United Family Medicine Board Names Chief Executive Officer

ST. PAUL, Minn.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–United Family Medicine (UFM), a federally-qualified health center (FQHC) in St. Paul dedicated to meeting the health care demands of its community while contributing to the vitality of the region, announced today that its board of directors promoted Ann Nyakundi to CEO effective immediately.

Nyakundi joined the organization as interim CEO in October 2019, establishing priorities to re-design UFM’s care model to improve patients’ access to its services, maintain highest level health outcomes, and achieve compliance with the Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA), its federal regulator and primary funder. The resulting transformative changes, including migrating from its Allina-leased provider arrangement to hiring its own full complement of physicians, place UFM on track to attain regulatory compliance, while improving patients’ ability to see their doctors and health care team more quickly than ever before.

“It’s my desire and our collective responsibility to provide the best health care possible to every one of our patients, at the time that they need it, and we’re making numerous changes to meet this commitment,” said Nyakundi. “I’m grateful to UFM’s board of directors for the confidence it’s placed in me as its CEO, and excited to continue our work to place patients at the center of our response to community needs.”

Through the onset and continuing stressors of the Covid-19 pandemic, Nyakundi empowered her teams to improve access to care, such as the advanced practitioners who launched telemedicine as a service. This prompt response resulted in UFM regaining most of the patient visits that were delayed due to the pandemic, while significantly reducing UFM’s operating deficit and reliance on a part-time physician workforce. These cost efficiencies will allow UFM to expand dental and other services.

“Ann’s skill as a health care leader and her ethical and motivational orientation has steered United Family Medicine forward through the extreme challenges that its operating structure posed and the Covid-19 pandemic continues to present,” said Daymond Dean, UFM Executive Committee Board Member. “Our patients’ lives and well-being depend on their ability to receive the services that a community health center provides, and Ann is immeasurably qualified to ensure that UFM delivers those services and high-quality health care to our community.

Nyakundi pursued undergraduate and graduate medical anthropology and health care administration at the University of Michigan and University of Minnesota respectively, and brings to her role expertise in community health, philanthropy, strategic planning and health policy. Having experienced homelessness as a child without access to adequate options for high quality health care, inspired her career and commitment to public health. Most recently she volunteered for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) as a National Expert for the New Models of Primary Care Workforce and Financing Project, provided strategic support to the National Marrow Donor Program and worked within the Primary Care Services Division of the American Cancer Society.

About United Family Medicine

United Family Medicine, a federally qualified health center in St. Paul, Minnesota, provides high quality primary care, dental services and

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United Family Medicine Board Names Chief Executive Officer – Press Release

ST. PAUL, Minn.–(Business Wire)–United Family Medicine (UFM), a federally-qualified health center (FQHC) in St. Paul dedicated to meeting the health care demands of its community while contributing to the vitality of the region, announced today that its board of directors promoted Ann Nyakundi to CEO effective immediately.

Nyakundi joined the organization as interim CEO in October 2019, establishing priorities to re-design UFM’s care model to improve patients’ access to its services, maintain highest level health outcomes, and achieve compliance with the Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA), its federal regulator and primary funder. The resulting transformative changes, including migrating from its Allina-leased provider arrangement to hiring its own full complement of physicians, place UFM on track to attain regulatory compliance, while improving patients’ ability to see their doctors and health care team more quickly than ever before.

“It’s my desire and our collective responsibility to provide the best health care possible to every one of our patients, at the time that they need it, and we’re making numerous changes to meet this commitment,” said Nyakundi. “I’m grateful to UFM’s board of directors for the confidence it’s placed in me as its CEO, and excited to continue our work to place patients at the center of our response to community needs.”

Through the onset and continuing stressors of the Covid-19 pandemic, Nyakundi empowered her teams to improve access to care, such as the advanced practitioners who launched telemedicine as a service. This prompt response resulted in UFM regaining most of the patient visits that were delayed due to the pandemic, while significantly reducing UFM’s operating deficit and reliance on a part-time physician workforce. These cost efficiencies will allow UFM to expand dental and other services.

“Ann’s skill as a health care leader and her ethical and motivational orientation has steered United Family Medicine forward through the extreme challenges that its operating structure posed and the Covid-19 pandemic continues to present,” said Daymond Dean, UFM Executive Committee Board Member. “Our patients’ lives and well-being depend on their ability to receive the services that a community health center provides, and Ann is immeasurably qualified to ensure that UFM delivers those services and high-quality health care to our community.

