Diaceutics Launches World’s First Diagnostic Network for Precision Medicine to Solve Global Cancer Testing Issues

Diaceutics today launches world’s first digital platform solution to broken testing ecosystem DXRX – The Diagnostic Network®

Global pharma companies, labs and diagnostic companies are leveraging the platform with 38 laboratories and diagnostic companies onboarded and two pharma companies piloting the platform

DXRX provides access to pipeline of global diagnostic testing data on one secure platform and enables industry-wide collaboration to accelerate biomarker test adoption and time to peak therapy prescription from years to months

Early collaborations are now live on DXRX to address real-world cancer testing issues such as PD-L1 reimbursement in the US, and EQA Provision for NGS testing in EU and Asia

Diaceutics PLC, (AIM: DXRX), today announces the launch of DXRX – The Diagnostic Network® which has been designed to accelerate the end-to-end development and commercialization of precision medicine diagnostics by reducing time to peak biomarker test adoption for cancer testing from years to months. As a solution to today’s broken testing ecosystem, DXRX brings together stakeholders from across the industry to collaborate in a vibrant marketplace to solve real-world testing issues in a secure, standardized way for patients.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201028005588/en/

Sarah Colgan, Head of Global Marketing at Diaceutics (Photo: Business Wire)

DXRX integrates a pipeline of global diagnostic testing data into one secure platform providing access to transparent, real-time reporting on diagnostic utilization at a local level across multiple therapeutic areas.

Early collaborations between pharma, labs and diagnostic companies are live on the platform’s marketplace with 38 Laboratories and Diagnostic Companies onboarded from across EU, Asia and the US. These collaborations are designed to improve test standardization, reimbursement, regulatory support and External Quality Assessment (EQA). Collaborators today include Synlab, PathGroup (US), SRL Diagnostics (Asia), Fundación Jimenez Díaz, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Istituto Nazionale Tumori Regina Elena Roma and Diatech Pharmacogenetics (EU). Two global pharmaceutical clients are also piloting the technology.

The platform enables pharma clients to monitor and enhance test quality at local level to increase return on investment across multiple brands, and leverage a broad network of local partnership opportunities to implement best-in-class testing for their precision medicine portfolios. DXRX also enables clients to outsource the end-to-end diagnostic development and commercialization process from biomarker discovery to in-market test availability in order to reduce time to market for new therapies.

Furthermore, DXRX also provides users access to a global expert advisory panel of key opinion leaders from the areas of oncology, including lung cancer research and colorectal research; pathology, including tissue pathology and uropathology; molecular diagnostics; digital image analysis; telemedicine and informatics; external quality assessment (EQA); and FDA-expertise.

The end-to-end service offering provided by DXRX is enabled by a growing network of industry leading service providers in 51 countries. They cover precision medicine diagnostics to deliver implementation services such as test standardization, reimbursement, regulatory support and External Quality Assessment (EQA). Recent partnerships include Histocyte Laboratories, Targos Molecular Pathology, EMQN CIC, CPQA-ACP, NordiQC and UKNEQAS ICC & ISH.

An

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Local Teens Help Solve Flint’s Water Crisis with New Lab and Water Testing: ‘It Gives Me Hope’

Flint Community Lab

During the summer of 2014, thousands of people in the close-knit, industrial city of Flint, Michigan — “Flintstoners,” as they proudly call themselves — saw their lives change in an instant.

In an effort to save money, the city switched its water supply from the Detroit River to the Flint River. Residents immediately complained about the water’s smell and taste and reported worrying symptoms including hair loss, rashes, and seizures.

Tests ordered in August revealed E. coli was in Flint’s water, and parts of the city were ordered to boil the water before drinking it. Elected officials denied for over a year that the city’s water was also contaminated with lead, but they finally acknowledged that the water wasn’t safe in September 2015.

The crisis is still fresh in the minds of many residents who continue to experience long-term health effects and are wary of their water.

