Travis Roy, a hockey player, son, and friend, has died

But last month, shortly before the surgery, when we met for what would be the last time, at his Vermont home overlooking Lake Champlain, he didn’t want to talk about that.

He didn’t want people to worry about him. Not the paralyzed people and their families whom he had counseled and helped. Not the young hockey players, boys and girls, who had met and been inspired by him.

After so many years in a wheelchair, getting through and healing from such surgery posed many serious risks to his health. He wanted to engage in this fight with only his family and closest friends knowing of the threat it posed to his life.

He never had the luxury of dealing with his hockey injury privately. His was the most public of catastrophes, witnessed by thousands of fans at the Walter Brown Arena at Boston University. His was a story that would eventually be known by millions.

Travis Roy watched a BU hockey game in 2005.
Travis Roy watched a BU hockey game in 2005.Hunt, Justine Globe Staff

What happened when he was just 20 years old, only 11 seconds into his first shift as a Boston University Terrier, fulfilling a dream that he pursued with singular determination since he first laced up skates as a boy in North Yarmouth, Maine, was a sobering reminder of how fragile life is, of how vulnerable even elite athletes are.

The random cruelty that befell him touched so many. So many people, especially in New England, felt it vicariously.

What was truly extraordinary and inspirational was how Travis responded to his catastrophic injury. Within a year, he returned to BU.

Rather than concentrate fully on his own rehabilitation, which on its own was overwhelming, he began thinking of ways to help others in similar circumstances. In a culture that is notably self-absorbed, his reaction was to use his own tragic situation to create opportunities for those in similar circumstances with less support and resources.

Boston University players celebrate around former player Travis Roy, center top, and the Hockey East Trophy after defeating New Hampshire 4-2 in the 1997 Hockey East Finals.
Boston University players celebrate around former player Travis Roy, center top, and the Hockey East Trophy after defeating New Hampshire 4-2 in the 1997 Hockey East Finals.WINSLOW TOWNSON

He was just 21 years old, still trying to figure out how to negotiate a wheelchair around the BU campus, when he started a foundation to help fund research and buy adaptive equipment for others who are paralyzed.

Travis raised millions for the foundation, but just as important he raised spirits, of people living with paralysis and their families, and awareness, so that others who knew nothing about paralysis might be moved to act.

Anyone who heard him speak will know what I mean when I say he was awe-inspiring in the most understated way. Just by telling his story, Travis provided one of life’s greatest gifts: perspective.

In his moments of despair, and given the hand that life dealt him they were remarkably rare, Travis worried about being a burden.

During our last conversation, he talked of especially not wanting to be a burden to his parents, Lee and

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Father runs around hospital for 4-year-old son with cancer

There were two thoughts pushing Kolt Codner forward in his first marathon race: his 4-year-old son Andrew’s fight against cancer and the hospital that provides him care.



a group of people in a park: An Ohio dad ran his first marathon to support his son fighting cancer and raise money for Akron Children's Hospital.


© Courtesy Akron Children’s Hospital
An Ohio dad ran his first marathon to support his son fighting cancer and raise money for Akron Children’s Hospital.

Codner, of Poland, Ohio, ran 26.2 miles around Akron Children’s Hospital on October 17 to raise money for the hospital treating his son, who has 26 months left in his treatment.

In early May, Codner and his wife Tristan received a phone call that Andrew had a bed waiting for him in the hematology and oncology unit of the hospital.

A day that began as a visit to the pediatrician for Andrew’s swollen face had resulted in a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a common childhood cancer.

Codner’s run served to show his appreciation to the hospital staff that has turned a traumatic experience like cancer treatment into one his young son faces bravely, Codner says.

“The folks at Akron Children’s have taken something that should be scary and terrifying and made it this amazing badge of honor to recognize the superhero that he is,” Codner told CNN. “We couldn’t think of a better thing to contribute to and spend time trying to help raise funds to ensure that all kids have access to the same amazing experience as Andrew has had at Akron Children’s.”

