Global Medical Marijuana Market Demand to Show Superior Growth Despite the Spread of COVID-19

The medical marijuana market is poised to grow by USD 22.33 billion during 2020-2024 progressing at a CAGR of over 24% during the forecast period.

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Technavio has announced its latest market research report titled Global Medical Marijuana Market 2020-2024 (Graphic: Business Wire)

Technavio suggests three forecast scenarios (optimistic, probable, and pessimistic) considering the impact of COVID-19. Download Free Sample Report on COVID-19 Recovery Analysis

The report on the medical marijuana market provides a holistic update, market size and forecast, trends, growth drivers, and challenges, as well as vendor analysis.

The report offers an up-to-date analysis regarding the current global market scenario, the latest trends and drivers, and the overall market environment. The market is driven by the increasing production of medical marijuana.

The medical marijuana market analysis includes application and geography landscape. This study identifies the increase in funding for research and production of medical marijuana as one of the prime reasons driving the medical marijuana market growth during the next few years.

This report presents a detailed picture of the market by the way of study, synthesis, and summation of data from multiple sources by an analysis of key parameters

The Medical Marijuana Market covers the following areas:

Medical Marijuana Market Sizing

Medical Marijuana Market Forecast

Medical Marijuana Market Analysis

Companies Mentioned

  • Aphria Inc.

  • Aurora Cannabis Inc.

  • Cannabis Sativa, Inc.

  • Canopy Growth Corp.

  • Cronos Group Inc.

  • GW Pharmaceuticals Plc

  • mCig Inc.

  • Medical Marijuana, Inc.

  • United Cannabis Corp.

  • Vivo Cannabis, Inc.

     

Key Topics Covered:

PART 01: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

PART 02: SCOPE OF THE REPORT

PART 03: MARKET LANDSCAPE

PART 04: MARKET SIZING

PART 05: FIVE FORCES ANALYSIS

PART 06: MARKET SEGMENTATION BY APPLICATION

  • Market segmentation by application

  • Comparison by application

  • Chronic pain – Market size and forecast 2019-2024

  • Nausea – Market size and forecast 2019-2024

  • Others – Market size and forecast 2019-2024

  • Market opportunity by application

PART 07: CUSTOMER LANDSCAPE

PART 08: GEOGRAPHIC LANDSCAPE

  • Geographic segmentation

  • Geographic comparison

  • North America – Market size and forecast 2019-2024

  • Europe – Market size and forecast 2019-2024

  • APAC – Market size and forecast 2019-2024

  • South America – Market size and forecast 2019-2024

  • MEA – Market size and forecast 2019-2024

  • Key leading countries

  • Market opportunity

PART 09: DECISION FRAMEWORK

PART 10: DRIVERS AND CHALLENGES

  • Market drivers

  • Market challenges

PART 11: MARKET TRENDS

  • Increasing number of awareness campaigns

  • Launch of medical marijuana education programs

  • Increase in funding for research and production of medical marijuana

PART 12: VENDOR LANDSCAPE

  • Overview

  • Landscape disruption

  • Competitive scenario

PART 13: VENDOR ANALYSIS

PART 14: APPENDIX

PART 15: EXPLORE TECHNAVIO

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Technavio is a leading global technology research and advisory company. Their research and analysis focuses on emerging market trends and provides actionable insights to help businesses identify market opportunities and develop effective strategies to optimize their market positions. With over 500 specialized analysts, Technavio’s report library consists of more than 17,000 reports and counting, covering 800 technologies, spanning across 50 countries. Their client base consists of enterprises of all

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Tests Show Genetic Signature of Coronavirus That Likely Infected Trump

President Trump’s illness from a coronavirus infection last month was the most significant health crisis for a sitting president in nearly 40 years. Yet little remains known about how the virus arrived at the White House and how it spread.

The administration did not take basic steps to track the outbreak, limiting contact tracing, keeping cases a secret and cutting out the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The origin of the infections, a spokesman said, was “unknowable.”

