Dentist held for south Delhi hit-and-run case – cities

New Delhi:

Police on Tuesday said they have arrested a 42-year-old dentist for allegedly running over a 38-year-old woman when she was crossing the road in south Delhi’s Lado Sarai last month.

The dentist allegedly fled the mishap spot after hitting the woman who worked at a private bank. The Honda City car he was driving has been recovered, police said.

Deputy commissioner of police (south) Atul Kumar Thakur said that around 8.30 pm on November 17, the police control room received a call about an accident at the Lado Sarai traffic signal.

A police team reached the spot and found that the injured woman had been shifted to the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS).

The team reached the hospital and learnt that the woman was declared brought dead. She was identified as Archana Kushwaha, a native of Allahabad in Uttar Pradesh.

Kushwaha worked as a customer associate at a private bank in Gurugram, Haryana, and lived at a paying guest (PG) accommodation in Lado Sarai.

“It was a case of hit-and-run and the suspect fled along with his vehicle. A case of rash and negligent driving causing death was registered and teams were formed to investigate the case,” said a police officer.

Kushwaha’s family members used social media to disseminate information about her death and to seek help from people in getting justice for her.

“I posted details about my sister’s death in the road accident case. The police assured they will find the culprit. On Tuesday, they informed me about his arrest and seizure of the Honda City car that hit my sister,” said Pankaj Kushwah, brother of the woman.

DCP Thakur said CCTV cameras on the route were scanned and police zeroed in on a Honda City car and apprehended its driver, who was identified as Pankaj Sudhakar (42), a resident of Kalkaji Extension in Delhi.

Sudhakar runs a dentist clinic in Saket, Thakur said.“He was speeding at the time of the accident,” Thakur said.

Kushwaha is survived by her parents and four siblings, including two sisters.

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Sun Sentinel extends deadline to nominate South Florida’s Top Workplaces

The South Florida Sun Sentinel is inviting the public to nominate the best employers in South Florida as Top Workplaces — and there’s still plenty of time to apply.

The deadline for final nominations has been extended from Oct. 30 to Dec. 11.

It is the seventh consecutive year that the news organization has recognized companies and nonprofit organizations in Broward, Palm Beach and Miami-Dade counties for their efforts to boost employee engagement, attract and retain top talent, and transform the workplace culture.

Any organization with 35 or more employees in Palm Beach, Broward or Miami-Dade is eligible to participate. That includes public, private, nonprofit and government entities.

Energage, the research partner for the project, evaluates workplaces using a 24-question survey filled out by employees. So far, more than 115 South Florida companies have signed up to take the Top Workplaces survey.

The results of the contest will be published in May.

For information and to enter nominations, participants may visit http://www.sunsentinel.com/nominate or call (954) 666-0786.

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©2020 the Sun Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.)

Visit the Sun Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.) at www.sun-sentinel.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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South Dakota sees record virus hospitalizations, cases

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Hospitalizations from COVID-19 in South Dakota reached new heights for the fourth straight day on Wednesday.

The number of daily new cases also set a record, with 1,270 people testing positive for the virus. The virus has surged in the state and region, sending South Dakota to the nation’s second-worst ranking in new cases per capita over the last two weeks. Johns Hopkins researchers report that one out of roughly every 77 people in the state has tested positive in the last two weeks.

The wave of cases has resulted in 412 people who are currently hospitalized with the virus. Health officials also reported nine new deaths. October has become the state’s deadliest month of the pandemic, with 189 deaths so far.


The outbreak has been particularly severe in the state’s prisons, where one out of roughly every three people incarcerated statewide has an active coronavirus infection.

Gov. Kristi Noem has made it clear she will not issue any requirements to wear masks in public. She has cast her approach to the pandemic — foregoing government restrictions to keep economic activity humming — as an example of Republican leadership. She spent the day at several Trump campaign events in Maine and New Hampshire.

Meanwhile, South Dakota health officials attempted to offer some hope to the state’s virus outlook, saying they will be ready by the middle of next month to distribute coronavirus vaccinations. But it is not clear when coronavirus vaccinations will receive regulatory approval and actually arrive in the state.

Health experts are hoping that several candidates for vaccines could be ready for distribution by year’s end, maybe sooner. President Donald Trump has pushed for a faster timeline.

