The best fitness trackers for kids, tried and tested

Getting your child a fitness tracker is a fun way to encourage keeping active. Children aged 5 to 18 should be getting at least one hour of exercise every day but many don’t, not least because watching TV and playing video games is often more appealing.

If your child is interested in tech and often wants to ‘have a go’ with your fitness tracker, you might consider buying them a gadget of their own.

Like the adult versions, kids’ fitness trackers monitor movement, recording your child’s daily step count and nudging them when they’ve been sitting still for too long. They offer the option to compete against friends in sporty challenges and win digital badges for reaching goals. Many also track sleep quality.

Smaller sizing aside, the key difference is that most children’s fitness trackers don’t track calories, so you won’t need to worry about them developing an unhealthy relationship with food and exercise. They also won’t reveal the location of the wearer.

The data can be synced to a smartphone belonging to either the child or their parent, so that they can see how active they have been that day and monitor their progress.

How we test

We asked three children aged six, seven and eight, to wear each fitness tracker for a week at a time. The testers and their parents were asked to comment on comfort, simplicity of use, accuracy, battery life and any extra features.

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Slovakia tested most of the country in two days. Here’s how they did it and what they found

The European country decided to embark on the gargantuan quest to test everyone over the age of 10 after Covid-19 cases started spiking last month. Dubbed operation “Joint responsibility,” the program was the first attempt at large-scale blanket testing in Europe.

Just over 1% of those taking part tested positive, about 38,359 people in total, according to the official website of the program.

The program was first piloted on October 23 in Orava and Bardejov, two regions with the highest number of Covid-19 cases in the country. Nearly 141,000 people, 91% of those who were eligible, got tested in the two regions over the three days of the pilot.

In the rest of the country, the testing took place simultaneously on Saturday and Sunday. The government encouraged everyone older than 10 to take part in the voluntary program. People older than 65 years who spend most of their time at home, people with disabilities, cancer patients, immunocompromised people and other vulnerable groups were exempt.

Mike Tildesley, an infectious disease modeling expert at the University Warwick and a UK government scientific adviser, said that effective mass testing could be used in the long term as an alternative to lockdown to control the spread of disease.

“However, it is important to realize that just because someone tests negative it does not mean that they will necessarily be free from infection a few days later,” he said. “So any mass testing strategy needs to be carried out at regular intervals (every few days) in order to be an effective strategy and to allow some lockdown measures to be relaxed.”

The government said it was considering running a second round of the mass testing later this month, but no decision has been made yet.

The Slovak program used rapid antigen tests which provide results in minutes. Unlike the molecular diagnostic (PCR) tests, antigen tests don’t have to be processed in a lab, so they are faster and cheaper. But they can also be less reliable. While the PCR tests look for the virus’ genetic material, the antigen test looks for pieces of protein from the virus.

The Slovak military has been in charge of the testing campaign which required the deployment of 40,463 staff, including 14,500 health workers and 6,319 soldiers, to nearly 5,000 testing locations across the country.

The testing was voluntary, but those who decided to skip it will have to continue comply with stricter coronavirus restrictions and will not be allowed to leave their homes unless they are carrying out one of a few narrowly-defined exempt activities until Sunday.
The number of older people getting coronavirus in Europe is rising again. That's really bad news

Those who tested negative no longer have to comply with the strictest restrictions as long as they can prove their negative status with an official certificate. People who tested positive now have to quarantine — either at home, or in one of dozens of designated hotels across the country.

Slovakia’s Prime Minister Igor Matovic on Sunday praised those who were involved in the program. “Village and city mayors, civil servants, village or

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Prince William ‘Tested Positive for COVID-19 in April’



The Duke of Cambridge contracted COVID-19 earlier this year but did not reveal the diagnosis to avoid alarming the nation, it was reported.

It is understood that Prince William tested positive in April, shortly after his father, the Prince of Wales.

According to The Sun , which first reported the story, Prince William was treated by palace doctors, and self-isolated at the family home, Anmer Hall, in Norfolk.

‘Struggling to Breathe’

The newspaper quoted a source who said: “William was hit pretty hard by the virus – it really knocked him for six.

“At one stage he was struggling to breathe, so obviously everyone around him was pretty panicked.”

In late March, Prince Charles tested positive for COVID-19 and self-isolated for 7 days at Balmoral Castle in Scotland with his wife, Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, who tested negative.

The 71-year-old heir to the throne was said to have experienced mild symptoms.

On 27 March, Boris Johnson revealed he had tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

The Prime Minister was admitted to hospital on 5 April. He was subsequently moved to intensive care and later thanked healthcare workers for saving his life.

