Philadelphia COVID-19 today: Philadelphia Fitness Coalition protesting gym closures in city amid coronavirus pandemic

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) — More than two dozen gyms in Philadelphia are joining forces, demanding that the city allows them to reopen.

They have created the Philadelphia Fitness Coalition and have gathered more than 1,500 signatures in opposition to the new restrictions.

As the number of covid-19 cases rises, the city required gyms to shut down indoor activities at the end of last week.

But gym owners say it is unfair because of the safety precautions they have put in place.

They plan to protest outside of City Hall on Tuesday.

Last week, the city’s top health official, Dr. Thomas Farley, defended the city’s decision to tighten restrictions, saying now is the riskiest time for the transmission of the virus.

“What was now safe is now dangerous with the change in the weather. Many businesses feel they put safety measures in place, sure they have, and I’m sure there’s no spread there and that’s true in many places. Remember, there are more people than ever with the virus,” said Farley.

City officials said dramatic action is needed to respond to an exponential growth in cases and hospitalizations.

On Thursday, health officials announced 765 additional confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Philadelphia. That brings the number of confirmed cases to 57,237.

The number of residents who have died from the virus in Philadelphia is 1,945.

How is 2nd wave of COVID-19 impacting local hospitals?

As the second wave of COVID-19 hits the Philadelphia region, doctors and medical professionals discuss how the virus is impacting hospitals.

Grey Lodge Pub in Mayfair closing

The new round of COVID-19 regulations was the final straw for one Philadelphia restaurant. The Grey Lodge Pub in Mayfair is closing its doors for good after 70 years in business. The Lucky Cat Brewing Company, which is a standalone business inside the pub, will remain open.

Philadelphia museums knocked back down by new COVID-19 restrictions


The new restrictions put in place to tackle the surge of COVID-19 cases in Philadelphia are hitting museums in the area hard. After going through a five-month shutdown during the first wave, they are being shut down again, which in some cases, will cause hard economic pain and uncertainty for employees.

National Constitution Center temporarily closes to the public through January 1, 2021

In accordance with health guidelines from the City of Philadelphia in response to COVID-19, the National Constitution Center is temporarily closed to the public through January 1, 2021. The Center offers a range of free online programs and resources for learners of all ages. CLICK HERE to learn more.

Houses of worship in Philly vow to persevere amid new COVID restrictions


The new COVID-19 restrictions in Philadelphia will have a major impact on houses of worship, which for the time being can operate at only 5% capacity. While the Archdiocese of Philadelphia revises its guidance, some churches and synagogues in the city have a variety of innovative plans to carry on through the holidays.

Philadelphia-area stores stock up as new COVID restrictions set

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Today In Retail: Fitness Platform Launches

In today’s top news in retail, fitness startup Moxie launches its platform, Amazon earnings are expected on Thursday (Oct. 29) and grocery giant Kroger said its “Restock Kroger” framework will generate shareholder returns of 8 to 11 percent.

Got Moxie? Fitness Startup Enables Trainers To Work From Home

Moxie launched Tuesday (Oct. 27) after spending the summer and fall in beta. Its CEO likes to call it the Airbnb of fitness. More formally, it is a hybrid fitness site for instructors to reach clients, both new and existing. And it’s a site where fitness enthusiasts can find subscriptions for monthly or weekly live classes, all streamed directly on its platform. Subscribers also get access to the video recordings, which can be streamed on Moxie’s site, as well as music clearances, playlists and CRM functionality for the instructors to manage their clients. During the beta phase, Goldberg says there were more than 6,500 classes available, and more than 10,000 individual sessions were live-streamed. The site has also signed up more than 2,000 instructors.

Amazon Earnings Could Produce First $100B Quarter

Amazon reports earnings on Thursday (Oct. 29) and it has an impossible act to follow. With its Q2 earnings reaping every benefit of the pandemic-driven digital-first economy, it set a new standard for exploding past earnings estimates with revenue up 40 percent to $88.9 billion. While it’s a safe bet that Amazon will beat estimates, it won’t come close to the Q2 performance. But as the retail world waits to see what is expected to be a record-setting quarter for Amazon, there are some key indicators to watch. The company has already level set expectations when it said in July that it expects Q3 net sales to come in at between $87 billion and $93 billion, which would be a year-over-year growth rate of between 24 to 33 percent.

Kroger Bullish On Earnings As Supermarket Giant Takes On Digital World

Kroger Co. “has reinvented the company’s business model to deliver consistently strong and attractive total shareholder return,” the company said in a press release on Tuesday (Oct. 27). The Cincinnati-based supermarket giant said its “Restock Kroger” framework will generate shareholder returns of 8 to 11 percent. Restock Kroger is the company’s program to improve shipping, distribution and the links between its online and offline businesses. The company made “several strategic decisions three years ago” to better service its customers, Kroger Chairman and CEO Rodney McMullen said in the release. “We believed customers would continue to move to a seamless shopping platform that combined the best of physical and digital experiences. These choices and investments have positioned Kroger to more effectively respond to the pandemic,” he said.

