Prince William reportedly kept his coronavirus diagnosis a secret for this reason, royal expert claims

EXCLUSIVE: There’s a reason why Prince William may have kept his coronavirus diagnosis a secret from the world.

On Monday, The Sun reported the 38-year-old royal “struggled to breathe” while he battled the novel virus back in April during the early days of the global pandemic. The U.K.-based outlet reported the Duke of Cambridge didn’t speak out about the illness to avoid alarming the public.

“Here in Britain, there is controversy over the fact that we now discovered that he had COVID-19 back at the beginning of the first spike and he concealed it,” royal author Robert Lacey told Fox News. “At the time, the prime minister had coronavirus, his father had coronavirus.”

Lacey, who serves as a historical consultant to the hit Netflix series “The Crown,” recently released a new book titled “Battle of Brothers: William and Harry – The Inside Story of a Family in Tumult,” which examines the relationship and alleged feud between Princess Diana’s two sons.

PRINCE WILLIAM FOUGHT OFF CORONAVIRUS IN APRIL: REPORT

Britain's Prince William was reportedly diagnosed with coronavirus in April.

Britain’s Prince William was reportedly diagnosed with coronavirus in April.
(Photo by Tim Rooke/Pool/Samir Hussein/WireImage/Getty)

Lacey, who has been writing about the British royal family for 40 years and previously worked at the royal archives, spoke to numerous palace insiders for his latest release.

“[William] decided the world didn’t need him to be the third high-profiled coronavirus victim,” Lacey explained. “He followed all the rules. He did the quarantine, the self-isolating. He did Zoom, even while he was ill, and then got back to work.”

William reportedly tested positive only days after his father, Prince Charles, also tested positive for COVID-19 in late March.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson also contracted the virus around the same time. It is currently unclear if any other royals contracted the virus. It is believed William was treated by palace doctors and isolated in his Norfolk family home, Anmer Hall.

QUEEN ELIZABETH STEPS OUT WITH PRINCE WILLIAM FOR FIRST PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT SINCE MARCH

Prince William's father Prince Charles (pictured) was diagnosed with coronavirus in late March.

Prince William’s father Prince Charles (pictured) was diagnosed with coronavirus in late March.
(Getty)

A source told the outlet that the Duke of Cambridge, who is second in line to the throne, “was hit pretty hard by the virus.”

“At one stage he was struggling to breathe, so obviously everyone around him was pretty panicked,” they added. “After seeing medics and testing positive — which was obviously quite a shock given how fit and healthy he is — William was determined it should be business as usual though.”

After April 9, the royal took a weeklong break from phone calls and engagements before virtually opening the Nightingale Hospital Birmingham on April 16.

“People have said this is not right for an heir to the throne to keep this sort of thing a secret,” said Lacey. “He should be open. He’s hiding things from us. I, myself, in this case, do not agree with that criticism. It’s not unconstitutional to choose to be ill in private. He doesn’t have to share his pains and tribulations

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He got a coronavirus vaccine in China, but had to keep it secret. Why?

The oil company worker wondered why he had to keep his vaccination a secret. Questions raced through his head as he read the confidentiality agreement, which threatened he would be disciplined if he told anyone outside company management about the COVID-19 shot he was waiting to get.



a man wearing a hat: An employee inspects syringes of the coronavirus vaccine produced by Sinovac at its factory in Beijing. (Ng Han Guan / Associated Press)


© (Ng Han Guan / Associated Press)
An employee inspects syringes of the coronavirus vaccine produced by Sinovac at its factory in Beijing. (Ng Han Guan / Associated Press)

What if something went wrong? Who would take responsibility? The worker knew the vaccine maker, China National Biotec Group — part of the state-owned pharmaceutical group Sinopharm — was conducting trials of this vaccine on hundreds of thousands of volunteers in the United Arab Emirates, Peru, Morocco and other countries.

“At least they’re in a monitored, controlled situation,” he said of those trials, watching as hundreds of his co-workers lined up around him to get their injection at a clinic in Beijing. “But for us, they can’t make any guarantees. This is us making a sacrifice for the nation.”

The employee — who did not give his name for fear of reprisal — is one of hundreds of thousands of Chinese citizens who have received COVID-19 vaccines before they have been proved safe in clinical trials. China’s military began getting vaccinations in June. Medical workers and employees of state-owned companies working abroad were soon included in an “emergency use” program. In September, a China National Biotec executive said 350,000 people outside clinical trials had already received the vaccine.

Early vaccinations of high-profile people have become a way to show trust in China’s medical system after a 2018 scandal in which children were exposed to faulty vaccines for diphtheria and tetanus.

In March, images of Chen Wei, a military general and epidemiologist leading one of the coronavirus vaccine efforts, were widely shared by social media users, praising her for receiving an injection before it had been tested on animals. Yin Weidong, chief executive of biopharmaceutical company Sinovac, told reporters last month that he was one of the first to take the vaccine after it passed the first two trial phases. About 90% of Sinovac’s employees have voluntarily taken the vaccine early, the company said.

This month, China National Biotec Group reportedly began offering free vaccines to Chinese students planning to go abroad, according to a company website that was later taken down. More than 93,000 people had signed up for the free vaccine, the website said. Students who had been vaccinated also spoke to local and foreign media about their experiences. But state media later reported that the free vaccine offer was “not real.”

Several cities in Zhejiang province have also reportedly begun offering vaccines made by Sinovac. In Yiwu city, Chinese media found a clinic offering vaccination shots for about $30 each on a “first come, first served” basis. Most of those receiving shots were people planning international travel, though they did not have to prove it, according to local reports.



A technician works in a lab at Sinovac Biotech in Beijing on Sept. 24, 2020. The lab is working on a potential coronavirus vaccine. (Kevin Frayer / Getty Images)


© (Kevin

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