The UK experienced its worst day for deaths from COVID-19 just days later, on 8 April, when a record 1445 people died with the disease in a 24-hour period.

News reports have not identified which date in April Prince William tested positive for COVID-19.

The Prince has not publicly confirmed that he had the SARS-CoV-2 virus. However, according to The Sun, he reportedly commented privately at an engagement, “There were important things going on and I didn’t want to worry anyone.”

Kensington Palace declined to comment on Sunday over the media reports but did not deny the claims, Sky News reported.

Prince Carried Out Public Engagements

Despite his illness, Prince William carried out a series of telephone and video engagements in April.

These included:

  • 1 April: Telephone calls with staff at Queen’s Hospital, Burton-on-Trent, and staff at University Hospital Monklands in Airdrie

  • 16 April: Opening the NHS Nightingale Hospital in Birmingham via video link

  • 22 April: A roundtable meeting to discuss emergency responder mental health and wellbeing via video link

  • 27 April: A telephone call with Victoria Hornby, chief executive officer of Mental Health Innovations

Lockdown Measures

The reports of Prince William’s diagnosis emerged days before England is due to enter a second national lockdown, with 4 weeks of restrictive measures designed to stem a growing number of cases of COVID-19.

Mr Johnson announced at a Downing Street news conference on Saturday that pubs, restaurants, gyms, non-essential shops, and places of worship must close.

He said nobody wanted to impose such measures, but no Prime Minister could ignore the expert evidence of a “national problem”, with deaths and hospital admissions continuing to double.

The Prime Minister is due to make a statement to the Commons on Monday afternoon.

MPs are due to vote on the measures on Wednesday.

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WHO chief self-quarantining after contact with person who tested positive for coronavirus

The World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus announced late Sunday he was self-quarantining after coming into contact with someone who tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

“I have been identified as a contact of someone who has tested positive for #COVID19,” Tedros wrote on Twitter. “I am well and without symptoms but will self-quarantine over the coming days, in line with @WHO protocols, and work from home.”

The announcement comes as the coronavirus has totaled at least 46,426,677 worldwide cases and more than 1,199,684 deaths, as of Sunday night, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. 

4 CORONAVIRUS TREATMENTS, INCLUDING REMDESIVIR, HYDROXYCHLOROQUINE, FLOP IN LARGE WHO STUDY

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO), addresses a press conference about the update on COVID-19 at the World Health Organization headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland on Feb. 24, 2020. (Salvatore Di Nolfi/Keystone via AP, File)

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO), addresses a press conference about the update on COVID-19 at the World Health Organization headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland on Feb. 24, 2020. (Salvatore Di Nolfi/Keystone via AP, File)

Tedros is currently in Geneva, which is home to WHO headquarters, according to his Twitter bio. On Sunday, the city announced a partial lockdown, following an outbreak of cases and hospitalizations due to the virus.

“On November 1, 474 people are being treated by the University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG), including 56 in intensive care beds (intensive and intermediate care). As a reminder, in mid-October, the HUG had 78 hospitalizations, including 13 in intensive care beds,” a statement by the cantonal government said.

“The figures show that the situation is severely worsening. Over the past few days, more than 1,000 people have tested positive for coronavirus on a daily basis,” the statement continued.

According to WHO guidelines cited by Tedros, the agency “recommends that all contacts of individuals with a confirmed or probable COVID-19 be quarantined in a designated facility or at home for 14 days from their last exposure.”

HEALTHY YOUNG PEOPLE MAY WAIT FOR CORONAVIRUS VACCINE UNTIL 2022, WHO OFFICIAL SAYS

On Sunday, he wrote that it was “critically important that we all comply with health guidance.”

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“This is how we will break chains of #COVID19 transmission, suppress the virus, and protect health systems,” Tedros added. “My @WHO colleagues and I will continue to engage with partners in solidarity to save lives and protect the vulnerable. Together!”

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2 people who attended Trump’s rally in North Carolina have tested positive for coronavirus

The Gaston County Health & Human Services Department said in a statement Thursday that there have been two positive Covid-19 cases “involving individuals attending the recent campaign rally in Gastonia.”

The department stressed that the cases are “not thought to be an indication of spread from the rally at this time, but rather two independent cases among individuals who were in attendance.” The event took place at Gaston Municipal Airport on October 21.

Trump rallied last Wednesday in the Charlotte suburb, where he told attendees the pandemic was “rounding the corner.” Trump was due to return on Thursday but postponed that rally citing “gusts reaching 50 miles per hour and other weather conditions,” according to an email sent by his campaign.