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NEW PYMNTS DATA: HOW WE SHOP – SEPTEMBER 2020 

The How We Shop Report, a PYMNTS collaboration with PayPal, aims to understand how consumers of all ages and incomes are shifting to shopping and paying online in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. Our research builds

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6 Reasons to Buy the November Issue of Men’s Health Today

Fitness is about far more than your 5K time or the visibility of your abdominal muscles. At Men’s Health, we’ve long strived to present a more thoughtful and multi-faceted view of male health and fitness.

In this issue, you’ll find all the workouts, gear reviews and insider training hacks you’ve come to expect from MH, alongside a more holistic take on health, too. With our 10-page special, Black Minds Matter, we continue our commitment to raising awareness of men’s mental health issues in various sectors of society by looking at the way in which our health services have failed black men.

We also have six feelgood workouts to boost your mental energy and pump up your well-being, plus 31 tips for fortifying your heart against life’s stresses. That, and more besides.

Zack George: Britain’s Fittest Man

Zack George reached the zenith of his sport, only to see his dream dissolve. It has been an intense and busy year for the UK’s finest CrossFitter. This is how he found triumph in adversity to become stronger than ever – and why you need to get with the programming.

Fighting for Black Minds

Black British men are four times more likely than white men to be hospitalised for poor mental health, and are less likely to seek help before they reach crisis point. The system in place to support them is broken. How do we fix it?

The Best Eco Toys in Wellness

Minimising your environmental footprint needn’t mean trading in your Nike Zooms for hemp slippers. Brands at the sharp end of performance are investing time and energy intro crafting sustainable products. Here’s our pick of the best.

Mood-Boosting Workouts

Stressed out? The body part you need to target in your next workout is the one between your ears. With a little neurological know-how, your training sessions can expel anxiety and add muscle to flagging motivation. Get a lift from these.

New Ways to Pump Up Your Heart

Almost 80% of UK adults struggle with work-related stress, while heart diseases account for more than a quarter of British deaths. That means staying young at heart isn’t just a romantic cliche – it’s a doctor’s order. Our experts have their fingers on the pulse.

Your Daily Bread

Blame bowl food for the demise of the humble sandwich. Thankfully, London’s upper crust is making your staple lunch great again – in flavour and nutritious goodness. Make a meal of it.


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How Fetal Cells From The 1970s Power Medical Innovation Today

It is no secret that thousands of laboratories around the world use cells derived from a fetus that was aborted decades ago to develop vital medicines.

But it is a contentious topic in the US, where conservatives and anti-abortion activists have long deemed the practice unethical.

The matter is once more under the spotlight after President Donald Trump was treated for Covid-19 using Regeneron’s antibody treatment. The company used aborted fetal cells as part of its testing process.

“It’s becoming annoying,” Andrea Gambotto, a professor at the University of Pittsburgh, said of the controversy.

Gambotto has used a cell line called HEK 293, the same used by Regeneron, as part of his research for 25 years.

“It’d be a crime to ban the use of these cells,” he added. “It never harmed anybody — it was a dead embryo so the cells back then (were used), instead of being discarded, they were used for research.”

The big advantage of these cells, which were developed in the early 1970s, is that they now represent a “gold standard” in the pharmaceutical industry.

If Gambotto — who is leading a Covid-19 vaccine research project himself — one day succeeds, his vaccine can be produced anywhere in the world, thanks to HEK293.

“You can go to India and make a vaccine for all the world,” he said. To those who call for the development of alternatives, he says, “You don’t need to go back 30 years and reinvent the wheel.”

The original cells were transformed and immortalized in January 1973 by a young Canadian postdoc by the name of Frank Graham, who was working at the time in Leiden, the Netherlands in the laboratory of Professor Alex van der Eb.

Vials of the Oxford University Covid-19 vaccine, which was developed using aborted fetal tissue Vials of the Oxford University Covid-19 vaccine, which was developed using aborted fetal tissue Photo: AFP / Vincenzo PINTO

Normally, a cell has a finite number of divisions, but Graham managed to modify these cells so that they divide ad infinitum.

This was his 293rd experiment, hence the name of the line (HEK stands for “human embryonic kidney cells”).

“Use of fetal tissue was not uncommon in that period,” Graham, a professor emeritus at Canada’s McMaster University who now lives in Italy, told AFP.

“Abortion was illegal in the Netherlands until 1984 except to save the life of the mother. Consequently I have always assumed that the HEK cells used by the Leiden lab must have derived from a therapeutic abortion.”

Vaccine developers like HEK293 because the cells are malleable and transformable into virus mini-factories. To grow viruses, you always need a host cell. It can be a chicken egg, but human cells are preferable in human medicine.

