A Brief on the Use of Essential Oils With Traditional Chinese Medicine

The use of essential oils based on Chinese medicine has proven to be an exceptional modality in gaining maximum results with clients. This ancient healing system naturally adopts the use of essential oils.

This case study will give the reader an overview of how to work with the Spleen and Stomach (Earth Element).

Two of the major pathogenic factors in Chinese medicine are Damp and Cold. These influences cause stagnation of Qi. In short, when there is stagnant qi the energy does not flow properly and the body will experience signs and symptoms that mirror this.

According to Chinese medicine a primary function of the Earth element (Spleen and Stomach) is to transform and transport postnatal qi. Our postnatal qi is associated with diet, which includes what we absorb from our environment. (Gian 2015) (1) TCM physiology states, that the Spleen ascends the pure postnatal qi and the stomach descends the impure. So, if the Qi is deficient the Spleen will not be able to do its proper job and this causes stagnation. A cardinal sign of Spleen Qi Deficiency and Stagnation is flatulence. This was the case with one of the clients, a 35 year old woman.

The below case study illustrates the healing protocols in dealing with flatulence as a symptom of Spleen Qi Deficiency accompanied by the secondary complaint of low libido.

A client had the chief complaint of excessive flatulence that worsened with cold and damp weather. Her flatulence was hard to control, and made her feel embarrassed when she was not home. The frequency could be high, as in 1 to 2 minutes per time for 10 minutes. It further complicated the condition when she drank black tea, green tea, coffee, iced tea – both hot and cold.

To a great extent, the healing protocols were done within a TCM context. I successfully treated the symptoms with the blend below:

2 drops of Ginger (Zingiber officinale)

1 drop of Cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum)

1 drop of Spike Lavender (Lavandula latifolia)

1 drop of Clary Sage (Salvia sclarea)

1 drop of Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) 10 ml Olive Oil

Ginger is carminative, which can help to prevent gas. It can also warm the body and improve the circulation. The high ester content is beneficial to prevent gas. It is warming, so it can help improve circulation and bring the Qi upwards. It aids digestion and tones the body. I added Spike Lavender for the purpose of removing dampness from the lungs. Clary sage is a very calming oil which can calm the CNS. It helps to relieve the stress and anxiety of my client. Additionally, it can stimulate the immune system – which can bring the body back to normal. Lavender is a calming oil which can help ease the digestive tension (which could be a leading cause to the gas emission problem of the client).

Ginger is a warming oil that assists in strengthening the Spleen and warms the Kidneys. Ginger is integral for two reasons, one …

Traditional Chinese Medicine to Treat and Heal Tinnitus

Chinese Medicine believes that there are several types of tinnitus. These are related to different energetic issues associated with the energy flow and proper function of several organs including the kidney, liver, and gallbladder. There are always several ways that Traditional Chinese Medicine can repair a symptom or disease. The ancient art of Tuina can be used to relieve hearing loss and tinnitus. Tuina is oriental body work that may seem similar to massage with hard pressure hand movements on muscles or tendons combined with acupressure. Medical Qi Gong may also heal tinnitus for some people. Auricular acupuncture and scalp acupuncture are other options for treat tinnitus in Traditional Chinese Medicine. Moxa may be added as part of an overall treatment plan.

It is important to look at other factors which can cause or contribute to hearing loss and tinnitus. Heavy metal toxins can be a very big factor. These should have diagnostic testing and be treated with oral chelation or IV chelation in very severe cases. Oral chelation requires a longer period of time and is more gentle on the body. IV chelation requires electrolyte supplementation. It is important to have vitamin and antioxidants to support the body when undergoing any type of chelation. Carbonated beverages or beer may be connected with higher levels of aluminum in your body. Cigarettes may also contribute to ear ringing. Chelation may require four to nine months for the detoxification of heavy metals and toxins from your body. The use of far infrared sauna during this time can speed your detoxification process. Do not do more than two per week when taking chelation therapy. It is also important to drink pure water and flush your kidneys during this time.

Chinese Patent formulas that are useful in treating this disease include:

• Wai Gan Fen Re Xing (respiratory infection),

• Er Long Zuo Ci Wan (for aging of kidney and liver)

• Shen Jing Shai Ruo Wan (for insomnia, fatigue, insomnia, and tinnitus)

• Jiang Ya Wan (for dizziness, hypertension, and tinnitus)

• Da Bu Yin Wan (for nights sweats, hyperthyroidism, and tinnitus)

• An Shen Bu Xin Wan (for insomnia, memory, palpitations, and tinnitus)

• Shen jing Kui Xu Xing (kidney dysfunction)

• Pi Qi Xu Ruo Xing (abnormal spleen function)

The Japanese herbal formula Yoku-kan-san may be useful in treating tinnitus.

