Juice WRLD’s Mother Speaks on Son’s Death and Addiction for the First Time

Juice WRLD’s life ended way too soon due to his addiction and need to self-medicate. Although his artistry left—and continues to leave—a lasting impact on the world, the rapper’s mother wants to be open about her son’s struggle. 

Juice WRLD’s mother, Carmela Wallace, sat down with Chicago’s ABC affiliate to talk about her son for the first time since his death. During the conversation, Wallace explains that her son’s passing can serve as an example for others as long as she is open about its cause.

“It was devastating,” Wallace said. “But, one thing I decided early on was that I was not going to hide the fact that he died from a drug overdose. I did not want to keep that a secret because there are a lot of people who deal with that every day.”

Wallace went on to say that she and Juice WRLD talked about everything—including his addiction. This led to a conversation about self-medication and putting his mental health in perspective.

“I said, ‘if you have anxiety, then you need to get medicated properly for it instead of medicating yourself,'” she recalled. “I talked to him about it. I told him my biggest fear was him overdosing on the stuff. That’s why I made the decision I have to talk about it with other people. I can’t keep that as a secret.”

To address this issue, Wallace is furthering Juice WRLD’s brand by starting the Live Free 999 Foundation. This organization will help young people dealing with mental health issues and drug addiction. Wallace explains that a lot of Juice WRLD’s fans and friends have reached out to her following his death to disclose their own mental health issue, moving her to start the foundation.

“That’s our objective with our foundation. Normalize the conversation, so it has to start with me,” she continued. “I hope it’s what he wanted, was a legacy of healing. To let people know that you don’t have to suffer alone.”

Although the focus is mental health relief, the Live Free 999 Foundation will also do its part to uplift the community in various ways. It has recently donated new musical instruments to Juice WRLD’s former high school in Chicago Heights. 

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Christopher Cross speaks out on near-fatal COVID-19 battle

Christopher Cross is on the mend.

The singer, 69, who is known for hits like “Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do)” and “Sailing,” told CBS Sunday Morning that while he’s doing fine these days, his bout with COVID-19 earlier this year nearly killed him.

“There was some, you know, come-to-Jesus moments or whatever, where I was looking for any help I could get, you know, through this, to get outta this thing,” Cross told correspondent Serena Altschul. “‘Cause I wasn’t sure.”

When asked by Altschul when he thinks he was exposed, Cross said he assumes it was on a trip to Mexico.

“It was early March that I went to Mexico City for a concert,” he recalled. “And, to be frank, you know, nobody knew about masks or anything like that. No one wore masks on the plane. No one was doing that. We weren’t made aware that it was a problem.”

Along with his girlfriend Joy, Cross got very sick, and was left laid up at home for several weeks.

“We both got very sick with COVID,” he said. “We were sick for about three weeks. The biggest thing I remember is just incredible malaise — just, you couldn’t lift your head.”

Cross revealed his diagnosis on April 3 in a lengthy Facebook post, and advised those who weren’t taking the virus seriously to do so from now on.

“For those of you who still do not believe the COVID-19 virus is real, or think it is a ‘hoax’ or part of some conspiracy,” he wrote at the time, “my advice to you is to understand right now that this is a deadly illness spreading like wildfire throughout the world.”

Christopher Cross (pictured in 1986) says he struggled to play guitar after experiencing paralysis as he battled COVID-19. (Photo: Fryderyk Gabowicz/picture alliance via Getty Images)
Christopher Cross (pictured in 1986) says he struggled to play guitar after experiencing paralysis as he battled COVID-19. (Photo: Fryderyk Gabowicz/picture alliance via Getty Images)

While Cross soon felt he was on the mend, the virus proved to take more out of him than he realized.

“I went to the market. Then when I got home, I just, my legs just gave out,” said Cross. “That was it. Couldn’t walk at all.”

He was soon diagnosed with Guillain-Barré Syndrome, an illness where the body’s immune system attacks the nerves. Cross says his doctor believes the disease was caused by COVID-19. As his body struggled with the virus, he found himself hospitalized and unable to walk.

“You know, just, boom, I’m paralyzed. I’m in the hospital, but I can’t turn over. I can barely do anything,” said Cross. “My hands were also paralytic, which is hard, ’cause I play the guitar, of course. I wasn’t sure whether I would get that back.”

Cross calls his period of hospitalization “the worst 10 days of my life.”

“I couldn’t walk, could barely move. And so, it was certainly the darkest of times for me, you know?” he said. “It was really touch-and-go, and tough.”

When asked by Altschul what he was saying to himself during those horrifying moments in

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