Health officials said that due to the number in attendance last week they are unable to properly contact trace those who may have been exposed.

“Because of the large number of potential contacts from the rally, and the inability to alert them directly, the community is being notified so they can assess their own risk and take appropriate actions,” the health department statement said. “Anyone who was in attendance at the rally is encouraged to monitor their symptoms and seek testing if needed.”

One of the people who tested positive, a reporter who covered the rally for a local TV station, confirmed his positive test on Twitter.

“Full disclosure: I’m one of the two people who tested positive after covering Pres. Trump’s Gastonia rally. Thankfully, I feel okay though I’m quarantining per county guidelines,” Brandon Goldner, a reporter with WCNC Charlotte, wrote on Twitter.

Goldner said that he has contacted everyone who he “interviewed or interacted with” before the positive test result, and that he was wearing a mask at the entire rally, but “Secret Service protocols” occasionally made social distancing not possible.

WCNC Charlotte confirmed the positive test in a statement on its website.

CNN reached out to the Secret Service for comment.

When reached by CNN, the Trump campaign pointed to the county health department’s statement.

Cases on the rise

North Carolina is seeing high case counts and hospitalizations from Covid-19 as the virus continues spreading throughout the state, Gov. Roy Cooper, a Democrat, said Wednesday.

The state has seen nearly 270,000 cases of Covid-19 resulting in 4,283 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University’s tally of cases in the United States.

Cooper said the state continues to monitor hospitalizations, adding, “We have plenty of hospital capacity, plenty of ICU capacity, plenty of labor capacity, but you are concerned when you see it creep up, and (Dr. Mandy Cohen, secretary of the state health department) continues to be concerned about some smaller hospitals that are already feeling a little bit of the pinch here.”

Contact tracers are finding that many Covid-19 cases come from smaller gatherings of extended family and friends, youth group outings, family meals or church, Cooper said.

“We too often let our guard down when we are with people we know and trust. But

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Antibody drug tested in Cook County may be helpful to some COVID-19 patients, results show

A new antibody-based drug shows promise in treating outpatients who have mild to severe COVID-19, according to initial results of research conducted in part at Cook County Health and Northwestern University.

Patients given the drug were hospitalized or visited the emergency room less often than those given a placebo, Cook County Health officials said. The patients receiving the drug also showed improvement within two to six days, a shorter disease course that is not only good for patients but also may reduce the amount of time a person is infectious, helping protect other people.

The drug, manufactured by Eli Lilly and AbCellera Biologics Inc., was tested on 452 outpatients at 24 medical institutions across the country, including Cook County’s vast public health system and the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. Most of the 14 patients who took part at Cook County Health were Latino or Black, populations that have been hit especially hard by the disease.

The results of the continuing study, which is being run by Eli Lilly, were published Wednesday by the New England Journal of Medicine.

The drug, administered through a one-time infusion, includes the replicated antibodies of one of the first patients in the United States to survive COVID-19. It’s classified as a monoclonal antibody treatment, the same type of medication given to President Donald Trump after he was diagnosed with the disease and which he described as “a cure.”

The drug in the Eli Lilly trial was formulated using a single antibody. The drug Trump received was made by Regeneron and involves two antibodies.

Dr. Gregory Huhn, an infectious disease expert who led the arm of the Eli Lilly research conducted at Cook County Health, made it clear that the drug is a treatment, not a cure.

“Our hope has been that the antibody drug will reduce COVID symptoms quickly after diagnosis and help to eradicate the virus more quickly,” Huhn said. “While a vaccine is still necessary, this drug therapy has the potential to prevent bad clinical outcomes and complications of COVID-19.”

Scientists have surmised that monoclonal antibodies would be more effective earlier in the course of the disease, and that so far appears to be the case. Another recently released study found the Eli Lilly drug had no benefit for patients sick enough to be hospitalized — results that brought the research to a halt. Most of those patients also were treated with the antiviral drug remdesivir.

“There’s a more compelling argument to administer antibodies early on, before our own bodies generate their own immune response,” Huhn said.

The results released Wednesday found that 1.6% of outpatients given the Eli Lilly drug needed to be hospitalized or visit an emergency room, compared with 6.3% of patients who received a placebo. The drug worked by reducing the amount of virus in people’s bodies, the study determined.