The addition of scalp acupuncture is great and may speed the healing process if the tinnitus is due to a deficiency condition. If the problem is an excess condition, body acupuncture and asian bodywork may be more effective. Try medical qi gong and qi gong for healing tinnitus, hearing loss, and eye problems.

© Dr R Stone, MD-India

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Hematoma Treatment – Traditional & Alternative Medicine

In this article I'm going to talk about traditional hematoma treatment as well as alternative medicine.

A hematoma takes places when blood builds outside a blood vessel and they can happen anywhere. It usually happens when there is an accident or trauma, such as falling off a ramp when skateboarding or getting hit by a post office truck.

Other causes could be drugs, diseases, high blood pressure and cancer. You might be wondering, how do you know if you have a hematoma.

Well the skin can change colors such as become darker, there could be pain, inflammation and swelling.

Traditional treatment usually involves RICE Have you heard of RICE Before? It stands for rest which is when the body heals itself, so many times it might just be the best medicine. Elevation, ice and compression which all reduce the inflammation and improve the healing.

If the injury is really red, there is pus coming out of it or if it's in an eye, it's best to see a doctor.

Plus if you notice hematomas occurring without any injury it's best to get it checked by a doctor because it could be serious.

If you are wondering if there are better treatments or alternative medicines the good news is that there are tons.

One of my favorite things is coconut oil, which has millions of uses. In a study at the US National Library of Medicine they took rats and split them into groups. Some received coconut oil and some did not. Wounds treated with coconut oil healed much faster.

Another idea is bromalean which can help a lot. In a study by the third medical university at China researchers took 16 pigs and shot them with high velocity rifles. They divided them into groups and the group that received bromalean healed much more.

The way it works is it increases the flow of blood and oxygen to the wound and reduces inflammation. Plus it activates growth factors, which are needed for healing.

If that wasn't enough it helps with burns. In Bursheba Israel they took pigs, burned a few and bromalean really improved the healing. It's seems like they have something against pigs right? They are shooting them and burning them, poor pigs.

If you really want to heal a hematoma or a skin injury believe it or not they even have a stem cell gun. It takes an hour and a half to isolate the cells and spray the skin. Then it only takes a few days for the treatment to work and the skin is brand new again.

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Traditional Chinese Medicine: Acupuncture Points and Charts

What Are the Acupuncture Points?

The English translation of ‘acupuncture points’ is not very accurate. Acupuncture is one of the many healing methods used in traditional Chinese Medicine. It inserts fine needles into the sensitive points on the body to stimulate Jingluos (meridians) to cure diseases. These sensitive points are called ‘Shuxue’ or ‘Xuewei’ in Chinese Medicine, meaning ‘the transmitting points’. However, this name has been so widely used, there is no point to change it now for our discussion.

Acupuncture points are the responsive points or sensitive points on the meridians and other parts of the body. They are the special locations where energy is transmitted between the inner structures and the surface of the body. These spots can reflect disease or unhealthy conditions by giving forth painful sensations when touched or pressed. These points are (but not limited to) where the therapists apply treatments. When the body is deficient of positive energy, negative or harmful energy will be able to invade the body through these spots, causing illness. Stimulating the related points can boost and mobilize the positive energy, balance Yin/Yang energy and cure the disease. There are three types of points:

1. 14-main-meridian points

2. Extraordinary points

3.’Yes’ points.

The 14-main-meridian points are the spots on the 12 main meridians plus the spots on the governor and conception vessels. Each spot has a unique name and a fixed location. They are the main acupuncture points. The extraordinary points are the points that have names and fixed locations. These locations are not on a particular meridian. ‘Yes’ points are also called pain points, but they don’t have names or fixed locations. They are the sensitive points related to the diseases. The ‘yes ‘name came from a story. When treating a patient, the doctor pressed a spot unintentionally, and the patient uttered ‘oh yes’.