South Dakota Secretary of Health Kim Malsam-Rysdon said she is following federal instructions to have a vaccine distribution system in place by Nov. 15.

“If the vaccine shows up at our doorstep on that day, it will be getting out to folks immediately,” she said.

South Dakota’s plan prioritizes health care workers and people who are vulnerable to the virus before vaccines are made widely available to the public.

The Food and Drug Administration has pledged that any vaccine it approves will meet clear standards for its safety and effectiveness.

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Central Ohio nonprofit’s ‘Farmacy in the City’ program in South Linden to combine diet, medicine

Editor’s note: This story has been updated to correct the number of patients served by the Charitable Pharmacy and which government agency gave it $1.5 million to renovate the building where it is opening a second location.



a sign on the side of the road: Site of the former Eagle Supermarket, 1464 Cleveland Ave., on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020 in Columbus, Ohio. The Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio and Community Development for All People will open a pharmacy and fresh-food market at the site of the former South Linden carryout, which the city shut down in 2016. The "Farmacy in the City" will open in Spring 2021.


© Joshua A. Bickel/Columbus Dispatch
Site of the former Eagle Supermarket, 1464 Cleveland Ave., on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020 in Columbus, Ohio. The Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio and Community Development for All People will open a pharmacy and fresh-food market at the site of the former South Linden carryout, which the city shut down in 2016. The “Farmacy in the City” will open in Spring 2021.

The Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio will open a second location addressing low-income Franklin County residents’ food and pharmaceutical needs with its “Farmacy in the City” program. 

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The nonprofit’s new site, co-located with Community Development for All People, will feature a pharmacy and fresh food market under one roof. Here, vulnerable Franklin County residents can receive non-narcotic prescription medicine, pharmacy services and healthy food at no cost. 

“Our patients may not have access to healthy food and other resources that you need to stay in those healthy habits to reduce your disease burden,” Charitable Pharmacy executive director Jennifer Seifert said. “We’re really excited now that when someone says, ‘I don’t know what to eat,’ we can bring some resources around them.”

Since 2010, CPCO has contributed $50 million in pharmacy services and prescription medicine, today serving over 7,000 Franklin County residents living at or below 200% of the federal poverty level.

More: Charitable Pharmacy sees more patients, more costs due to COVID-19

CPCO’s model is different from that of free clinics. Pharmacists spend time with patients to understand their medical history, explain the impact of their prescribed medicine and create an action plan for the future, development director Melanie Boyd said.

Despite this decade of positive impact, it’s clear that sometimes medicine isn’t the most pressing need when patients walk through the pharmacy’s doors. Basic needs such as food, shelter and clothing often take precedence. 

After receiving a grant of nearly $100,000 from the Franklin County Board of Commissioners in 2019, CPCO began exploring communities where its support could have the most impact and identified South Linden as a place where it could help the neighborhood achieve better health outcomes.



A rendering of the completed renovations for the Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio's fresh market. Slated to open spring 2021, the "farmacy" will be located at 1464 Cleveland Ave. in South Linden in a former Eagle Market.


© Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio
A rendering of the completed renovations for the Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio’s fresh market. Slated to open spring 2021, the “farmacy” will be located at 1464 Cleveland Ave. in South Linden in a former Eagle Market.

The unfortunate truth is that one’s ZIP code often determines the quality of their health care.

“You go to the suburbs and look at how many pharmacies you have per capita — it’s a real different story in some other sections of the city,” Boyd said. “We know that coming in (to South Linden) as a charitable pharmacy to work with the existing pharmacies, we’re going to be able to meet

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Almost half of South Dakota’s prison population tests positive for COVID-19

ABC News Corona Virus Government. Response

The notion that prisons can be sealed from the outside is “magical thinking.”

Nearly half of South Dakota’s 3,347-person prison population has tested positive for COVID-19, according to the most recent data released by the state’s department of corrections Tuesday.

“Unfortunately, the result was predictable,” said Leo Beletsky, a professor of law and health sciences at Northeastern University. “In many states, the top hotspots for COVID spread have been prisons and jails.”

PHOTO: A guard checks on inmates at the Jameson Annex of the South Dakota State Penitentiary in Sioux Falls, S.D., Nov. 13, 2013. A coronavirus outbreak has infected a notable percentage of the inmate population.