The study’s findings also indicate better outcomes among high-risk patients — defined as patients 65 or older or morbidly obese patients who were at least

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Nearly half a million Americans tested positive for Covid-19 In just the last week

Nearly half a million Americans tested positive for Covid-19 in just the last week as a fall surge of the contagious virus claws its way into every region of the country.



a boy wearing a hat: Nyasia Camara, medical assistant, checks in a person for a COVID-19 test at the drive-thru testing site at Mercy Health Anderson Hospital, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020. You must have an ID. They're open from 8am - 1pm and do about 70 tests each day. Over 5,000 deaths in Ohio have been reported during the pandemic, according to Ohio Department of Health.  Testing Political Signs Scenes For Wwlt


© Liz Dufour/The Enquirer/Imagn/USA Today
Nyasia Camara, medical assistant, checks in a person for a COVID-19 test at the drive-thru testing site at Mercy Health Anderson Hospital, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020. You must have an ID. They’re open from 8am – 1pm and do about 70 tests each day. Over 5,000 deaths in Ohio have been reported during the pandemic, according to Ohio Department of Health. Testing Political Signs Scenes For Wwlt

The past seven days have been marked by daunting coronavirus records and upticks, with 489,769 new cases reported since October 20. In the US, more than 8.7 million people have now been infected since the pandemic again, according to Johns Hopkins University.

The fall resurgence has led some local and state officials to rein in their reopening plans, as hospitalization numbers increase and states report case records. Still, public fatigue and political unwillingness to require masks and restrict gatherings — exemplified by the White House chief of staff’s frank admission that “we are not going to control the pandemic” — suggest worse days to come.

Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration, said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Monday that the US was at a tipping point where aggressive action could stem the worst of the pandemic.

“But we’re not going to do that and I understand why. There’s a lot of fatigue set in and a lot of policy resistance to taking strong action ahead of, you know, the spread,” he said.

“I think we’re right now at the cusp of what’s going to be exponential spread in parts of the country.”

At 69,967 new cases per day, the 7-day average of new cases is at the highest levels since the pandemic began, bringing the national death toll to 225,720, according to data from Johns Hopkins.

And state numbers are worrisome too: 37 states are reporting at least 10% more new cases in the past week compared to the previous week, and 21 states saw their highest 7-day averages on Sunday.

In all, 29 states have reported at least one record high day of new cases during the month of October, according to Johns Hopkins University data.

The increase in cases is not because of more testing but because of more infections, said Admiral Brett Giroir, the White House coronavirus task force testing czar, a position contrary to President Trump’s comments.

“Testing may be identifying some more cases, I think that’s clearly true, but what we’re seeing is a real increase in the numbers,” Giroir said Tuesday during a Washington Post live event.

Public health measures like mask wearing, avoiding crowds, physical distancing and hand hygiene make a difference, as they did in Arizona, Florida, Texas and across the Deep South, he said.

Some officials reinstate restrictions

Officials from New

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Parents in so-called ‘mom code’ allegedly refuse to get kids tested for COVID-19 to help keep schools open

The so-called “mom code” is allegedly being shared by some parents in Utah.

Health officials are sounding the alarm about a group of parents in Utah who are allegedly pledging to not have their children tested for COVID-19 in order to make infection numbers artificially appear lower.

The alleged push to avoid getting kids tested, dubbed the “mom code,” is seen in messages shared on Facebook urging parents to keep their child at home if they show COVID-19 symptoms, but to not get tested.

The messages are reportedly being shared among parents in Utah’s Davis School District, which oversees more than 73,000 students in Davis County, Utah.

“If there is a quarantine with a sports team or with any of the classrooms, they are encouraging each other not to have their children tested,” said Genevra Prothero, a parent in the school district, who fears community spread if the “mom code” is encouraged. “This is a time where we need to really focus on tracing the virus so we can be able to stop the spread.”

State health officials say it’s unknown how many parents are actually taking part in the alleged “mom code,” but warn that those who do could be contributing to the spread of COVID-19.

PHOTO: Facebook screenshots allegedly show parents discouraging testing for COVID-19.

Facebook screenshots allegedly show parents discouraging testing for COVID-19.

“Testing is a critical element of our response,” health officials told “Good Morning America” in a statement, in part. “Identifying cases …is a key strategy to limiting the spread of disease in our communities.”

Davis County currently has more than 8,000 reported cases of COVID-19. The state of Utah has more than 104,000 cases of COVID-19, according to state health data.

The United States is the worst-affected country, with more than 8.6 million diagnosed cases of COVID-19 and at least 225,230 deaths.

Emilie Daly, a mother of four young children, is running for the school board in Davis County. She told “GMA” that while she is not participating in the reported “mom code,” she can understand why some parents would.