There are approximately 360 acupuncture points in total on the human body. With so many tiny points to remember, one can easily be intimidated. As a matter of fact, for self -healing and caring purposes, we don’t have to memorize all these points. We only need to remember roughly 20 most used and effective points. If you need to use more points, just look for them using the meridian and acupuncture point charts. Each point has a unique and meaningful name, which gives some key information about this particular point, such as main function, usage, location, or other. In English, the English spelling of the Chinese names are directly used. For people who don’t understand Chinese, it is hard to comprehend the significance of each name and, therefore hard to remember all the foreign sounding names.The format of the international symbols for acupuncture points is fairly easy. Since most of the points belong to one specific meridian (Jing), it only makes sense that their symbols are associated with those meridians. You can take two abbreviation letters of that meridian’s name and number all the points along the way, from the starting point to the end …

Sadness, Grief, Anger, Resentment – How Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine Can Help

In life there are many genuine reasons to grieve, to feel sad, to get angry or to feel resentful. The death of a loved one, the loss of a job, being disregarded in your work or personal life, the ongoing challenges of the material world that we live in, not feeling fulfilled, dysfunctional relationships, broken relationships, the loss of a pet… the list is almost endless.

What makes the situation even more difficult is that in today’s society we are often under so much stress that the emotion is not given permission to vent or surface properly, which can lead to other difficult emotions and stronger feelings of sadness, grief, anger etc. and it is a self perpetuating situation.

A Look At Sadness, Grieving & Western Medicine

If you are sad or grieving and you live in a "western civilised country" then you may consider going to a doctor. Friends and family may be supportive, but as the emotion/s persists you and your support group may feel there is no better option. In many cases, depending on how the patient expresses these emotions, the doctor may decide to prescribe anti-depressants to help them.

There may be some cases where as a temporary measure this can appear to help, and unfortunately many other cases where it is the slippery slope to a dependency on prescription drugs.

Of course there are also doctors who may recommend counselling or some form of talk therapy, to give the patient the opportunity to deal with and vent the emotion/s.

Regardless of the route that is chosen, Western medicine does not recognise that certain emotions are linked to specific organs, and can therefore have either a detrimental effect or a balancing effect, depending on the degree and type of emotion experienced.

Traditional Chinese Medicine Recognises Relationships Between Emotions And Organs

However traditional Chinese medicine does recognise the relationship between emotions and organs, and it is an integral aspect of how both traditional Chinese acupuncturists and herbalists practice.

Even if you have no interest in going to a traditional Chinese medical practitioner, I have found that even by observing shifts in general well being, when you understand the inter-relationships between emotions and organs, can give some helpful indications of how to begin re-balancing these imbalances.

For example, doing something creative that you enjoy can give you these type of signals. Walking in nature can also do the same, as can reading something enriching. These are only a handful of examples of potentially balancing activities. Please note that although these are helpful, it would be highly recommended to visit a good practitioner who will help you re-balance thoroughly.

In traditional Chinese Medicine there are 7 emotions which are:

1. Anger

2. Anxiety

3. Fear

4. Fright

5. Grief

6. Joy

7. Pensiveness

Each of these is associated to a different organ or organs. Let’s look very briefly at what these are.

1. Anger which encompasses anger as we know it, as well as resentment, frustration and irritability is …

Holistic Healthcare versus Traditional Western Medicine

The Western medicine community recently asked the question: Will Alternative Healthcare, a.k.a. Holistic, Metaphysical, Energy or Mind, Body, Spirit healing and Western Medicine (WM) merge? This question implies there is reason to wonder and/or we need to consider the benefits a merger might create. The consideration of merging Holistic, Metaphysical, Energy or Mind, Body, Spirit healing and Western Medicine is analogues to comparing apples to oranges. The only comparison between apples and oranges is that they are both fruit–but the comparison ends there. Holistic, Metaphysical, Energy or Mind, Body, Spirit Healing and Western Medicine is diametrically polar opposites with nothing in common, except the subject (you). I will explain.

In order to understand the ideology of Western Medicine, you need to examine the language used by doctors and researchers. Their choice of words reveals their belief systems and the models they use to understand the way they think healing works. When observing the state of Western Medicine and the unprecedented influence of pharmaceuticals and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, an interesting paradox arises. The drug companies claim that pharmaceuticals and OTC can do wonders for people: lower cholesterol, end clinical depression, reverse osteoporosis, eliminate allergies, cure cancer, cure MS, calm children and many other similar promises.

If prescription or OTC drugs are so good for people, where are all the healthy medicated customers? The truth is, there aren’t, any. There’s nobody taking twelve prescriptions or OTC drugs with a clean bill of health. In fact, the more prescriptions a person takes, the worse their overall health. And if you approach the healthiest people you can find and ask what prescription drugs or OTC drugs they’re taking in order to be so healthy, they’ll give you a confused look: Healthy people don’t take prescription or OTC drugs!