Nyakundi pursued undergraduate and graduate medical anthropology and health care administration at the University of Michigan and University of Minnesota respectively, and brings to her role expertise in community health, philanthropy, strategic planning and health policy. Having experienced homelessness as a child without access to adequate options for high quality health care, inspired her career and commitment to public health. Most recently she volunteered for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) as a National Expert for the New Models of Primary Care Workforce and Financing Project, provided strategic support to the National Marrow Donor Program and worked within the Primary Care Services Division of the American Cancer Society.

About United Family Medicine

United Family Medicine, a federally qualified health center in St. Paul, Minnesota, provides high quality primary care, dental services and behavioral health

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MHRA Grants HAE Patients Early Access to BioCryst’s Berotralstat in United Kingdom

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C., Oct. 30, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — BioCryst Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: BCRX) today announced that the United Kingdom’s Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has granted oral, once-daily berotralstat a positive scientific opinion through the Early Access to Medicines Scheme (EAMS).

Under the EAMS, hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients in the UK aged 12 years and older can gain access to berotralstat for the routine prevention of recurrent attacks of HAE before the drug is granted marketing authorization by the European Commission (EC).

HAE is a serious, and potentially life-threatening, rare genetic illness characterised by periodic episodes of acute swelling of the skin, pharynx, larynx, gastrointestinal tract, genitals and/or extremities.

Medicines included in the EAMS are those that have a high unmet need, are intended to treat, diagnose or prevent seriously debilitating or life-threatening conditions where there are no adequate treatment options, and are likely to offer significant advantage over methods currently used in the UK. Under the scheme, the MHRA provides a scientific opinion on the benefit-risk balance of the medicine, based on the data available when the EAMS submission was made.

“There are many patients in the UK that don’t have a realistic option for effective HAE prophylaxis. The addition of berotralstat through the EAMS will bring a much needed option for HAE patients suffering with this debilitating disease,” said Dr. Sorena Kiani, Consultant Immunologist at Royal London Hospital, London.

“HAE patients around the world are waiting for an oral, once-daily therapy to prevent attacks and reduce their burden of therapy. With this decision by the MHRA, the wait for many HAE patients in the UK can end sooner,” said Jon Stonehouse, chief executive officer of BioCryst.

The European Medicines Agency (EMA) is reviewing the marketing authorisation application (MAA) for berotralstat under the centralized procedure. An opinion from the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) is expected approximately 12 months from MAA validation, which the company announced on March 30, 2020.

About BioCryst Pharmaceuticals
BioCryst Pharmaceuticals discovers novel, oral, small-molecule medicines that treat rare diseases in which significant unmet medical needs exist and an enzyme plays a key role in the biological pathway of the disease. BioCryst has several ongoing development programs including ORLADEYO(berotralstat), an oral treatment for hereditary angioedema, BCX9930, an oral Factor D inhibitor for the treatment of complement-mediated diseases, galidesivir, a potential treatment for COVID-19, Marburg virus disease and Yellow Fever, and BCX9250, an ALK-2 inhibitor for the treatment of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva. RAPIVAB® (peramivir injection), a viral neuraminidase inhibitor for the treatment of influenza, is BioCryst’s first approved product and has received regulatory approval in the U.S., Canada, Australia, Japan, Taiwan, Korea and the European Union. Post-marketing commitments for RAPIVAB are ongoing. For more information, please visit the Company’s website at www.BioCryst.com.

Forward-Looking Statements
This press release contains forward-looking statements, including statements regarding future results, performance or achievements. These statements are identified by use of terms such as “expect,” “will,” and similar words, although

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‘It Has Hit Us With a Vengeance’: Coronavirus Surges Again Across the United States

“We were hoping we had escaped the Covid-19,” Mayor Tim Mahoney of Fargo, a practicing surgeon, said in an interview. “Now we’re just like everybody else in the country. It has hit us with a vengeance.

“We kind of thought we’d outsmart it, and you can’t outsmart this virus.”

In other parts of the country, officials are also returning to another tried-and-true method of containing the virus: stay-at-home orders. On Tuesday, local health officials ordered students at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor to stay in their residences except for essential activities effective immediately, in an effort to control an escalating community outbreak.