But one standard public health technique may still shed some light: tracking the cluster’s genetic fingerprints.

To better understand the outbreak, The Times worked with prominent geneticists to determine the genetic sequence of viruses that infected two Times journalists believed to been exposed to the coronavirus as part of their work covering the White House.

The study reveals, for the first time, the genetic sequence of the virus that may have infected President Trump and dozens of others, researchers said. That genome is a crucial clue that may allow researchers to identify where the outbreak originated and whether it went on to infect others across the country.

The White House has not disclosed any effort to conduct similar genetic testing, but the study’s results show that it is still possible, even weeks after positive tests. Additional sequencing could help establish the path of the virus through the White House, the role of a possible super-spreading event for Judge Amy Coney Barrett and the origin of an outbreak among the staff of Vice President Mike Pence in the last week or so.

The journalists, Michael D. Shear and Al Drago, both had significant, separate exposure to White House officials in late September, several days before they developed symptoms. They did not spend any time near each other in the weeks before their positive tests.

Mr. Shear traveled with Mr. Trump and other staff on Air Force One on Sept. 26, when Mr. Trump approached within five or six feet without a mask. Mr. Drago covered the Judge Barrett event that day and a news conference the next day near officials who were not wearing masks and later tested positive.

The viral genomes of the two journalists shared the same distinct pattern of mutations, the research found. Along with their exposure history, the findings suggest that they were infected as part of the broader White House outbreak, said Trevor Bedford, a geneticist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington who led the research team.

“These mutations that are possessed by these viruses are quite rare in the United States,” Dr. Bedford said. “I am highly convinced that these viruses come from the same outbreak or cluster based on their genomes.”

The study, which has been posted online but not yet peer reviewed or published in a science journal, followed academic protocols that require genetic samples to be anonymous. Mr. Shear and Mr. Drago chose to disclose their identities for this article.

Viruses constantly mutate, picking up tiny, accidental alterations

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A Health Care Worker’s New Normal : The Picture Show : NPR

The daughter of health care worker in the New York City area portrays her family during the pandemic. Her photography gives witness to her mother’s determination to live fully in a new normal. — Laura Beltrán Villamizar, NPR photo editor

Raymonde Elian no longer does her hair and makeup before work. No more earrings. But she still aims to look “neat and clean” as it helps her feel in good spirit.

Melissa Bunni Elian


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Melissa Bunni Elian

Raymonde Elian no longer does her hair and makeup before work. No more earrings. But she still aims to look “neat and clean” as it helps her feel in good spirit.

Melissa Bunni Elian

My mother works as an emergency room technician at NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital in Bronxville, N.Y. This year, while I sought ways to work online and my father telecommuted, my mother has been risking her life to take care of others.

My mom is one of the health care workers you meet in the triage ward. Maybe she drew your blood or monitored your heart. If you succumb to the coronavirus, she’d be one of the staffers transporting your body to the overflowing morgue.

I wasn’t able to photograph her at the hospital. So like other photojournalists confined to their homes, I turned the camera to my own life and family. I focused on what I’ve always seen: my mother’s rituals and the subtle changes around our home.

In the spring, before wearing masks was common, my mother wouldn’t leave the house without one. She’d return from a 12-hour shift with trenches dug into her face by the N95 she had to reuse for a week at a time.

Many Americans have now returned to a semblance of life, but frontline families like ours continue to bear the greatest risk in this pandemic.

Health care workers were forced to come up with ways to preserve N95 masks. Raymonde Elian wore three masks so that the N95 was less exposed.

Melissa Bunni Elian


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Melissa Bunni Elian

Health care workers were forced to come up with ways to preserve N95 masks. Raymonde Elian wore three masks so that the N95 was less exposed.

Melissa Bunni Elian

When my mother left Haiti in 1979, she left behind my infant older sister and my father, who worked as an accountant at an elementary school. In the U.S., my mother initially assembled hand saws in a steel tool factory while attending school, then as a cashier at a department store.

