The Only ‘Cyber Week’ Health and Fitness Deals Worth Knowing About

It’s official — Black Friday 2020 is upon us. With more deals, bargains and discounts than you could shake a shaker at, it can be hard to cut through the noise of endless reams of retailers promising to save you money before Christmas shopping kicks in.



a close up of a camera: We've cut through the noise to bring you the very best health, fitness and wellness deals


© Provided by Men’s Health UK
We’ve cut through the noise to bring you the very best health, fitness and wellness deals

Men’s Health, as ever, is here to help dilute the millions of deals into a tangible buyer’s guide for the man who enjoys exercising, using new tech and, of course, saving money.

Below, we’ve rounded up our most popular articles for Black Friday 2020, including Nike discount codes, low-key Under Armour sales, next-gen smartwatches, workout-proof headphones, discounted protein powder — including Optimum Nutrition, Bulk Powders, Myprotein and Maximuscle, gym swag from Lululemon, Reebok and Fitbit, WFH-proof coffee machines and many more besides . You’ll find them all below.

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First Diversity Week at Stanford Medicine tackles tough topics in medical education, health care | News Center

People are a composite of many interconnected identities, Lassiter said, and taking an “intersectional” point of view is helpful in assessing how diverse, equitable and inclusive a workplace is. As an example, Lassiter described a case study of a particular organization that touted the number of women and people of color in their workforce. 

 The “statistics sound great on the surface, but … when we look at the data from an intersectional perspective, we see that the women in the organization are mostly white women, and the largest group of men in their organization is white men,” Lassiter said. 

 “When organizations say, ‘We’ve increased our numbers of women,’ who are those women?” Lassiter said. Similarly, when groups claim, “’We’ve increased our numbers of people of color,’ who’s included in [their definition of] people of color?” These are the questions that the framework of intersectionality helps us address, Lassiter said.

Diversity, equity and inclusion in medical education

We have to be willing to employ the same kind of rigor we apply to studies of science and medicine to efforts designed to eliminate bias and racism and promote diversity and inclusion, several speakers said.

In 2017, a 10-month program called Leadership, Education and Advancing Diversity, or LEAD, was created to pair Stanford Medicine residents and fellows with mentors who are Stanford Medicine faculty or educational administrators. 

“I had no idea how impactful this work would be,” Carmin Powell, MD, clinical assistant professor of pediatrics, told attendees at the Diversity and Inclusion Forum on Oct. 9. Powell co-directs LEAD with Lahia Yemane, MD. 

Every month, LEAD’s participants take part in discussion-based lectures on various topics related to equity, diversity and inclusion. They also work with their mentors to develop a presentation to deliver at the annual Diversity and Inclusion Forum.

 In just four years, LEAD has tripled in size, growing from 30 scholars and mentors to more than 100, Powell said. Part of the program’s success is its engagement with medical residents and fellows early in their careers, making equity, diversity and inclusion a part of their training.

Knowledge is key

Educating yourself on the history of racism and how to foster diversity and inclusion is essential, said Marc Nivet, executive vice president for institutional advancement at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and keynote speaker at this year’s Diversity and Inclusion Forum.

“If you get nothing else out of today’s talk, I would just implore you to read and to get educated,” Nivet said. 

“You can no longer be an effective leader, period — not just in academic medicine — but period, without being much more elevated in your ability to understand these issues,” he said. “And that comes from reading and learning.”

Learning, trying new things and sharing what does — and doesn’t— work is important for progress, Nivet explained. “I think we don’t share the results of failure, which is typical in academic medicine. We don’t get points for writing about failures or initiatives that didn’t work and why

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VYPE Class 6A Helmet Stickers powered by Houston Methodist Orthopedics & Sports Medicine: Week 9 (Nov. 19-21)

Welcome to a new VYPE feature for the 2020 football season – VYPE Helmet Stickers powered by Houston Methodist Orthopedics & Sports Medicine! Every week, VYPE will scour the stat sheets of the previous week and find the top performers.