Since Oct. 12, cases associated with the university have made up about 61 percent of confirmed and probable local infections, said Jimena Loveluck, the health officer for Washtenaw County, who warned that many cases have been tied to parties and other big gatherings.

“During the day, on campus, everyone’s fine and following the rules,” said Emma Stein, a senior news editor at The Michigan Daily, the student paper, who is now confined at home with her eight roommates. “But at night, on weekends, they don’t.”

The order could leave the campus unusually quiet ahead of Oct. 31, when the university is expected to play its first home football game of the season against its biggest in-state rival, Michigan State. For added deterrence, health officials are considering an extra kick: Within the week, officials said, the health department may start fining people who violate the order to stay at home.

In a sign of how quickly the virus is spreading in many parts of the Midwest and the Great Plains, infections recently overtook a private nursing home in northern Kansas.

Source Article

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Coronavirus spike: United States and Europe react to record numbers and new restrictions

In Europe, new restrictions and shutdowns are coming into place. Last week, the continent overtook the United States in cases per capita. Public health officials warned of an accelerating and possibly “exponential” rise in infections, with confirmed cases in the 53 European nations, as categorized by the World Health Organization, climbing from 6 million to 7 million in just ten days.

Without effective countermeasures, the WHO warned, daily coronavirus-related deaths in Europe could rise to five times their April peak. The dramatic resurgence of the virus across the continent punctured whatever illusions Europeans had that they had weathered the worst of the pandemic. Countries like Spain and Italy, which welcomed back holiday goers over the summer, are again among the front-runners in overall cases.

“Europe clamped down hard on the pandemic this spring, and the payoff was a summer that was more normal than many people had expected,” wrote my colleague Michael Birnbaum. “But by the end of August, infections were again on the rise, with more cases concentrated among younger people — who perhaps considered the virus a more remote threat. Now it is spreading to their parents and grandparents, and medical systems are beginning to feel the strain.”

Increased overall testing partially explains the spike, but experts also fear a steady uptick in deaths and hospitalizations. “The most worrying thing is that the number of cases is rising very quickly among the elderly, which will quickly result in many new patients arriving in hospitals,” French Prime Minister Jean Castex said Thursday. France imposed curfews on Paris and eight other major cities over the weekend.

East Asia is not experiencing a similarly brutal wave of infections, a sign that the efficiency and enduring vigilance of the response in countries like Vietnam, South Korea and Taiwan continue to set the standard for how to control the virus. The situation in Europe, though, further complicates the picture: Mask-wearing is perhaps more widespread in Spain than any other European country, but it still suffers one of the worst outbreaks on the continent.

Nor does it seem that any society has achieved anything close to herd immunity. “One of the hopes in some quarters had been that herd immunity could provide some protection, with places hard-hit in the spring sheltered from the worst of any resurgence in the virus due to increased antibody levels,” noted the Financial Times. “Unfortunately, that has proved not to be the case so far, with many of the centers of the outbreak in the spring also suffering the worst in the autumn, both at the country and subnational region level.”

The virus is spreading within countries to areas largely unscathed earlier this year, be it in the upper Midwest and northern plains of the United States or the southern Italian region of Campania, where daily detected cases are now five times higher than a peak in March, according to my colleagues. Authorities there shuttered schools in a bid to rein in the spike and stave off the disastrous

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Allina to pull medical residents out of United Family Medicine clinic on St. Paul’s West Seventh



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© Provided by Twin Cities Pioneer Press
(Thinkstock)

For 50 years, the United Family Medicine clinic on St. Paul’s West Seventh Street has catered to the working poor and underinsured patients, including today many East African immigrants and neighborhood residents.

And the nonprofit health center has done so hand-in-hand with Allina Health, a 12-hospital, 90-clinic health network that has provided the majority of the clinic’s physicians, 21 medical residents, electronic records, lab services and even their phone line.

Now, Allina is in the process of pulling out all 21 medical residents and finding another location near United Hospital where the medical residents can complete their three-year rotations in family medicine.

By the end of the year, the faculty physicians are expected to follow them, leaving the clinic nearly devoid of primary care doctors. Physician assistants and nurse practitioners are expected to pick up the slack under the clinic’s new model of team-based care.

“The pandemic certainly has accelerated changes in the health care system,” said Sara Criger, president of United Hospital, who said medical residents and faculty had complained of patient scheduling and other issues at the clinic, hurting the reputation of Allina’s residency program.