A guard checks on inmates at the Jameson Annex of the South Dakota State Penitentiary in Sioux Falls, S.D., Nov. 13, 2013. A coronavirus outbreak has infected a notable percentage of the inmate population.

South Dakota’s concerning rate of COVID-19 in prisons is part of a larger narrative. Like so many aspects of the pandemic, the virus has shined a light on vulnerable communities and weak spots in the health care system. Prisons and jails, many of which are chronically overcrowded dormitory settings with shared toilets and showers, and where basic hygiene is hard to uphold, are primed for infectious disease outbreaks.

“People don’t even have access to soap,” Beletsky added.

Then there’s the population itself. Incarcerated people have higher rates of underlying conditions than the general population, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which puts them at risk for severe complications and death if they contract the virus.

“The reality is that people are living on top of each other and breathing infected air,” said Kate Chatfield, senior adviser for legislation and policy at The Justice Collaborative, a criminal justice research and advocacy organization.

In conjunction with the state health department, the corrections department is doing mass testing in all facilities, according to Mike Leidholt, secretary of corrections. In addition to screening for COVID-19 symptoms and quarantining those who test positive and their close contacts, they’ve restricted access to community work programs and suspended in-person visitation and volunteer opportunities.

In a statement to ABC News, Leidholt detailed additional changes, including: “revised schedules to increase social distancing, bolstered disinfection efforts and laundry services, implemented physical plant changes and adjusted admission and intake processes.”

“All inmates and staff are wearing masks,” Leidholt added.

Importantly, COVID-19 infections in South Dakota prisons don’t exist in a bubble. By every available metric, South Dakota’s COVID-19 outbreak is worsening. On Tuesday, daily infections, hospitalizations, testing positivity rate and deaths were all rising in South Dakota, according to an ABC News analysis of data from The COVID Tracking Project.

“This idea that a correctional facility can be cordoned off and sealed doesn’t reflect reality,” Beletsky said. “That’s magical thinking.”

PHOTO: A fenced area of Mike Durfee State Prison is seen in Springfield, S.D., Oct. 23, 2020. A coronavirus outbreak at the minimum-security facility has infected a notable percentage of the inmate population.

A fenced area of Mike Durfee State Prison is seen in Springfield, S.D., Oct. 23, 2020. A coronavirus outbreak at

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Columbus nonprofits to provide fresh food, pharmacy care to South Linden

Emma Scott Moran
 
| The Columbus Dispatch

The Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio will open a second location addressing low-income Franklin County residents’ food and pharmaceutical needs with its “Farmacy in the City” program. 

The nonprofit’s new site, co-located with Community Development for All People, will feature a pharmacy and fresh food market under one roof. Here, vulnerable Franklin County residents can receive non-narcotic prescription medicine, pharmacy services and healthy food at no cost. 

“Our patients may not have access to healthy food and other resources that you need to stay in those healthy habits to reduce your disease burden,” Charitable Pharmacy executive director Jennifer Seifert said. “We’re really excited now that when someone says, ‘I don’t know what to eat,’ we can bring some resources around them.”

Since 2010, CPCO has contributed $50 million in pharmacy services and prescription medicine, today serving over 60,000 Franklin county residents living at or below 200% of the federal poverty level.

More: Charitable Pharmacy sees more patients, more costs due to COVID-19

CPCO’s model is different from that of free clinics. Pharmacists spend time with patients to understand their medical history, explain the impact of their prescribed medicine and create an action plan for the future, development director Melanie Boyd said.

Despite this decade of positive impact, it’s clear that sometimes medicine isn’t the most pressing need when patients walk through the pharmacy’s doors. Basic needs such as food, shelter and clothing often take precedence. 

After receiving a $1.5 million grant from the Franklin County Board of Commissioners in 2019, CPCO began exploring communities where its support could have the most impact and identified South Linden as a place where it could help the neighborhood achieve better health outcomes.

The unfortunate truth is that one’s zip code often determines the quality of their health care.

“You go to the suburbs and look at how many pharmacies you have per capita — it’s a real different story in some other sections of the city,” Boyd said. “We know that coming in (to South Linden) as a charitable pharmacy to work with the existing pharmacies, we’re going to be able to meet more of that need.” 

