What’s the Difference Between a Dentist and an Orthodontist? Part 2

This follows on from a previous article explaining the simple difference between dentists and orthodontists in terms of other subjects like doctors and surgeons and police officers and detectives. This article outlines the types of work that dentists and orthodontists do.

Years ago, hundreds of years ago, dentistry was a fairly unsophisticated subject. It required good physical skill, but the range of treatments available was fairly small – if your tooth was badly hurting, you saw someone to take it out. There weren’t any anaesthetics, so if you were lucky, the dentist took out the tooth quickly, and it didn’t break on the way out, and it didn’t hurt too much, and if you were very lucky he took out the correct tooth first time.

There wasn’t the option of modern fillings or root treatments, or gum treatments. There weren’t even antibiotic medicines to stop infections and abscesses. In fact, dental infections were a significant cause of death in the middle ages. Back then, a lot of dentistry, like a lot of surgery, was carried out by barbers, who had a good collection of blades and steel instruments.

Eventually dentistry moved on. More treatments were developed and some teeth could be saved. Advances in anaesthetics meant that more work could be done on teeth without upsetting the patients. After a while examinations were brought in to make sure that the people carrying out dentistry were fit to do so and this helped protect the public from poor dentists.

Over the years dentistry became even more advanced. Nowadays, a dentist would leave dental school and expect to know about:

  • Fillings
  • Crowns
  • Bridges
  • Veneers
  • Tooth whitening
  • Implants
  • Root treatments
  • Gum diseases
  • Jaw muscle problems
  • Problems involving the lining of the mouth, including the tongue, and including monitoring for mouth cancer
  • Dentures
  • Dental Surgery
  • Children’s dentistry
  • Orthodontics
  • Dental X-Rays
  • Medical problems related to dentistry
  • Dental problems related to medicine
  • Medications needed to treat dental problems

That’s a lot to stay on top of, and it also is a lot of instruments to keep in order to provide all of these treatments, so many dentists tend to concentrate on the areas that interest them most. The area I know best is orthodontics, and here are some of the areas of orthodontics that orthodontists need to think about when planning, organising, and carrying out treatment for a patient:

  • Invisible braces (like INVISALIGN))
  • Tooth coloured braces (like DAMON CLEAR)
  • Metal Fixed Braces (train tracks like DAMON Q or MX)
  • Lingual Braces (Braces on the inside of the teeth)
  • Removable braces
  • Retainer braces
  • Twin block braces
  • Headgear braces
  • Developing teeth
  • Extra teeth (supernumerary teeth)
  • Missing teeth
  • Teeth with abnormal roots
  • Teeth in an abnormal position
  • Abnormal jaw bone
  • Abnormal tooth shape
  • Abnormal jaw sizes
  • Abnormal gums
  • How the growth of the face and jaws will affect the treatment
  • How to tell if a patient’s face is still growing
  • If the patient needs surgery for the teeth
  • If the patient needs surgery for the jaws
  • If the patient

Direct Primary Care and Concierge Medicine – What’s the Difference?

The Difference Between Concierge Medicine and Direct Primary Care

Direct primary care (DPC) is a term often linked to its companion in health care, ‘concierge medicine.’ Although the two terms are similar and belong to the same family, concierge medicine is a term that fully embraces or ‘includes’ many different health care delivery models, direct primary care being one of them.

Similarities

DPC practices, similar in philosophy to their concierge medicine lineage – bypass insurance and go for a more ‘direct’ financial relationship with patients and also provide comprehensive care and preventive services for an affordable fee. However, DPC is only one branch in the family tree of concierge medicine.

DPC, like concierge health care practices, remove many of the financial barriers to ‘accessing’ care whenever care is needed. There are no insurance co-pays, deductibles or co-insurance fees. DPC practices also do not typically accept insurance payments, thus avoiding the overhead and complexity of maintaining relationships with insurers, which can consume as much as $0.40 of each medical dollar spent (See Sources Below).

Differences

According to sources (see below) DPC is a ‘mass-market variant of concierge medicine, distinguished by its low prices.’ Simply stated, the biggest difference between ‘direct primary care’ and retainer based practices is that DPC takes a low, flat rate fee whereas omodels, (although plans may vary by practice) – usually charge an annual retainer fee and promise more ‘access’ to the doctor.

According to Concierge Medicine Today (MDNewsToday), the first official news outlet for this marketplace, both health care delivery models are providing affordable, cost-effective health care to thousands of patients across the U.S. MDNewsToday is also the only known organization that is officially tracking and collecting data on these practices and the physicians — including the precise number of concierge physicians and practices throughout the U.S.

“This primary care business model [direct primary care] gives these type of providers the time to deliver more personalized care to their patients and pursue a comprehensive medical home approach,” said Norm Wu, CEO of Qliance Medical Management based in Seattle, Washington. “One in which the provider’s incentives are fully aligned with the patient’s incentives.”

References and Sources

“Doc This Way!: Tech-Savvy Patients and Pros Work Up Healthcare 2.0”. New York Post. 4/7/2009.

Who Killed Marcus Welby? from Seattle’s The Stranger, 1/23/2008

“Direct Medical Practice – The Uninsured Solution to the Primary Medical Care Mess” with Dr. Garrison Bliss (Qliance Medical Group of WA).

“Direct Primary Care: A New Brew In Seattle”. Harvard Medical School – WebWeekly. 2008-03-03.

DPCare.org

Qliance.com

ConciergeMedicineToday.com

Source Article

What’s the Best Way to Discover a Great Cosmetic Dentist?

It is imperative to choose the right cosmetic dentist to get your desired results. Since cosmetic dentistry is not officially recognized in the field of dentistry, any dentist can consider himself/herself as a cosmetic dentist. In general, all dentists learn how to perform different procedures in the area of cosmetic dentistry, but to be able to accomplish a higher level of expertise, they need to go through years of extensive learning and training.

Ask for Recommendations

Ask friends, family members or coworkers if they can recommend a good cosmetic dentist. When they do refer someone, check the website of the doctor, contact the office or visit for a preliminary consultation. You can also ask for referrals from other dentists you know.

Look at Their Work

Majority of dentists who carry out cosmetic dental procedures take pride in what they do, so they document their work by taking before and after pictures. Usually, these photos can be viewed online or in an album at the dentist’s clinic. As a warning, make sure that the photos being shown are real patients of the dentist being considered, and not pictures that are commercially produced.

Check on Their Credentials

Even though a certain dentist is highly recommended and shows beautiful pictures of his/her work, you still want to ensure that he/she has the qualifications needed. Check the prospective doctor’s website to know the school he/she graduated from, the continuing education courses that were completed, as well as the professional organizations in which he/she is a member. The cosmetic dentists that are highly qualified are part of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry.

Make Your Wish List

It is crucial to decide on the things you want to fix about your smile prior to your initial consultation with a cosmetic dentist. Take a look at yourself, then make a list. This way, once you have chosen your cosmetic dentist, you can present your wish list for comparison with the suggestions of your dentist.

Express Your Desire

When it comes to enhancing a smile, it is important for a person to have his own view of what looks good to achieve satisfying results. The art of “smile enhancement” depends on the ability of a dentist to incorporate a person’s own opinion of what is important with the application of the dentist’s scientific knowledge to smile design. Since your dentist is professionally trained and experienced, he can see dental possibilities better than you do. So, it is his/her duty to teach you so you can come up with your own choices. At the same time, you should be confident that your dentist considers the results you want to achieve.

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