“It’s not mandated to get tested, that’s the thing,” she said. “And so we need to remember that it is a choice and you need to make decisions based off of what you feel.”

The Davis School District did not reply to ABC News’ request for comment. ABC News also reached out to some of the parents allegedly involved in the so-called “mom code” and they also did not reply.

Students in the district are currently attending school on a varied, hybrid model of in-person and remote learning, according to the school district’s website.

The school district’s Board of Education last week released its quarantine protocols for students and staff, noting that in the case of a school outbreak, the classroom or school would enter a “14-day quarantine with students moving to remote learning.”

“The longer

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Fitness gear tested Covid-19 positive in Thailand hotel for quarantine

BANGKOK, Oct 25 (Xinhua): Thai health authorities on Sunday said Covid-19 virus was found on the surface of fitness equipment in a hotel gym where an infected patient was quarantined.

“However, rest assured, health officials had conducted swab tests on 67 people in the hotel and all were cleared of infection,” said Dr. Opas Karnkawinpong, Director-General of the Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health.

Seven specimens from the environment in the hotel in Bangkok’s adjacent province of Samut Prakan were examined and the virus was found in one of them, he added.

There was a risk of quarantined people spreading the virus in a gym or in other areas of the hotel, he said.

Due to this incident, the ministry’s Disease Control Department and the Department of Health Service Support have decided to tighten up preventive measures at hotels used as quarantine facilities.

Regarding the infected case, a French woman, Opas said that the latest blood test showed no sign of antibodies, while her husband, son and a friend who picked her up at Samui airport have been cleared of the virus.

All 10 passengers on the same flight with the woman from Bangkok to Koh Samui, and two cabin crew, have been tested with negative results and all have been isolated for observation.

The 57-year-old woman entered quarantine at a hotel in Bangkok on Sept 30 after her arrival from France.

She underwent two tests during the 14-day mandatory quarantine period, which both returned negative results.

Two days later she fell ill, with a fever, cough and muscle pain, and was admitted to a private hospital on the island. Two subsequent tests confirmed she was infected.

Thailand on Sunday reported four new coronavirus cases, including the women and three others identified whilst in state quarantine, taking the total number of infections to 3,736.- Xinhua

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UCSF study in Bay Area neighborhood reveals 10% of those tested have COVID-19 antibody

UC San Francisco released a preliminary analysis Thursday of data from a coronavirus testing effort in Oakland’s Fruitvale neighborhood and it confirmed what other similar studies have found: The novel coronavirus disproportionately affects the Latino community.

UCSF, in conjunction with local community groups, offered free, voluntary COVID-19 testing Sept. 26 and 27 in Fruitvale, a corner of Alameda County that has had the highest rates of COVID. Fruitvale is 50% Latino and home to one of the largest Mayan-speaking populations outside of Mexico, according to UCSF. Many residents live in multigenerational households.

Nearly 2,000 people were tested for either active infection or antibodies.


A total of 1,099 people were tested for active infection with nose swabs, and of those, 4% tested positive (29 adults and 10 children).

Of those with coronavirus, 95% were Latino, though they represented 62% of individuals tested, according to UCSF.

Of the 859 individuals (803 adults and 56 children) who were tested for the COVID-19 antibody, 10% were positive, suggesting past infection. Latino individuals had a positivity rate of 12% and those of Mayan heritage 27%.

At a Friday morning press conference, Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf called the study results “disturbing but not unexpected data” revealing the health disparities in the city. “And let’s be honest, in the world,” she added.

“Our data further identifies the Mam speaking, Mayan population as particularly high risk within the Latino community,” Dr. Alicia Fernandez, a professor of medicine and director of the UCSF Latinx Center of Excellence, said in a statement. “More testing and targeted public health messaging are needed, as are efforts to make essential work safer.”

Researchers also gathered data to examine the overall impact of the pandemic and found 25% of Latinos who received a nose swab test have seen a reduction in income, 15% have lost their jobs and 42% face food insecurity. Sixty-one percent of Mam (Mayan) speakers said they were food insecure.
 
“It is not new that we are the underserved and one of the most vulnerable groups in the area, and now with COVID-19 we are facing an even greater crisis especially with access to health services, housing, food and financial support. That is why we are here today, we are here to ask for more testing and assistance with essential needs,” Rosendo Aguilar, Fruitvale community member and Mam speaker, said in a statement.

UCSF study conducted a similar effort in San Francisco’s Mission District in April and found 95% of positive individuals were of Latino heritage.

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