When the Rev. John Edgar, executive director of Community Development for All People, approached the pharmacy about sharing Eagle Market — a South Linden carryout shut down by the city in 2016 — CPCO jumped on the opportunity. 

“Seventy percent of our patients are either screened positive for malnutrition or express food insecurity,” Boyd said. “That was one of the reasons this was just obvious, it was just such a clear fit.”

South Linden currently has no full-service grocery store, and this food scarcity has a measurable impact. Its residents have a life expectancy of just under 70 years, seven years less than the Franklin County average. 

The “Farmacy in the City” hopes to improve this disparity by fulfilling food and health needs and emphasizing the idea of “food as medicine.”

A $149,444 grant from the Connections for Cardiovascular

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South Dakota medical groups promote masks, countering Noem

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — South Dakota’s largest medical organizations on Tuesday launched a joint effort to promote mask-wearing to prevent the spread of the coronavirus as the state suffers through one of the nation’s worst outbreaks, a move that countered Gov. Kristi Noem’s position of casting doubt on the efficacy of wearing face coverings in public.

As the number of cases, hospitalizations and deaths from COVID-19 have multiplied in recent weeks, the Republican governor has tried to downplay the severity of the virus, highlighting that most people don’t die from COVID-19. Noem, who has staked out a reputation for keeping her state free from federal government mandates to stem the virus’ spread, has repeatedly countered the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s recommendations to wear face coverings in public.

Shortly after the Department of Health reported that the number of hospitalizations from COVID-19 broke records for the third straight day on Tuesday, people who represent doctors, nurses, hospitals, school administrators and businesses huddled to promote mask-wearing, social distancing and handwashing. They warned the state’s hospitals could face a tipping point in their ability to care for COVID-19 patients.

“Masking is a simple act that each one of us can participate in and it can save lives,” said Dr. Benjamin Aaker, the president of the South Dakota State Medical Association. “If you mask, that life could be your mother, father, your friend, or even your own.”

Noem’s spokesman Ian Fury said the governor does not oppose all mask-wearing, but is trying to promote a “nuanced” approach to masks. She has said it is appropriate to wear masks around people with symptoms of COVID-19 or in hospitals. But she has not encouraged people to wear face coverings in public, as recommended by the CDC.


October has already become the state’s deadliest during the pandemic, with 152 people dying. Health officials have tallied 375 total deaths from COVID-19.

The groups calling for mask-wearing detailed the upheaval caused by virus infections — from school administrators struggling to conduct contract tracing to businesses worried about the economic impacts of widespread outbreaks.

The state’s prisons have seen the greatest surge in cases in recent weeks. Roughly one out of every three inmates statewide have an active infection.

The state has reported the nation’s second-highest number of new cases per capita over the last two weeks, according to Johns Hopkins researchers. There were 1,226 new cases per 100,000 people, meaning that one in roughly every 82 people tested positive. The Department of Health reported 989 new cases on Tuesday.

The rise in hospitalizations has forced the state’s two largest hospital systems — Sanford Health and Avera Health — to alter the logistics of some elective procedures to free up space for the influx of COVID-19 patients.

There were 395 people hospitalized by COVID-19 statewide, according to the Department of Health. About 34% of general-care hospital beds and 38% of Intensive Care Units statewide remained available on Tuesday.

Health care providers will hit an unmanageable load of

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South Korea urges people to get flu vaccinations despite concerns about deaths

South Korean commuters wear protective masks as they crowd after getting off the subway during rush hour on September 15, 2020 in Seoul, South Korea.

Chung Sung-Jun | Getty Images

South Korea urged citizens to get vaccinated against influenza and reduce the chances of an outbreak that coincides with the battle on the coronavirus, as it kicked off free inoculations for the last eligible group.

Public anxiety over the safety of flu vaccines has surged after at least 48 people died this month following vaccinations, while, last month, about 5 million doses had to be disposed of after not being stored at recommended temperatures.

Authorities have said they found no direct link between the deaths and the flu shots and have sought to reassure South Koreans about the safety of the vaccines against flu, a disease that kills at least 3,000 each year.

“Vaccination offers far greater benefits compared to side effects, and both the WHO and domestic and overseas experts agree,” Health Minister Park Neung-hoo told a briefing on Sunday, in a reference to the World Health Organization.