Class 6A teams went into Week 9 and wow there were some amazing performances! See who earned VYPE Helmet Stickers this week. Here are the selections

PREVIOUS HELMET STICKER SELECTIONS

– Week 1 (Sept. 24-27)
– Week 2 (Oct. 1-3)
– Week 3 (Oct. 8-10)
– Week 4 (Oct. 15-17)
– Week 5 (Oct. 22-24)
– Week 6 (Oct. 29-31)
– Week 7 (Nov. 3-5
– Week 8 (Nov. 12-14)

Carter Brown (@CarterABrown) – Pearland Dawson

Let’s lead this thing off with a kicker! In the epic District 23-6A showdown last week at Freedom Field, it went to overtime between Shadow Creek and Pearland Dawson. After a turnover on its first drive of overtime, Pearland Dawson had a chance to win the game. They got in field goal range and called on All-State kicker Carter Brown. He trotted out and nailed a 23-yard game-winning field goal to clinch the District 23-6A Championship for the Eagles and second-ever undefeated regular season. He also went 4 of 4 in extra point attempts in the game as well.

Daelyn Williams (@sirpaydae) – Dekaney 

Dekaney improved to 3-0 in district play after a 52-7 win over Eisenhower last week. The Wildcats’ offense was paced by Daelyn Williams finished 10 of 14 for 184 yards and three touchdowns. It was a nice win for Dekaney.

Charles Garrett (@3way_tank) – Klein Oak

In a tight 21-14 win over Klein last week, Klein Oak running back Charles Garrett had a nice afternoon. Garrett finished the game rushing for 143 yards and a score on 18 carries. Nice game for the junior back for the Panthers.

Colton Marwill (@CMarwill) – Tomball Memorial

It took a thrilling 49-48 overtime victory over Klein Collins to remain perfect but Tomball Memorial was able to do just that. Colton Marwill has returned at QB after being held out a few weeks due to injury. Marwill looks fully healthy again as he finished 20 of 32 for 328 yards and four touchdowns with two interceptions. Marwill also rushed for another 37 yards.

Cy Park Team! 

We are giving a helmet sticker to the ENTIRE Cy Park football team!! That’s what you get when you make history. Last week a 42-29 win over Langham Creek punched the Tigers’ ticket to the 2020 playoffs. It is the first time in program history that Cy Park is heading to the playoffs. Some individual performances did stand out. The Tigers only had five yards passing for the game but then ran the ball for 475 yards. That’s

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Virginia Coronavirus Case Average Reaches New High In Last Week

VIRGINIA — The seven-day average of new coronavirus cases has reached a new peak in Virginia as cases have been over 1,000 for six straight days.

Because the Virginia Department of Health coronavirus dashboard was down for maintenance for much of Saturday, we’re providing an update on the weekend. The month of October ended with 1,551 new cases on Saturday, and 1,202 were reported on Sunday. Cumulative cases total 182,392.

The seven-day case average is 1,289 and has been increasing in the last week. The highest new case count in October had been 1,844 on Oct. 8, but that was attributed to a backlog of cases from the previous day.

By region, the new cases on Sunday included 373 in the southwest region, 300 in the northern region, 186 in the central region, 180 in the northwest region and 163 in the eastern region. The southwest region also reported 582 new cases on Saturday, marking the highest daily cases to date for the region.

The statewide positive average is up to 5.7 percent with 2,647,659 PCR tests completed to date. Seven-day averages by region are 9.4 percent in the southwest region, 5.6 percent in the northern region, 5.4 percent in the central region, 4.3 percent in the eastern region, and 3.5 percent in the northwest region.

There was just one new death reported on Sunday and 11 on Saturday. Total deaths to date are up to 3,655. When looking at deaths by the date on death certificates, the highest seven-day average remains 40.1 deaths on May 5. Data may be incomplete for the last few weeks, but the average has been half of the May 5 peak or less in recent months.

Cumulative hospitalizations stand at 12,647, while the current patient count is 1,012. By region, that includes 284 in the southwest region, 242 in the northern region, 196 in the central region, 162 in the eastern region, and 128 in the northwest region.

The 1,012 statewide hospitalizations include 98 patients on ventilators and 228 in the intensive care units, according to the Virginia Hospital & Healthcare Association. Ventilator use among all hospital patients stands at 28 percent, and ICU occupancy is at 61 percent occupancy. No hospitals are reporting difficulty obtaining personal protective equipment or other medical supplies in the next 72 hours.

Outbreaks, defined as two or more laboratory-confirmed cases in a setting, account for 28,019 cases to date. There have been 12,608 cases and 1,782 deaths in long-term care facilities. K-12 settings account for 212 cases and no deaths, while colleges and universities have 2,466 outbreak-associated cases and no deaths.