By the time I was born in 1987, she and my father were both working in corporate America. My mom was working at an investment firm, but she had other career interests, so she began taking courses at Iona College. A philosophy course on death and dying inspired her to leave the corporate world.

At age 38, she began working in child care and then as a nurse’s aid, all while caring for our family and taking

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Singapore MMA show test case for return of sports fans

Singapore’s pilot initiative to carry out rapid coronavirus testing to allow fans into a One Championship MMA show could show the way for other countries to host sports events during the pandemic, organisers said.

Sports have been slowly resuming worldwide after a months-long shutdown, but many events have gone ahead with no spectators, to reduce infection risks.

Up to 250 mask-wearing fans on Friday will attend the mixed martial arts card, “One: Inside the Matrix”, at an indoor stadium — the city state’s first sports event with an audience for months.

The screenings are part of a government pilot programme under which people will be tested for Covid-19 before large-scale gatherings, and comes as Singapore prepares to further ease restrictions as its outbreak slows.

Fans will have to get negative results in antigen tests, which can identify at least 80 percent of infected people and provide results in about 15 minutes.

“This is a first for Singapore and if we are successful, will pave the way for others to follow as we safely return to some normalcy,” said Teh Hua Fung, group president of One Championship, Asia’s biggest MMA promotion.

“They can’t be isolating, waiting (a long time) for the results beforehand.”

Spectators will also sit apart from one another to reduce the risk of infection, and no food and drinks will be on sale, with fans instead given goody bags.

“People are dying to watch, even if they have to socially distance,” Teh said. 

“It’s going to be a different experience… But it’s a start.”

Ninety-eight people, including 42 athletes, have been flown into the city state for the event featuring six fights. Fifteen fights will also be pre-recorded for release at a later date.

Two men from the United States and Russia assisting the fighters tested positive for the virus on Tuesday, but the results were determined to be from previous infections, organisers said.

They were tested again on Thursday, and will only be allowed to participate if the latest tests show negative results.

One Championship was unable to hold matches for almost four months because of the pandemic, but it resumed in China in June and staged its first international event in Singapore this month, without fans.

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Ask the Doctors: Studies show fitness trackers can predict illness | Health

Dear Doctors: My husband caught a cold this summer, and he swears the readings from his fitness tracker a few days before warned him that he was about to be sick. Do you think that’s really possible?

Dear Reader: Your husband’s observations about how changes in the data from his fitness tracker preceded the onset of a cold actually dovetail with the findings of a study that were published at the start of the year. And it’s not the first research of its kind to make the connection. With millions of people now using fitness trackers, scientists are diving into the trove of uploaded data to see what the details may be able to reveal about public health.

For anyone unfamiliar with fitness trackers, they’re wearable sensors, much like a wristwatch, that measure a range of activity and health metrics. Depending on the device — there are dozens of different brands and types — fitness trackers measure steps taken, total mileage, speed, direction, elevation climbed and duration of activity. On the physiological side of things, they can track heart rate, heart rhythms, skin temperature and minutes of sleep. Some manufacturers even claim that, using motion sensors and algorithms, their models can map how long someone spends in the various stages of sleep. (Full disclosure: Many sleep specialists are skeptical about the accuracy of the sleep-stage results.)

In a recent study, researchers from the Scripps Research Translational Institute analyzed data collected from the fitness trackers of 47,000 adult women and men. Using a minimum of two months’ worth of readings taken over the course of two years, which included activity, heart rate and sleep, the researchers found that their predictions of regional flu outbreaks matched the statistical data collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during those same time periods. An earlier study, published by researchers at Stanford University in early 2017, had come to similar conclusions. In that study, the scientists collected 250,000 daily readings from just 43 individuals over the course of a year. The participants wore a range of biosensors, which collected information about daily activity, heart rate, oxygen saturation levels, skin temperature and sleep data. They even tracked exposure to radiation, such as the X-rays and gamma rays encountered in air travel.