In the case of Covid-19 vaccines, several makers have used HEK293 to generate what are called “viral vectors.”

These are weakened versions of common cold-causing adenoviruses that are loaded with the genetic instructions for human cells to manufacture a surface protein of the coronavirus. This elicits an immune response that the body remembers when it encounters

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Asia Today: South Korea testing at hospitals, nursing homes

South Korea is testing tens of thousands of employees of hospitals and nursing homes to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks at live-in facilities

SEOUL, South Korea — South Korea on Monday began testing tens of thousands of employees of hospitals and nursing homes to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks at live-in facilities.

Fifteen of the 76 latest cases reported by the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency were from the southern port city of Busan, where more than 70 infections have been linked to a hospital for the elderly.

Health workers have been scrambling to track infections in the Seoul metropolitan area, home to about half of the country’s 51 million people, as the virus spreads in a variety of places, including hospitals, churches, schools and workplaces.

From Monday, they will start a process to test 130,000 workers at hospitals, nursing homes and senior centers in the greater capital area. Officials will also test 30,000 patients who have visited and used these facilities, but will leave out hospitalized patients, who already receive tests when they are admitted.

Officials plan to complete the tests within October and could possibly expand the screening to other regions if needed.

South Korea has confirmed 25,275 cases of coronavirus infection, including 444 deaths from COVID-19.

In other developments around the Asia-Pacific region:

— China’s economic growth accelerated to 4.9% over a year earlier in the latest quarter as a shaky recovery from the coronavirus pandemic gathered strength. China, where virus outbreaks began in December, became the first major economy to return to growth with a 3.2% expansion in the quarter ending in June. Output contracted 6.8% in the first quarter. The ruling Communist Party began easing anti-disease controls and reopening factories, shops and offices in March after declaring the virus under control but has kept monitoring and some travel controls in place.

Source Article

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Live: Coronavirus daily news updates, October 17: What to know today about COVID-19 in the Seattle area, Washington state and the world


As healthcare workers throughout the country continue to battle coronavirus, Harborview Medical Center in Seattle confirmed Friday an outbreak in a surgical unit has infected four patients, killing one. Ten Harborview staffers have tested positive for the virus, and 30 more are in quarantine after possible exposure.

Chances remain low, however, that a vaccine for the virus will be approved before Election Day — and on Friday, pharmaceutical corporation Pfizer Inc. announced it cannot request emergency authorization of its vaccine before the third week of November.

Throughout Saturday, on this page, we’ll post updates on the pandemic and its effects on the Seattle area, the Pacific Northwest and the world. Updates from Friday are here, and all our coronavirus coverage can be found here.

(Jennifer Luxton / The Seattle Times)

The coronavirus pandemic sidelined many Seattle-area food trucks. Here’s how the survivors made it

Lorelei Johnston, manager of the BeanFish food truck, pushes a cart toward the kitchen where she picks up supplies for the day ahead. The food truck stays overnight at Chop Kitchens in White Center, the commissary where food trucks park and where owners and their employees do kitchen prep. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)
Lorelei Johnston, manager of the BeanFish food truck, pushes a cart toward the kitchen where she picks up supplies for the day ahead. The food truck stays overnight at Chop Kitchens in White Center, the commissary where food trucks park and where owners and their employees do kitchen prep. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)

If you’ve ever wondered what happens to a food truck in a global pandemic, swing by Chop Kitchens in White Center. 

Before COVID-19, the commercial commissary was a bustling mother ship for nine food trucks. The vendors prepped their meals in the big commercial kitchen, raced out to crowded spots like South Lake Union or a farmers market or a festival and returned a few hours later — often just as others were leaving for evening shifts. “It was just nonstop,” recalls Avery Hardin, who launched his Layers Sandwich Co. truck with his wife Ashley at Chop Kitchens last fall. 

All that changed when COVID-19 came to town this spring. Office parks became ghost towns. Festivals canceled and diners hunkered down at home. The food truck bubble collapsed like a mishandled soufflé. 

Today, just four of Chop Kitchens’ 10 current tenants take their trucks out with any regularity, say owners Vatsana Nouanthongme, 53, and Montanee Suthanasereporn, 44, two former truck vendors who opened the commissary in 2017 in an old Dairy Queen. Most of the rest of the big trucks, each of which can represent investments of $75,000 or more, now sit in the commissary’s big, fenced lot waiting for better times.

Chop Kitchens is probably a microcosm of the larger food truck business.

In King County, the official tally of “health-permitted food trucks,” which includes both trucks and trailers, fell from 460 in January 2020 to 327 as of September, according to the Washington State Food Truck Association. 

It isn’t clear how much of that decline is pandemic-related — but it’s also unclear how many of those 327 are actually operating. Anecdotally, vendors say, many trucks are either temporarily parked or working just a few days a month. 

Read the full story here.

—Paul Roberts

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