Below are the latest coronavirus data updates for our coverage area from Friday to Sunday:

  • Alexandria: 4,349 cases, 325 hospitalizations, 74 deaths; increase of 46 cases and one hospitalization

  • Arlington County: 4,764 cases, 541 hospitalizations, 154 deaths; increase of 78 cases

  • Fairfax County: 24,233 cases, 2,287 hospitalizations, 605 deaths; increase of 289 cases and nine hospitalizations

  • Fairfax City: 164 cases, 14 hospitalizations, eight deaths;

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Miami Zoo’s resident dentist gives animals check ups for dental week



a group of people sitting around a dog: MailOnline logo


© Provided by Daily Mail
MailOnline logo

Dental health is as important for animals as it is for humans.

This week, the furry and fanged residents of Miami-Dade Zoological Park and Gardens, also known as Zoo Miami, went to the dentist. 

A variety of procedures were performed during Dental Week, from cleanings to root canals, and patients included a lion, gorilla, chimpanzee, tapir, aardvark and otters. 

The most common issue was removing accumulated tarter, as well as cracked or broken teeth that had to be repaired or extracted.

All the animals were fully sedated, both for their comfort and the dentist’s safety.

Scroll down for video



a person sitting on the floor: Barney, a 27-year-old-gorilla, getting a tooth extracted during 'Dental Week' at Zoo Miami


© Provided by Daily Mail
Barney, a 27-year-old-gorilla, getting a tooth extracted during ‘Dental Week’ at Zoo Miami

‘We have never had an animal wake up during a procedure,’ said zoo ambassador Ron Magill. ‘They are carefully monitored by an anesthesia team and if they show any sign of awakening, they are administered additional anesthesia to keep them fully sedated.’

Because animals generally don’t complain about dental pain, veterinarians often refer to it as ‘silent suffering.’

By the time anything is discovered, the disease or infection may be so far along that it’s debilitating – or even fatal.

General dental exams are performed on animals during regular health examinations.



a group of stuffed animals sitting next to a woman: Kashifa, a 10-year-old lioness, was well sedated before her tooth was extracted. 'We have never had an animal wake up during a procedure,' said zoo ambassador Ron Magill


© Provided by Daily Mail
Kashifa, a 10-year-old lioness, was well sedated before her tooth was extracted. ‘We have never had an animal wake up during a procedure,’ said zoo ambassador Ron Magill



a dog wearing a hat: Sedation lasts about three to eight hours, with the dosage depending on the size and age of the animal


© Provided by Daily Mail
Sedation lasts about three to eight hours, with the dosage depending on the size and age of the animal

If an issue is diagnosed, the zoo’s veterinarians will either resolve it themselves or, depending on its severity, enlist a veterinary dental specialist.

‘Dental health is a key component of the Animal Health Department’s preventative medicine program at Zoo Miami,’ said Magill, who snapped photos of the unusual proceedings. ‘A variety of issues ranging from gum disease to broken teeth can lead to critical care issues that may result in serious infection and even death without treatment.’



a person petting a dog: Veterinary dentist Jamie Berning and her veterinary technician, Jill Bates, traveled to Miami from Columbus, Ohio, to perform procedures on a variety of animals


© Provided by Daily Mail
Veterinary dentist Jamie Berning and her veterinary technician, Jill Bates, traveled to Miami from Columbus, Ohio, to perform procedures on a variety of animals



a person wearing a costume: The most common issue was removing accumulated tarter, as well as cracked or broken teeth that had to be repaired or extracted


© Provided by Daily Mail
The most common issue was removing accumulated tarter, as well as cracked or broken teeth that had to be repaired or extracted

This week, veterinary dentist Jamie Berning and her veterinary technician, Jill Bates, traveled to Miami from Columbus, Ohio, to perform procedures on a variety of animals.

Barney, the zoo’s 27-year-old gorilla, Hondo, a 26-year-old chimpanzee, and Kashifa, a 10-year-old lioness all had to have teeth extracted.

The procedures, which took between two and seven hours, were spread out over three days.

Sedation lasts about three to eight hours, with the dosage depending on the size and age of the animal.

Dr. Berning was able to treat two to three animals a day.



a person holding an object in his mouth: Hondo, a 26-year-old chimpanzee, also had to have a tooth extracted


© Provided by

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50 New Coronavirus Cases Confirmed Since Last Week In Deerfield

DEERFIELD, IL — Like every other municipality in Illinois, the Village of Deerfield has been dealing with its own unique data points regarding the coronavirus. According to the Illinois Department of Public Health, 557 people have contracted COVID-19 in Deerfield since the outbreak began. That’s an increase of 50 cases since Oct. 23. For further comparison, there was an increase of 51 cases between Oct. 16-23.