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Two COVID-19 Outpatient Antibody Drugs Show Encouraging Results

Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center.

Two COVID-19 antibody treatments, one developed by Regeneron and the other by Eli Lilly, show promise in the outpatient setting in results released on Wednesday.

Regeneron, in a randomized, double-blind trial, is assessing the effect of adding its investigational antibody cocktail REGN-COV2 to usual standard of care in comparison with adding placebo to standard of care. A descriptive analysis from the first 275 patients was previously reported. The data described Wednesday, which involve an additional 524 patients, show that the trial met all of the first nine endpoints.

Regeneron announced prospective results from its phase 2/3 trial showing REGN-COV2 significantly reduced viral load and patient medical visits, which included hospitalizations, visits to an emergency department, visits for urgent care, and/or physician office/telemedicine visits.

Interest in the cocktail spiked after President Donald Trump extolled its benefits after it was used in his own COVID-19 treatment earlier this month.

Trump received the highest dose of the drug, 8 g, but, according to a Regeneron news release announcing the latest findings, “results showed no significant difference in virologic or clinical efficacy between the REGN-COV2 high dose (8 grams) and low dose (2.4 grams).”

The company described further results of the industry-funded study in the release: “On the primary endpoint, the average daily change in viral load through day 7 (mean time-weighted average change from baseline) in patients with high viral load (defined as greater than107 copies/mL) was a 0.68 log10 copies/mL greater reduction with REGN-COV2 compared to placebo (combined dose groups; p<0.0001). There was a 1.08 log greater reduction with REGN-COV2 treatment by day 5, which corresponds to REGN-COV2 patients having, on average, a greater than 10-fold reduction in viral load, compared to placebo.”

The treatment appears to be most effective in patients most at risk, whether because of high viral load, ineffective baseline antibody immune response, or preexisting conditions, according to the researchers.

According to the press release, these results have not been peer reviewed but have been submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration, which is reviewing a potential emergency use authorization for the treatment in high-risk adults with mild to moderate COVID-19.

Operation Warp Speed, the Trump administration’s treatment and vaccine program, contracted in July with Regeneron for up to 300,000 doses of its antibody cocktail.

Lilly Treatment Shows Drop in Hospitalizations, Symptoms

Another treatment, also given in the outpatient setting, shows promise as well.

Patients recently diagnosed with mild to moderate COVID-19 who received Eli Lilly’s antibody treatment LY-CoV555 had fewer hospitalizations and symptoms compared with a group that received placebo, an interim analysis of a phase 2 trial indicates.

Peter Chen, MD, with the Department of Medicine, Women’s Guild Lung Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, and colleagues found that the most profound effects were in the high-risk groups.

The interim findings of the BLAZE-1 study, which was funded by Eli Lilly, were published online October 28 in The

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Antibody drug tested in Cook County may be helpful to some COVID-19 patients, results show

A new antibody-based drug shows promise in treating outpatients who have mild to severe COVID-19, according to initial results of research conducted in part at Cook County Health and Northwestern University.

Patients given the drug were hospitalized or visited the emergency room less often than those given a placebo, Cook County Health officials said. The patients receiving the drug also showed improvement within two to six days, a shorter disease course that is not only good for patients but also may reduce the amount of time a person is infectious, helping protect other people.

The drug, manufactured by Eli Lilly and AbCellera Biologics Inc., was tested on 452 outpatients at 24 medical institutions across the country, including Cook County’s vast public health system and the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. Most of the 14 patients who took part at Cook County Health were Latino or Black, populations that have been hit especially hard by the disease.

The results of the continuing study, which is being run by Eli Lilly, were published Wednesday by the New England Journal of Medicine.

The drug, administered through a one-time infusion, includes the replicated antibodies of one of the first patients in the United States to survive COVID-19. It’s classified as a monoclonal antibody treatment, the same type of medication given to President Donald Trump after he was diagnosed with the disease and which he described as “a cure.”

