19 virus testing, having any infection may lead to significant disruptions at home, school, and work,” he said in a statement. “Therefore, over the coming cold and flu season, it will be especially important to ensure protection against viruses and bacteria that can cause infections.”

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said Monday he felt confident a vaccine might be available yet this year, but it would only diminish the chances of showing COVID-19 symptoms, not offer a cure.

Health officials in the Northern Hemisphere are concerned the onset of colder weather will make people more susceptible to colds and flus, as well as SARS-CoV-2.

Akiki Iwasaki, a Yale immunologist, told health news agency STAT last week that colder air and less humidity means drier conditions that limit how mucus can protect against foreign invaders like the novel coronavirus, placing a premium on sanitization and disinfection.

The spray is not a drug and should not be ingested. Drugs in the U.S. are approved by the Food and Drug Administration, not the EPA.

The developers of Microsrpay 24 says it's shown to kill the virus behind the pandemic. The developers of Microsrpay 24 says it’s shown to kill the virus behind the pandemic. Photo: Proctor & Gamble

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Fitness Startup Lets Trainers Work From Home

The team at Moxie had big plans for 2020. It was going to be the year that the on-demand fitness platform broke into the technology categories of blockchain and micro-transactions. Then February and COVID-19 happened, and self-described serial entrepreneur Jason Goldberg went into crisis mode. It wasn’t a new business model pivot he was after – it was complete reinvention.

“It became clear in February that the business we wanted to launch was not going to launch this year,” Goldberg told PYMNTS. “And so we decided we could either just wait it out and see what happened over the next 18 to 24 months, or we could build something that people need right now. And it took about a week for us to agree that we were just going to pivot the entire business and go all in on building something the people needed right now. We asked ourselves what we were going to miss the most during the pandemic. We saw there was an opportunity in fitness, because people were working out at home and couldn’t take classes with their favorite instructor. We saw an opportunity both from the instructor standpoint and from the fitness fanatic standpoint.”

Moxie launches today (Tuesday) after spending the summer and fall in beta. Goldberg likes to call it the Airbnb of fitness. More formally, it is a hybrid fitness site for instructors to reach clients, both new and existing. And it’s a site where fitness enthusiasts can find subscriptions for monthly or weekly live classes, all streamed directly on its platform. Subscribers also get access to the video recordings, which can be streamed on Moxie’s site, as well as music clearances, playlists and CRM functionality for the instructors to manage their clients. During the beta phase, Goldberg says there were more than 6,500 classes available, and more than 10,000 individual sessions were live-streamed. The site has also signed up more than 2,000 instructors.

At its core, Moxie has provided independent instructors with a place to set up shop, regardless of whether they were previously teaching at Equinox, Planet Fitness or Yoga Works. The platform has essentially enabled fitness instructors to become entrepreneurs, and Goldberg says it has shifted the economic model. Pre-pandemic, a fitness instructor would show up at a studio and – depending on where in the U.S. she was living – would make between $25 and $75 per class at most, with the balance of the fee going to the studio or gym. In the Moxie model, the instructor keeps 85 percent of the revenue.

“Imagine this,” Goldberg said. “It’s January. Group fitness has been the fastest-growing sector in the fitness industry for the last decade. Every day you’re hustling, busting your butt teaching these classes because you love what you do. You love helping people. But the fitness studio did all the work for administration and payment. And then imagine, suddenly COVID hits and you’re laid off, or you’re furloughed, or you’re told

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Work by Minnesota researchers reveals deadly combo: COVID and major heart attacks

Complications from COVID-19 can make the most dangerous kinds of heart attacks even more deadly, according to a new study.

The finding has special implications for African American and Hispanic residents, as well as diabetics, since those three groups are at greater risk of having severe heart attacks and contracting COVID-19.

In a first-of-its-kind effort, a group of North American heart hospitals examined nearly 600 patients and found a surprisingly high death rate among COVID-19 patients with the most severe heart attacks, caused by complete blockage of an artery supplying oxygen to the heart muscle.

“These patients are at very high risk,” said interventional cardiologist Dr. Santiago Garcia, primary investigator at the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, where the data are being analyzed. “Mortality for heart attack patients … should be in single digits. We’re seeing mortality here that is 32%.”

The findings, announced at a medical conference this month, were the public’s first glimpse of results from the ongoing project known as NACMI, an international consortium compiling data from COVID-19 patients who have a so-called “STEMI” heart attack involving a completely blocked blood vessel.

The study examined 594 STEMI patients treated at 64 hospitals during the pandemic in Canada and the U.S. through Oct. 4 and found those with confirmed cases of COVID died in the hospital at almost triple the rate as those who tested negative for the viral illness.

About 20% of all heart attacks are thought to be STEMI.

The study also documented an increased risk of in-hospital strokes among COVID-positive heart-attack patients.

The NACMI findings aren’t published in a journal yet, but the initial data were presented Oct. 14 at the annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics conference.

Scientists widely believe COVID makes heart attacks and strokes more likely, and more dangerous, by causing changes in the heart, lungs and blood. The NACMI research can’t prove COVID triggers heart attacks and strokes — only that mortality rose when both were present.

But doctors say the correlation is noteworthy.

“Those are stunning numbers,” said Dr. Mladen Vido­vich, an interventional cardiologist and associate journal editor in Chicago who was not involved in the research. He said the death rate in the COVID group was similar to what was seen among heart-attack patients 50 years ago.

The risks are especially significant for African American and Hispanic patients, who tested positive for COVID more often than white and Asian patients in the first release of NACMI data. Organizers will be adding patients in Mexico and South America and tracking long-term outcomes.

Cardiologists say the early results underscore the longstanding recommendation that people feeling heart-attack signs should go to the hospital — even with hospitalizations for COVID-19 on the rise.

In Minnesota, 500 people have been admitted to the hospital for COVID-19 in the past week, including 106 cases sent to intensive care, the Minnesota Department of Health reported.

On Sunday, the Health Department added 1,684 new cases to the state’s tally, which now stands at 133,802. The deaths of 2,335 Minnesotans have

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