Last year, more than 1,500 elderly people died within seven days of receiving flu vaccines, but those deaths were not linked to the vaccinations, the government said.

As South Korea presses on with its inoculations, southeast Asia’s tiny city state of Singapore became one of the first nations this week to call a temporary halt to the use of two influenza vaccines, as a precaution.

Singapore has reported no deaths linked to flu vaccinations.

South Korea ordered 20% more flu vaccines this year to ward off the prospect of what it calls a “twindemic” of concurrent major flu and coronavirus outbreaks in winter.

At least 1,154 instances of adverse reactions have been reported from among more than 9.4 million people inoculated since the effort began in September.

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South Korea urges people to get flu vaccinations despite death tolls

By Sangmi Cha

SEOUL (Reuters) – South Korea urged citizens to get vaccinated against influenza and reduce the chances of an outbreak that coincides with the battle on the coronavirus, as it kicked off free inoculations for the last eligible group.

Public anxiety over the safety of flu vaccines has surged after at least 48 people died this month following vaccinations, while, last month, about 5 million doses had to be disposed of after not being stored at recommended temperatures.

Authorities have said they found no direct link between the deaths and the flu shots and have sought to reassure South Koreans about the safety of the vaccines against flu, a disease that kills at least 3,000 each year.

“Vaccination offers far greater benefits compared to side effects, and both the WHO and domestic and overseas experts agree,” Health Minister Park Neung-hoo told a briefing on Sunday, in a reference to the World Health Organization.

Last year, more than 1,500 elderly people died within seven days of receiving flu vaccines, but those deaths were not linked to the vaccinations, the government said.

As South Korea presses on with its inoculations, southeast Asia’s tiny city state of Singapore became one of the first nations this week to call a temporary halt to the use of two influenza vaccines, as a precaution.

Singapore has reported no deaths linked to flu vaccinations.

South Korea ordered 20% more flu vaccines this year to ward off the prospect of what it calls a “twindemic” of concurrent major flu and coronavirus outbreaks in winter.

At least 1,154 instances of adverse reactions have been reported from among more than 9.4 million people inoculated since the effort began in September.

(Interactive graphic tracking global spread of coronavirus: https://graphics.reuters.com/world-coronavirus-tracker-and-maps)

(Reporting by Sangmi Cha; Editing by Miyoung Kim and Clarence Fernandez)

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South Korean authorities stick to flu vaccine plan after deaths rise to 48

By Heekyong Yang

SEOUL (Reuters) – The number of South Koreans who have died after getting flu shots has risen to 48, the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency (KDCA) said on Saturday, adding that the vaccines would continue to reduce the chance of having simultaneous epidemics.

The health authorities said they found no direct link between the deaths and the shots. They plan to carry on with the state-run vaccination programme to try to avoid having to fight both the flu and the coronavirus over the coming winter.

“After reviewing death cases so far, it is not the time to suspend a flu vaccination programme since vaccination is very crucial this year, considering … the COVID-19 outbreaks,” KDCA Director Jeong Eun-kyung told a briefing.

Jeong said the review had shown no direct link between the flu shots and the 26 deaths that have been investigated.

Some 20 initial autopsy results from the police and the National Forensic Service showed that 13 people died of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and other disorders not caused by the vaccination.

The death toll among those who have been vaccinated rose by 12 cases from a day earlier to 48 on Saturday.

The rising deaths have caused some doctors and politicians to call for a halt to the government campaign to vaccinate about 30 million of the country’s 54 million people.

While encouraging people to get flu vaccines, Jeong issued precautions to take before getting the shot, such as drinking enough water and telling healthcare workers about any underlying medical conditions. She also advised people to wait 15-30 minutes before leaving the clinic where they receive their vaccine.

“If possible, try to get the flu shot when it’s warm, since there are concerns that low temperatures could affect cardiovascular disease or cerebrovascular disease,” she said.

The KDCA said 9.4 million people had been inoculated as of Friday in the programme that began in September, with 1,154 cases of adverse reactions.

South Korea reported 77 new coronavirus cases as of Friday midnight, bringing total infections to 25,775, with 457 deaths.

(Reporting by Heekyong Yang; Editing by Tom Hogue)

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