The Lake County Health Department reports there have been 20,825 confirmed cases in Lake County. That’s an increase of 895 cases since Oct. 23. For further comparison, there was an increase of 1,021 cases between Oct. 16-23. In addition, there have been 517 deaths, marking an increase of 10 since Oct. 23. For further comparison, there was an increase of 13 deaths between Oct. 16-23.

Here is a breakdown of Lake County cases by age:

The Lake County recovery rate from the coronavirus is currently 96.8 percent. Recovered cases are defined as persons with initial positive specimen collection date greater than 42 days who have not expired. The Recovery rate is calculated as the recovered cases divided by the sum of recovered cases and total deceased cases.

The Illinois Department of Public Health reports 13,184 people have been tested across Deerfield (zip code 60015) as of Friday. That number represents an increase of 866 tests since Oct. 23. For further comparison, there was an increase of 993 tests between Oct. 16-23.

According to the Cook County Medical Examiner, 11 people have died due to COVID-19 in the Cook County portion of Deerfield since April 6. The last death was on Oct. 4.

Here is a breakdown of COVID-19 related deaths by date in Deerfield:

  • April 6 — 1

  • April 13 — 1

  • April 18 — 1

  • April 29 — 1

  • May 12 — 1

  • May 19 — 2

  • May 28 — 1

  • June 9 — 1

  • July 22 — 1

  • Oct. 4 — 1

According to the medical examiner, the age breakdown for the 11 deaths are: 80+ (4), 70-79 (4), 60-69 (2) and 40-49 (1). In addition, eight of the deceased were females and 2 was male.

As of Friday, there have been 37 coronavirus-related cases in the Cook County portion of Deerfield, according to the Cook County Department of Public Health. That marks an increase of 11 cases since Oct. 23. For further comparison there was an increase of three cases from Oct. 16-23.

The Illinois Department of Public Health reports there have been 2,245 confirmed coronavirus cases and 338 deaths in long-term care facilities in Lake County.

Here is a breakdown of cases and deaths at some of these facilities in Deerfield:

These numbers include both residents and employees of the long-term care facilities.

State health officials on Thursday reported a record 6,363 new cases of the coronavirus and 56 more deaths from COVID-19, the respiratory illness caused by the virus. The statewide totals now stand at 395,458 confirmed infections and 9,675 known deaths. Another 4,713 probable cases and

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55 New Coronavirus Cases Since Last Week In Northbrook

NORTHBROOK, IL — Like every other municipality in Illinois, the Village of Northbrook has been dealing with its own unique data points regarding the coronavirus. According to the Cook County Medical Examiner, 43 people have died due to COVID-19 in Northbrook since March 29. The last death in Northbrook was on Oct. 10. The most deaths in a single day since the pandemic began was three on April 28.

As of Friday, there have been 761 coronavirus-related cases in Northbrook, according to the Cook County Department of Public Health. That marks an increase of 55 cases since Oct. 23. For further comparison, there was an increase of 61 cases between Oct. 16-23.

(Cook County Department of Public Health)
(Cook County Department of Public Health)

In addition, 37,436 people have been tested across zip codes 60026 and 60062, according to the Illinois Department of Public Health. That number marks an increase of 2,900 tests since Oct.23. For further comparison, there was an increase in tests of 2,812 between Oct. 16-23.

Here is a breakdown of COVID-19 related deaths in Northbrook:

  • March 29 — 1

  • March 30 — 1

  • April 3 — 1

  • April 23 — 2

  • April 24 — 1

  • April 26 — 1

  • April 28 — 3

  • April 29 — 2

  • April 30 — 1

  • May 3 — 1

  • May 4 — 2

  • May 5 — 1

  • May 6 — 2

  • May 7 — 2

  • May 10 — 1

  • May 13 — 2

  • May 17 — 2

  • May 19 — 1

  • May 21 — 1

  • May 24 — 1

  • May 28 — 1

  • May 29 — 1

  • May 30 — 1

  • June 1 — 1

  • June 2 — 1

  • June 3 — 1

  • June 4 — 1

  • June 14 — 1

  • June 17 — 1

  • June 18 — 1

  • July 8 — 1

  • July 14 — 1

  • July 21 — 1

  • Oct. 10 — 1

According to the medical examiner, the age breakdown for the 43 deaths are: 80+ (28), 70-79 (6), 60-69 (7), 40-49 (1) and 30-39 (1).