Codner participated in the race as part of the virtual FirstEnergy Akron Marathon, Half Marathon & Team Relay, which replaced the hospital’s yearly marathon due to the coronavirus pandemic. According to the virtual marathon guidelines, runners can race at any location or pace, and Codner decided to run his marathon around the hospital to spotlight their work.

On the day of the race, Codner wrote Andrew’s name on the top of his running shoes to keep him motivated. Friends and family were stationed outside the hospital to cheer him on, in a course that took 5 hours and 35 laps to complete. His son was even able to run with him across the finish line and award him a medal.

“To see him running and doing that last lap with me was just incredible,” Codner said.

By the end of the run, Codner had raised 10 times more than his initial goal of $1,000, according to a hospital press release. The fund has reached over $13,000 in donations and has expanded its window until November 30.

Dr. Megan Sampson, a pediatric oncologist who has treated Andrew at the hospital, praises the Codner family.

“It just amazed me that during this scary time that he was thinking about doing this,” said Sampson, referring to Codner’s run and the attention he has drawn to the hospital’s work.

Andrew’s prognosis is good and he’s responding well to the treatment he has received, but he still has a long way to go, Sampson says.



Kolt Codner's son awards him with a medal after completing his marathon to raise money for Akron Children's Hospital.


© Courtesy Akron Children’s Hospital
Kolt Codner’s son awards him with a

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Parents claim son suffers irreparable damage after trip to the dentist

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (WAFF) – The parents of a two-year-old said their child was left in crippling agony after a trip to the dentist office earlier this week.



a woman sitting on a bench: Chance Roberson with his mom and dad after coming home from the hospital.


© Provided by Huntsville-Decatur WAFF
Chance Roberson with his mom and dad after coming home from the hospital.

What was expected to be a routine cleaning ended with a child hospitalized and the parents taking legal action.

Two-year-old Chance had his first cleaning when the hygienist told his parents he had decay on his front teeth. They were told four silver crowns were needed to prevent future problems.

The parents agreed but said what happened in the exam room was something they never expected.

“His mouth had completely swollen up,” said Monica Roberson. “There was so much bruising, I took him to the emergency room directly after leaving there.”

Chance Roberson is on the mend, but his parents are still looking for an explanation. “They got mid-way through the process and said they can’t do any more and left them as they were because they filed them down too far.”

Monica and Donavyn took their two-year-old son to see a dentist at Children’s Dentistry of Huntsville. They were told Chance needed four caps for his four front teeth.

“The nurse kept saying, I don’t understand we don’t normally do procedures on children this small,” said Donavyn Larry. “It is not our specialty. I kept thinking why are you doing it then?”

Unaware to the parents, Chance also needed a root canal due to tooth decay.  “The whole process was just uncomfortable for everybody. You could tell it was kind of a panic situation when they realize they couldn’t do anything,” said Roberson.

A family member posted photos following the procedure on social media where they were shared more than one-thousand times.  The family also hired attorney Will League to represent them.

He told us, “This case falls under the Alabama Medical Liability Act.  The applicable standard of care requires proof, through expert testimony, that no reasonable dentist would have done what this dentist did.  The standard of care also requires the physician or dentist to fully explain the procedure along with its risks and benefits to the patient and obtain consent to proceed.”

We reached out to Children’s Dentistry of Huntsville. The office manager told me no one in the office would be available to comment due to the ongoing legal action.

I also reached out to the UAB Dentistry School and other pediatric dentists in the area, but no one felt comfortable commenting on the situation without first reviewing patient records.

A dentist who did not want to go on camera said root canals are one of the most common treatments performed on baby teeth. The procedure is typically performed on a tooth that has been infected, usually a result of tooth decay.

“I know you need to have some of the teeth grind down when you put a cap in but nothing to that severity. No, I wasn’t aware of

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NEET 2020 Tamil Nadu Shepherd’s Son Who Cracked Medical Entrance Exam NEET Needs Help To Study Medicine

Tamil Nadu Shepherd's Son Who Cracked NEET Needs Help To Study Medicine

Tamil Nadu government school topper Jeevith Kumar has cleared medical entrance exam NEET with 664 marks.