This sort of language is not uncommon from researchers in Western Medicine. They perceive the human body as a battleground on which wars are waged against invaders (viruses, bacterial infections and tumors). Beginning with the Victorian era, Western society has become addicted to quick fixes and results with no effort. Western Medicine has in some instances provided this result. When Western Medicine doesn’t produce a ‘quick fix’ result the answer is: “Sorry, it couldn’t be helped–the surgery was a success, the patient died.” It is interesting to note the AMA reports a dismal success rate–approximately 250,000 people die each year due to misdiagnosis and/or the treatment does little or nothing to improve the person’s health. In other words these people didn’t die due to an illness they died due to the wrong treatment.

Western Medicine’s theory and doctrines fail to recognize that diseases are not separate from the person. In fact every disease can be more accurately called an expression of the patient’s lifestyle, beliefs, and energies. Cancer is not a tumor, for example: it is a systemic disorder that can only truly be cured by helping to support the body, not by attacking it with chemical bombs or knives. The tumor is merely one physical …

All About Traditional Chinese Medicine

Traditional Chinese medicine is an alternative to contemporary medicine. The treatment method corrects imbalances in the body and works in different ways that include:

  • Addressing the environment and the external factors of the patient.
  • Helping the patients relate to the internal emotions in a healthier way.
  • Improving the lifestyle of the patients. This includes promoting better diet and exercise.

The traditional Chinese medicine affects different areas of the body but it focuses on only a few of these areas. The areas include: large intestine, gallbladder, small intestine, lung, liver, spleen, kidneys, and heart.

Benefits of traditional Chinese medicine

The treatment option comes with many advantages that include:

Reduced inflammation: The herbs and mushrooms used in the treatment have antioxidant, antiapoptotic, autophagic, and anti-inflammatory effects on the body. When you take the herbs, you have reduced levels of oxidative stress and inflammation thus you protect the body cells, tissues, and organs from developing diseases.

Reduction of chronic pain and headache: The use of acupuncture and acupressure plays a vital role in managing pain brought about by arthritis and other medical conditions. Experts have also found that treatment methods such as eating a healthy diet and tai chi aid in reducing chronic tension headaches.

Hormonal balance: Research studies show that the herbs used in the treatment contain anti-inflammatory and antioxidants that improve the functions within the endocrine and central nervous system. This aids in improving the healing abilities of the body and balances the hormones such as insulin, estrogen, cortisol, and testosterone.

Improvement of the health of the liver: Since traditional Chinese medicine advocates that you take a healthy diet, the diet aids in improving the health of the liver. Some of the best foods that you should take to improve the health of your liver include: sweet potatoes, healthy fats, spices rich in ginger and garlic, and herbs. You should avoid fried foods, sugary drinks, and snacks, refined oils, alcohol, and processed carbohydrates.

Tips to consider when engaging in traditional Chinese medicine

For you to have a great experience with the treatment method, you need to consider a number of tips. Before you settle on a given practitioner, always take your time to research him/her and ensure that he/she is reputable. Experts recommend that you visit a number of facilities and take a look at the displayed certifications. If there are no certifications, you should stay away from the practitioner.

While the herbs are natural, you should take them under maximum supervision. You shouldn’t take them if suffering from a medical condition or when pregnant. You should avoid medications from an unknown company as they might be containing dangerous additives, lead, cadmium, mercury, and traces of other heavy metals.

To get the most from the treatment method, you should incorporate different lifestyle and preventative habits such as exercising, eating a healthy diet, getting enough sleep, and taking beneficial supplements.

Conclusion

This is what you need to know about traditional Chinese medicine. You should remember that the medications …

The Affordable Alternative to Traditional Individual Health Insurance

As a way to begin let’s define what I mean by traditional health insurance. The traditional health insurance policy is composed of:

The deductible – This is the amount that you have to pay for a medical event before your health insurance will start to pay. In today’s world that deductible is often $3000 or more.

The coinsurance – After the deductible is met most policies require that the insured pay a percentage of all medical costs up to a maximum. Usually the insured pays anywhere from 20% to as much as 50% of every dollar billed.

The copays – In an attempt to make routine health care accessible many policies include a copay for doctor visits and prescriptions in lieu of having to meet a deductible. An example of this is the $10 office visit copay.