As of Friday, the Cook County Department of Health is reporting 75,467 confirmed cases and 2,053 deaths since the pandemic began. The number of cases being reported has decreased from the total of 76,614 cases that were reported on Oct. 23. Patch is seeking clarification of the discrepancy in numbers. The number of deaths increased by 34 since Oct. 23.

The Illinois Department of Public Health is reporting 14,740 confirmed cases in Cook County long-term facilities and 2,432 deaths. That marks an increase of 247 cases and 24 deaths since Oct. 16. For comparison, there was an increase of 123 cases and 11 deaths between Oct. 16-23. In the past, the IDPH has twice temporarily removed some cases and deaths since Patch has been tracking these numbers, before including them back in at a later date.

Here is a breakdown of reported outbreak cases and deaths at some of these facilities in Northbrook:

  • Brookdale Northbrook — 5 cases, 3 deaths

  • Citadel of Northbrook — 41

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At least 5 hospitals have been hit this week

Federal agents warned Wednesday that a major ransomware assault is underway against U.S. hospitals, some of which have already been attacked by a shadowy band of cybercriminals.



Ransomware alert


© nevarpp/Getty Images/iStockphoto
Ransomware alert

Ransomware is an increasing threat to U.S. healthcare and has already cost hospitals tens of millions in recent years. A typical attack encrypts important data — such as patient records and billing information — until the hospital agrees to pay an exorbitant sum for ransom, usually in the form of Bitcoin or other digital currency.

Wednesday’s alert came from a joint federal task force that includes the FBI, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA). 

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At least five hospitals were hit with the ransomware attacks this week, the federal agencies said.

“CISA, FBI, and HHS have credible information of an increased and imminent cybercrime threat to U.S. hospitals and healthcare providers,” the advisory said. “CISA, FBI, and HHS are sharing this information to provide warning to healthcare providers to ensure that they take timely and reasonable precautions to protect their networks from these threats.”

‘Willing to pay’: Hospitals hit hardest by ransomware attacks, study says

The aggressive offensive by a Russian-speaking criminal gang coincides with the U.S. presidential election, though there was no immediate indication it was motivated by anything but profit.

“We are experiencing the most significant cyber security threat we’ve ever seen in the United States,” Charles Carmakal, chief technical officer of the cybersecurity firm Mandiant, said in a statement. He’s concerned that the group may deploy malware to hundreds of hospitals over the next few weeks.

Ransomware attempts jumped 50% in the last three months, over the first half of 2020, and hospitals and health care organizations were the hardest hit, according to a study earlier this year by Check Point research.

Typical attacks demand several hundred thousand dollars and some have demanded $5 million or more, the research group concluded. Hospitals are often targeted because criminals know they are more likely to pay than other businesses. That’s because hospitals can’t shut down for long without impacting patient care.

In June, the University of California San Francisco disclosed that it paid $1.14 million to ransomware attackers. In Germany, a woman died when a hospital under a ransomware attack couldn’t admit her. Universal Health Services, one of the nation’s largest health providers, was struck last week.

As a result, health care personnel reportedly began keeping records on paper as computer systems began failing over the weekend and some hospitals have sent incoming ambulances to other neighboring hospitals.

The percentage of healthcare organizations impacted by ransomware globally nearly doubled, from 2.3% in the second quarter to 4% in the third quarter. Healthcare was followed by manufacturing, software makers, government/military and insurance and legal firms.

The U.S. saw 313 attacks in the third quarter, compared to 158 in the previous quarter, very closely

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U.S. reports more than 500,000 cases in a week, a record, as the Trump administration says it ended the pandemic.

The United States reported a record of more than 500,000 new cases over the past week, as states and cities resorted to stricter new measures to contain the virus that is raging across the country, especially the American heartland.

The record was broken Tuesday, even as the Trump administration announced what it called its first-term scientific accomplishments, in a press release that included “ENDING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC” written in bold, capital letters.

The record reflects how quickly the virus is spreading. It took nearly three months for the first 500,000 coronavirus cases to be tallied in the United States — the first was confirmed on Jan. 21, and the country did not reach the half-million mark until April 11. Testing was severely limited in the early days of the pandemic.

The new restrictions range from a nightly business curfew in Newark, N.J., to a two-week stay-at-home order in El Paso, Texas, to a halt in indoor dining in Chicago.

Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker announced on Tuesday that he was stopping indoor dining and bar service in Chicago, effective at 12:01 a.m. Friday, Oct. 30.

The city joins New York and Wisconsin, states that earlier this month issued restrictions or outright bans on indoor dining in restaurants and bars to limit the spread of the coronavirus. The restrictions have been loudly opposed by a restaurant industry that has been decimated by the pandemic.

Chicago is now averaging more than twice as many coronavirus-related hospital admissions per day as it was a month ago, Mr. Pritzker’s office said, and the share of tests that are coming back positive has almost doubled since the beginning of October.

The U.S. has reported a record daily average of about 71,000 new cases over the past week, an increase of about 40 percent from the average two weeks earlier. Twenty states, including Illinois, have recorded their highest seven-day average of new cases, and three states (Tennessee, Wisconsin and Oklahoma) have set a record seven-day average for deaths. On Tuesday, Oklahoma and Wyoming broke single-day death records and Kentucky reported a new daily cases record.

Mr. Pritzker’s announcement follows a similar indoor dining ban that includes southern Cook County, just outside Chicago, which was announced Monday.

In Chicago, outdoor service will be allowed if tables are spaced six feet apart; reservations are required, and service shuts down at 11 p.m. All social gatherings in the city will be limited to 25 people or 25 percent of the venue’s capacity, whichever is less.

“We can’t ignore what is happening around us,” Mr. Pritzker said in a statement. “Because without action, this could look worse than anything we saw in the spring.”

Other communities around the country that have also recently tightened restrictions include:

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Nearly half a million Americans tested positive for Covid-19 In just the last week

Nearly half a million Americans tested positive for Covid-19 in just the last week as a fall surge of the contagious virus claws its way into every region of the country.



a boy wearing a hat: Nyasia Camara, medical assistant, checks in a person for a COVID-19 test at the drive-thru testing site at Mercy Health Anderson Hospital, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020. You must have an ID. They're open from 8am - 1pm and do about 70 tests each day. Over 5,000 deaths in Ohio have been reported during the pandemic, according to Ohio Department of Health.  Testing Political Signs Scenes For Wwlt


© Liz Dufour/The Enquirer/Imagn/USA Today
Nyasia Camara, medical assistant, checks in a person for a COVID-19 test at the drive-thru testing site at Mercy Health Anderson Hospital, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020. You must have an ID. They’re open from 8am – 1pm and do about 70 tests each day. Over 5,000 deaths in Ohio have been reported during the pandemic, according to Ohio Department of Health. Testing Political Signs Scenes For Wwlt

The past seven days have been marked by daunting coronavirus records and upticks, with 489,769 new cases reported since October 20. In the US, more than 8.7 million people have now been infected since the pandemic again, according to Johns Hopkins University.

The fall resurgence has led some local and state officials to rein in their reopening plans, as hospitalization numbers increase and states report case records. Still, public fatigue and political unwillingness to require masks and restrict gatherings — exemplified by the White House chief of staff’s frank admission that “we are not going to control the pandemic” — suggest worse days to come.

Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration, said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Monday that the US was at a tipping point where aggressive action could stem the worst of the pandemic.

“But we’re not going to do that and I understand why. There’s a lot of fatigue set in and a lot of policy resistance to taking strong action ahead of, you know, the spread,” he said.

“I think we’re right now at the cusp of what’s going to be exponential spread in parts of the country.”

At 69,967 new cases per day, the 7-day average of new cases is at the highest levels since the pandemic began, bringing the national death toll to 225,720, according to data from Johns Hopkins.

And state numbers are worrisome too: 37 states are reporting at least 10% more new cases in the past week compared to the previous week, and 21 states saw their highest 7-day averages on Sunday.

In all, 29 states have reported at least one record high day of new cases during the month of October, according to Johns Hopkins University data.

The increase in cases is not because of more testing but because of more infections, said Admiral Brett Giroir, the White House coronavirus task force testing czar, a position contrary to President Trump’s comments.

“Testing may be identifying some more cases, I think that’s clearly true, but what we’re seeing is a real increase in the numbers,” Giroir said Tuesday during a Washington Post live event.

Public health measures like mask wearing, avoiding crowds, physical distancing and hand hygiene make a difference, as they did in Arizona, Florida, Texas and across the Deep South, he said.

Some officials reinstate restrictions

Officials from New

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