Chennai:

A Tamil Nadu student, the son of a shepherd father and a tailor mother, has not only cracked the all-India medical college entrance exam NEET, but topped among candidates from state’s government schools. His family, however, has no means to pay for his college fee.

“My family can’t even afford the admission fee for a government medical college. I need help so I could pursue my further studies,” Jeevith Kumar, who cleared NEET on his second attempt, told NDTV.

Jeevith Kumar’s journey so far has not been without struggle.

Even though he secured 548 out of 600 in Class 12 last year, Jeevith could only score 193 marks in the medical entrance exam without private tuition. Seeing untapped potential in the teenager, teacher-turned-activist R Sabarimala posted a video appealing for help on the social media.

Things changed for him after help came from a Good Samaritan in the US who paid Rs 75,000 to get him enrolled in a private coaching centre for a year-long residential programme that costs Rs 1.15 lakh. His teachers also pitched in to help and this time he has scored 664 in NEET.

“Right from his first day in school, I had always prayed to God to give him good teachers. They have made all this possible. He did not follow English coaching earlier but teachers motivated him to just study. I have another son and a daughter,” said Jeevith’s mother, who adds to the family’s income by doing tailoring under the 100-day work programme.

Jeevith, however, never aspired to be a doctor but took it as a challenge when HE saw many aspirants die by suicide over the last few years on failing in the test.

Asked if he could have cracked the medical entrance exam without private coaching, Jeevith said, “No way. It was the coaching that made it possible for me. I want to help many poor students like me become doctors. After becoming a doctor I’ll reach out to poor patients.”

As Jeevith seeks help to secure his future, a key bill that could help many students like him awaits clearance by the Governor.

In September, the Tamil Nadu assembly had passed a bill to reserve 7.5 per cent seats in medical colleges for government school students. However, BJP-appointed Governor Banwarilal Purohit is yet to sign it or reject it. Any further delay in passing the bill could deny opportunity for around 300 NEET-qualified students from government schools.

The Tamil Nadu assembly passed the bill after it failed to get an exemption for state students from appearing in NEET. For nearly a decade the state had abolished the medical entrance exam and made admission on the basis of marks secured in class 12. Successive state governments have argued that the NEET favours the affluent, who can afford private coaching, and denies opportunity to the poor and those from rural backgrounds who score well in

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Melania Trump says son Barron also had COVID-19 [Video]

In a personal post on the White House website, first lady Melania Trump for the first time shared details of her illness from COVID-19 and revealed that — in addition to her and President Donald Trump – their 14-year-old son, Barron, also tested positive for the virus but exhibited no symptoms.

Trump kept his comment’s brief on his sons health on his way to a rally in Iowa.

TRUMP: “Barron’s fine.”

Melania Trump said Barron initially tested negative but then was positive, calling him a “strong teenager” who exhibited no symptoms. He has since tested negative.

She also said her symptoms were “minimal,” writing: “I experienced body aches, a cough and headaches, and felt extremely tired most of the time.”

Her husband, meanwhile, spent three nights in a military hospital. He underwent several treatments, one of which is used in the most extreme COVID cases.

Mrs. Trump says she opted for vitamins and healthy food.

The first lady said in “one way” she was glad the three went through the ordeal at the same time so they could take care of one another and spend time together.

Video Transcript

In a personal post on the White House website, First Lady Melania Trump, for the first time, shared details of her illness from COVID-19 and revealed that in addition to her and President Trump, their 14-year-old son, Barron, also tested positive for the virus, but exhibited no symptoms. President Trump kept his comments brief on his son’s health on his way to a rally in Iowa.

[CHEERING]

DONALD TRUMP: Barron’s fine.

Melania Trump said Barron initially tested negative but was then positive, calling him a strong teenager who exhibited no symptoms. He has since tested negative. She also said her symptoms were minimal, writing, “I experienced body aches, a cough, and headaches, and felt extremely tired most of the time.”

Her husband, meanwhile, spent three nights in the military hospital. He underwent several treatments, one of which is used in the most extreme COVID cases. Mrs. Trump says she opted for vitamins and healthy food.

The First Lady said, in one, way she was glad the three went through the ordeal at the same time so they could take care of one another and spend time together.

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