The drug in the Eli Lilly trial was formulated using a single antibody. The drug Trump received was made by Regeneron and involves two antibodies.

Dr. Gregory Huhn, an infectious disease expert who led the arm of the Eli Lilly research conducted at Cook County Health, made it clear that the drug is a treatment, not a cure.

“Our hope has been that the antibody drug will reduce COVID symptoms quickly after diagnosis and help to eradicate the virus more quickly,” Huhn said. “While a vaccine is still necessary, this drug therapy has the potential to prevent bad clinical outcomes and complications of COVID-19.”

Scientists have surmised that monoclonal antibodies would be more effective earlier in the course of the disease, and that so far appears to be the case. Another recently released study found the Eli Lilly drug had no benefit for patients sick enough to be hospitalized — results that brought the research to a halt. Most of those patients also were treated with the antiviral drug remdesivir.

“There’s a more compelling argument to administer antibodies early on, before our own bodies generate their own immune response,” Huhn said.

The results released Wednesday found that 1.6% of outpatients given the Eli Lilly drug needed to be hospitalized or visit an emergency room, compared with 6.3% of patients who received a placebo. The drug worked by reducing the amount of virus in people’s bodies, the study determined.

The study’s findings also indicate better outcomes among high-risk patients — defined as patients 65 or older or morbidly obese patients who were at least

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Georgia infections show sharper rise if rapid tests included

ATLANTA (AP) — COVID-19 infections are rising more rapidly in Georgia, in line with a national trend of increasing cases.

The broadest measure of COVID-19 cases, which includes rapid antigen tests as well as the more precise genetic tests, shows the number of confirmed and probable cases was 18% higher in the week that ended Friday compared to the week before, according to a report issued Monday by the Georgia Department of Public Health.

The state recorded 10,086 genetic positives and 2,564 antigen positives last week, tipping Georgia back above 100 weekly cases per 100,000 people, one measure of rapid spread.


Georgia still remains far off its July peaks, when it was averaging 3,700 cases per day, worst in the nation at the time. Because the respiratory illness is now spreading so rapidly in other regions, Georgia ranks only 34th among the states, according to numbers tracked by The Associated Press. Many more cases, per capita, are being recorded in some Midwestern and Western states.

The share of positive genetic tests has risen above 7% statewide in Georgia from a low of 5.5% as late as Oct. 15, suggesting more rapid spread in communities. Experts say that if more than 5% of tests are coming back positive, it suggests that too few tests are being done and many infections may be going undetected.

Public Health Commissioner Kathleen Toomey said earlier this month that the state was planning to include positive rapid antigen tests in its daily report, but has not yet done so. Many other states count those tests no differently than genetic tests, but Georgia officials said they’re worried about the higher rate of false results on the antigen tests.

Despite those concerns, the state publishes antigen numbers in once-weekly county-level reports that are issued on Mondays.

But even just counting genetic tests, the rise in cases in Georgia is increasingly clear. The state’s seven-day daily average of positive tests is up 30% since hitting a low on Oct. 8, according to AP numbers. The seven-day average of hospitalizations is up 7% since hitting a low on Oct. 12.

Deaths, which usually lag behind hospitalizations, have mounted more slowly in recent days. Georgia has recorded 7,827 confirmed deaths from COVID-19 and more than 326,000 cases confirmed through genetic tests. While most people who contract the coronavirus recover after suffering only mild to moderate symptoms, it can be deadly for older patients and those with other health problems.

The numbers are rising as millions of Georgians cast their votes for president and federal and state offices. Democrats have heavily criticized President Donald Trump and Gov. Brian Kemp, both Republicans, for their actions during the pandemic. Kemp has said he’s striking the right balance between health and making sure restrictions don’t choke off economic growth.