Now, a group of local high school and college students is hoping to restore trust in the water system among their neighbors through the new McKenzie Patrice Croom Flint Community Lab, also known as the Flint Community Water Lab. For the next three years, they will work alongside chemists from the University of Michigan to test the water in more than 20,000 Flint homes and share the results.

RELATED: How Sick Are the Kids in Flint? Inside the Shocking Health Effects of the Devastating Water Crisis

The lab began as a pilot program in 2018 between the Flint Development Center and regional non-profit organization Freshwater Future and officially opened last month with the support of donors, including the University of Michigan, Thermo Fisher Scientific and The Nalgene Water Fund.

Markeysa Peterson, 17, tells PEOPLE she joined the lab to help people struggling in the wake of the crisis. Her nephew Curtis was diagnosed with autism due to lead contamination.

“We have to go through the everyday struggle of teaching him how to develop and function,” she says. “The crisis has made me a bit mentally distraught — everybody in Flint is struggling because we don’t have the attention or support that we deserve.”

In August, Michigan announced that it would pay $600 million to the victims of the Flint Water Crisis, but some residents say money doesn’t solve leftover issues from the crisis.

“Everything from the water plant to our tap needs to be completed replaced in order for us to feel safe,” says Carma Lewis, who has spent most of her life in Flint. “We’re sending our babies into these old school buildings where they still don’t have safe water and they’re using bottled water.”

For more on the Flint Community Water Lab, pick up the latest issue of PEOPLE or subscribe here.

Flint Community Lab Flint Community Lab

Lewis points out that having local teens and leaders running the lab is especially important to her, and she plans on getting her water tested regularly.

“It gives me hope,” she says. “I have more faith in kids

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Whoever wins in November is going to have to solve the Covid-19 crisis

This week, we ask the question: What comes next for America and Covid-19? Regardless of who is elected in November, we will still be in the midst of a pandemic and facing multiple challenges in addressing it. Culture clashes over mask-wearing, social distancing and vaccines are just a few. We’ll tackle those in our CNN Digital video discussion, but first we start with public policy. Here, two former public officials — Sylvia Mathews Burwell and Frances Fragos Townsend — come together to tell us what should come next.



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© Provided by CNN


Despite the deep divisions ravaging our country ahead of the presidential elections, many Americans are looking for answers to a common threat — the coronavirus. As the daily number of cases and deaths have risen, we remain in the throes of a pandemic that has killed more than 225,000 of our fellow citizens and torpedoed our economy. Indeed, the US is averaging more than 68,000 new cases a day.

Regardless of whether Trump or Joe Biden wins the election, though, the next president will confront a dual challenge: managing the current pandemic and ensuring that the country and the world are better prepared when the next plague strikes — as it inevitably will.

It is past time for the nation to make the investments we need to prevent, detect and respond quickly to emerging infectious diseases, like the coronavirus, before they sicken Americans and force catastrophic economic shutdowns. That is the main finding of a bipartisan task force sponsored by the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), which we were honored to chair.

Here at home, three of the most glaring failures relate to testing, science-based communication and the protection of vulnerable populations.

Nothing has undercut the US response to Covid-19 more than the failure to develop — to this day — a comprehensive nationwide system of testing and tracing that allows public health authorities to rapidly identify infected individuals and their contacts in order to isolate the sick from healthy populations. Without this timely information, authorities are too often flying blind, uncertain of the trajectory of the disease, slow to identify hot spots and unable to stop the spread of the virus through targeted measures that do not require shutting down entire communities and economies.



Sylvia Mathews Burwell wearing a purple shirt


© Jeff Watts/American University
Sylvia Mathews Burwell

The US experience on testing and contact tracing stands in contrast to nations like South Korea, which rapidly ramped up nationwide testing and successfully mobilized an army of contact tracers. The US cannot put itself in this position again.

The success of public health measures like contact tracing, mask-wearing, and social distancing depends on individuals and communities trusting and adhering to advice from medical professionals and scientists, sometimes delivered by elected and other officials. That public trust must be earned and sustained.

Elected US officials, including the President, often have fallen short as communicators in this pandemic. To prevent future pandemics from becoming a political football, public officials at all levels, from the White

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