Maximum Out-Of-Pocket Costs – This is the most that an insured can expect to pay regardless of how large the medical bills are. As a general rule the maximum out-of-pocket costs for an individual are limited to around $7000. This can be a very misleading number because it assumes that all of your providers are in your network. If they are out of network your costs can be significantly higher.

And finally the “Network” – Virtually every traditional individual health insurance policy is tied to a network of providers. The narrower the healthcare network, the lower the premium. There is too much wrong with “networks” for this article. Suffice it to say that “networks” are the enemy of the healthcare consumer (you).

The Problem Facing Working Americans

The problem is simple: health insurance premiums are too high for most working Americans in the absence of a subsidy and when combined with extremely high deductible and out of pocket costs, healthcare becomes unaffordable. Let’s look at a couple of examples right here in North Carolina.

A non-smoking couple ages 62 and 63 find that their lowest premium option with BCBS of NC is $1999 a month for a $13,300 family deductible with no copays. A plan with a $7000 deductible and $25 office visit copays would cost $2682 per month.

Assuming the least expensive plan the annual cost would be $23,988 annually. And if either person had a medical event such as cancer, the actual cost for healthcare would be $37,288. You have to ask: “Why even have health insurance?”

A non-smoking 30 year old couple found that the least expensive plan would cost $787.84 a month for a $13,300 family deductible with no copays. The least expensive plan that included copays was $1056.88 but had a $7000 deductible and the most restrictive network. Assuming the least expensive plan, should either member of this young couple have a medical event their total annual cost (deductible + premium) would be $16,454.08. That is a devastating amount of money for a young couple.

The simple solution to this problem is a Fixed Benefit Health Insurance. Unlike a major medical policy where the policy pays for all …

How Traditional Chinese Health Beliefs and Chinese Culture Influence Health and Illness?

Traditional Chinese health beliefs adopt a holistic view emphasizing the importance of environmental factors in increasing risk of disease. According to Quah (1985), these factors influence the balance of body’s harmony, yin and yang. These are two opposite but complementary forces and, together with qi (vital energy), they control the universe and explain the relationship between people and their surroundings. Imbalance in these two forces, or in the qi, results in illness.

In order to restore the balance, traditional remedial practices may be needed. For example, excess `hot’ energy can be counterbalanced by cooling herbal teas, and vice versa. These beliefs are deeply ingrained among the Chinese, and have been found to be unchanged following migration to Singapore.

Lee, et. al. (2004), found that patients with specific chronic diseases, namely arthritis, musculoskeletal diseases and stroke, were more likely to use Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). This was strongly determined by the ‘chronic disease triad’, perceived satisfaction with care and cultural health beliefs.

Hence the use of TCM is not associated with the quality of doctor-patient interaction. Astin (1998) also agreed that it was seen as being more compatible with the patients’ values, spiritual and religious philosophy, or beliefs regarding the nature and meaning of health and illness.

In traditional Chinese culture, taking medication is thought to be aversive, hence medications tend to be taken only until symptoms are relieved and then discontinued; if symptoms are not obvious, medications will probably never be taken.

Apart from parental cultural beliefs, minor side effects of certain antibiotics such as stomach upset may contribute to the poor adherence of medication. The use of “leftover”, “shared” antibiotics and over-the-counter purchase of antibiotics by parents are common situations in the community.

They think that their children suffer from the same illnesses judging by the similar symptoms, so they would give the “leftover” or “shared” antibiotics to their children and only bring them to their doctors if there is no improvement (Chang & Tang, 2006). This may cause their conditions to deteriorate and may necessitate aggressive treatments later which may have unnecessary side effects.

However, there are small groups of Chinese who also blamed ill-health or misfortunes on supernatural forces, or on divine retribution, or on the malevolence of a ‘witch’ or ‘sorcerer’ (Helman, 1994). Such groups will usually seek cures from their religions.

In Singapore, the Ministry of Health has drawn up the TCM Practitioners’ Ethical Code and Ethical Guidelines to prevent any unscrupulous practitioners from preying on their patients and taking advantage of their beliefs, for example, molesting ignorant patients.

The degree of acculturation has been evidenced in the following case. An old man was brought into our hospital with a week-long history of malaise, nausea and vomiting, and sudden jaundice. He was diagnosed to have an obstructive mass in the liver.

A biopsy revealed hepatocellular carcinoma. The serological test suggested chronic active hepatitis B. When the news broke to his son that his father had cancer, he requested not to disclose that to his father.…