Public health officials count 39 high transmission counties, with a group in northwest Georgia that includes the Carrollton, Cartersville, Rome and Dalton areas, parts of rural northeast Georgia north of Athens, and a belt running east

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Coronavirus in a Cough: Tests Show Masks Stopping the Spread | Health News

By Steven Reinberg, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) — A cough could spread a cloud of COVID-19 throughout a room, but a face mask can greatly shrink the size and spread of that cloud, a new study finds.

In fact, the volume of the cloud without a mask is about seven times larger than with a surgical mask and 23 times larger than with an N95 mask, the researchers found.

“We found that anything that reduces the distance traveled by the cloud, such as a mask, handkerchief, or coughing into an elbow, should greatly reduce the region over which the droplets disperse upon coughing, and therefore the chances of infection,” said researcher Rajneesh Bhardwaj, from the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, in Mumbai.

Using jet theory and data from the literature, Bhardwaj and colleague Amit Agrawal found the first 5 to 8 seconds after coughing is critical for suspending droplets in the air and the spread of the disease. After that, the cough cloud starts to break up.

The study findings helped the researchers develop a formula to determine the maximum number of people that can be in a hospital ward, and the rate at which air in a room, elevator, movie theater, car, plane cabin or restaurant needs to be circulated to keep the air fresh and reduce the odds of infection.

The report was published online Oct. 20 in the journal Physics of Fluids.

“We estimate this volume of the air, which may help to design ventilation of closed spaces and consequently reduce the spread of the disease,” Agrawal said in a news release from the American Institute of Physics.

Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Study: HIV-positive adults show early signs of aging, even after antiretroviral therapy

Oct. 22 (UPI) — People with HIV may experience aging-related illnesses, such as heart disease and brain disorders, earlier than those without the virus, even if they have been on antiretroviral therapy, a study published Thursday by the journal Pathogens and Immunity found.

The analysis, which compared 15 HIV-positive adults on antiretroviral therapy to 15 age-matched people without the virus, found that those being treated with the drugs showed increased evidence of cellular aging, the researchers said.

Antiretroviral therapies, or ART, are intended to slow the progression of HIV and reduce the level of the virus in the body.

While ART has led to people with HIV living longer, they are still at higher risk for having a “reduced healthspan” — or developing age-related health complications — than those without the virus, according to the researchers.

“Most individuals living with HIV probably already know that they are facing more health challenges than their uninfected peers, so the main takeaway from this study is that we’re now beginning to better understand why that is,” study co-author Beth D. Jamieson told UPI.

“It’s clear that the antiretroviral therapies aren’t causing this aging acceleration. It appears to be the virus and … the antiretroviral therapies appear to help reverse some of this aging, but the changes are less robust and much slower than we’d like to see,” said Jamieson, a professor of medicine in the division of hematology and oncology at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine.

About 1.4 million adults in the United States have HIV, and nearly 40,000 are diagnosed with the virus each year, according to the Department of Health and Human Services.

Research suggests that ART drugs bolster the immune systems of those with the disease, allowing them to better fight off infections and, effectively, enabling them to live close-to-normal lifespans.

However, treated HIV-infected adults still experience earlier declines in physical functions, as well as higher rates of heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, kidney failure, liver cancer and neurological disorders than otherwise healthy adults, Jamieson and her colleagues said.

For their research, the UCLA-based team assessed 30 study participants — 15 receiving ART for HIV and 15 healthy controls — for signs of cellular aging. DNA samples collected from all study subjects were analyzed using the epigenetic clock, a biochemical test used to measure aging.

In the HIV-positive participants, DNA samples were collected at three points — six months to one year before starting ART, six to 12 months after beginning treatment and 18 to 24 months later.

Before starting ART, the DNA participants with HIV all had significantly higher levels of four measures for cellular aging — age acceleration residual, extrinsic epigenetic age acceleration, phenotypic epigenetic age acceleration and Grim epigenetic age acceleration — than the uninfected adults, the researchers said.

That remained true six to 12 months after the HIV-positive participants started ART. However, 18 to 24 months after starting therapy, only levels of residual and extrinsic epigenetic age acceleration remained higher in those with HIV, the analysis

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