Health Is The Most Important Wealth

If you're fortunate enough to have employer-provided health insurance, that narrows your options down to the plans that your employer offers. If you don't have coverage through your job, perhaps an organization or association that you belong to will allow you to buy health insurance through them at a group rate.

Another option is to check your local Obamacare health insurance marketplace to see if you qualify for an upfront premium credit, which would get you reduced premium costs. Even if you don't qualify for the credit right away, buying your health insurance through the marketplace means you may qualify for it when you file your tax return for the year.

If you can't, or won't, get health insurance from any of these sources, you'll have to fall back on buying a private plan. It will give you the widest range of options, but likely will be far more expensive.

Decide which type of policy to buy

Health insurance policies come in a variety of basic types, although you may not have access to all of these options through your preferred source. Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) are a very common type of health insurance policy. With an HMO, you're required to use healthcare providers within the policy's network, and you have to get a referral from your primary care physician in order to see a specialist.

Preferred Provider Organizations (PPOs) are also quite common. A PPO health insurance policy has a network, but you're not limited to in-network care – although using network providers is cheaper – and you don't need referrals to see specialists.

Exclusive Provider Organizations (EPOs) are a hybrid between HMOs and PPOs. You're required to stick to the plan's network, but don't need referrals for specialists. Finally, Point of Service (POS) plans are a less common option that are essentially the opposite of an EPO. You're not limited to the POS plan's network, but do need a referral to see a specialist.

Of the four common types of plans, an HMO or EPO tends to be cheaper than a PPO or POS with the same level of coverage. However, if network coverage is poor in your area, or you're uncomfortable limiting yourself to network providers, it may be worth paying a little more to get a PPO or POS policy.

More: Buyer beware: Long-term care costs are surging, survey says

More: Obamacare overhaul efforts are dead for now. What does that mean if you're an Obamacare consumer?

More: Trump says he'll negotiate with Democrats on health care plan

High deductible versus low deductible

All things being equal, the higher a plan's deductible is, the lower the monthly premiums will be. A high deductible means that you'll have to pay a lot of healthcare expenses yourself before the insurance policy kicks in, but if you have a few or no medical expenses in a given year, these plans can be a bargain. Very low medical expenses means that you probably won't surpass the deductible, even of a …