Criger added: “There were problems that United Family Medicine needed to address. As the clinic made changes, we had to determine if they meet our requirements or not, and it became apparent that they did not.”

The deteriorating relationship between the community health clinic and Allina has led to finger-pointing on at least three sides.

CALLS FOR CEO TO RESIGN

Alarmed by a lengthy period of employee furloughs and other emergency management steps, a group of former United Family Medicine board members and West Seventh Street advocates have laid blame on the health clinic’s leadership and called for them to step down.

Those advocates include former United Family Medicine board chair Andrea Marboe, longtime West Seventh Street activist Marit Brock and former St. Paul City Council Member Dave Thune.

“We’ve totally lost confidence in the program and they should stop funding them,” said Thune, who is circulating a petition calling for major funders to sever ties and for United Family Medicine Chief Executive Officer Ann Nyakundi to resign.

“We want a neighborhood clinic with doctor-patient relationships, real family physicians that follow you to the hospital,” Thune said. “She walked in and six months later turned the clinic upside down. We just prefer she leave now.”

Nyakundi and Jonathan Watson, CEO of the Minnesota Association of Community Health Centers, said operations at the clinic have stabilized since the start of the pandemic.

“When I inherited the clinic, our 2020 budget at the start of the year was actually worse than it is now,” said Nayakundi, who stepped in as CEO last October after the previous CEO resigned. “We’ve done a really good job efficiently navigating the pandemic and staffing to demand. We temporarily had furloughs, but we’ve brought all of the staff back, and we’re actually in a period of growth.”

Critics, including former board

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Allina to pull medical residents out of United Family Medicine clinics on St. Paul’s West Seventh



(Thinkstock)


© Provided by Twin Cities Pioneer Press
(Thinkstock)

For 50 years, the United Family Medicine clinic on St. Paul’s West Seventh Street has catered to the working poor and underinsured patients, including today many East African immigrants and residents.

And the nonprofit health center has done so hand-in-hand with Allina Health, a 12-hospital, 90-clinic health network that has provided the majority of the clinic’s physicians, 21 medical residents, electronic records, lab services and even their phone line.

Now, Allina is in the process of pulling out all 21 medical residents and finding another location near United Hospital where the students can complete their three-year rotations in family medicine.

By the end of the year, the faculty physicians are expected to follow them, leaving the clinic nearly devoid of primary care doctors. Physician assistants and nurse practitioners are expected to pick up the slack in the clinic’s new team-based care model.

“The pandemic certainly has accelerated changes in the healthcare system,” said Sara Criger, president of United Hospital, who said medical residents and faculty had complained of patient scheduling and other issues at the clinic, hurting the reputation of Allina’s residency program.

Criger added: “There were problems that United Family Medicine needed to address. As the clinic made changes, we had to determine if they meet our requirements or not, and it became apparent that they did not.”

The deteriorating relationship between the community health clinic and Allina has led to finger-pointing on at least three sides.

CALLS FOR CEO TO RESIGN

Alarmed by a lengthy period of employee furloughs and other emergency management steps, a group of former United Family Medicine board members and West Seventh Street advocates have laid blame on the health clinic’s leadership and called for them to step down.

Those advocates include former United Family Medicine board chair Andrea Marboe, longtime West Seventh Street activist Marit Brock, former St. Paul City Council Member Dave Thune and St. Paul Public Works Director Sean Kershaw, who was recently a nonprofit leader.

“We’ve totally lost confidence in the program and they should stop funding them,” said Thune, who is circulating a petition calling for major funders to sever ties and for United Family Medicine Chief Executive Officer Ann Nyakundi to resign.

“We want a neighborhood clinic with doctor-patient relationships, real family physicians that follow you to the hospital,” Thune said. “She walked in and six months later turned the clinic upside down. We just prefer she leave now.”

Nyakundi and Jonathan Watson, CEO of the Minnesota Association of Community Health Centers, said operations at the clinic have stabilized since the start of the pandemic.

“When I inherited the clinic, our 2020 budget at the start of the year was actually worse than it is now,” said Nayakundi, who stepped in as CEO last October after the previous CEO resigned. “We’ve done a really good job efficiently navigating the pandemic and staffing to demand. We temporarily had furloughs, but we’ve brought all of the staff back, and we’re actually

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