Daylight Savings health, weigh loss advice from Stephanie Mansour

CHICAGO (WLS) — After shifting the clocks back one hour, this first week of November can be a week of low energy.

Health and fitness expert Stephanie Mansour discussed the impact that just a one hour time can have on our body’s rhythm.

Even though many people have experienced weight gain with gyms being closed and more opportunities for potential stress-snacking, weight loss is still possible leading up to the holidays.

It’s possible to lose one to two pounds a week by making a few healthy changes in fitness and diet, Mansour said.

RELATED: Fitness expert Stephanie Mansour offers tips on how to stay positive during COVID-19 pandemic

Mansour recommended incorporating workouts into your daily routine- and it can be simple!

Don’t forget to set a date to recalibrate as well, Mansour said.

More tips to maintain a healthy lifestyle are available on Mansour’s website.

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MA Daylight Savings Bill Languishes As Clocks Fall Back

MASSACHUSETTS — Daylight savings time ends at 2 a.m. Sunday, meaning it’s time for the annual ritual of griping about shorter days and watching the sun set before the workday is over.

It’s also prime time to check in on a bill introduced in the Massachusetts legislature in January 2019 that, if passed, would keep Massachusetts permanently in daylight savings time. Co-sponsored by Senator John F. Keenan of Quincy and one of his constituents, Tom Emswiler, the bill would technically move Massachusetts out of the Eastern Time Zone and into the Atlantic Time Zone.

The bill has stalled, in part because the legislature has focused on the coronavirus pandemic this year. But Emswiler thinks the pandemic is reason to reconsider the bill, not an excuse to put it off.

“What better time to consider: Does it really make sense to arbitrarily shift our clocks for four short months?” Emswiler told Boston magazine earlier this month. “We’re already redesigning everything from work and school to weddings and Halloween. Why not commit now to stay on summer time?”

The proposal, which Emswiler has been championing for at least six years, isn’t just about having a little more daylight in the afternoons. Studies show workplace injuries, car crashes, pedestrian fatalities and heart attacks increase immediately when clocks “spring ahead” in March. There’s also a correlation between increased reports of Seasonal Affective Disorder and pushing the clocks back each fall.

About 5 percent of U.S. adults experience SAD each year, but experts worry those numbers will be higher this year with the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Social interactions, which can offset the depression that accompanies SAD, are harder to coordinate in the year of social distancing. Add in the stress of trying to work from home, coordinate remote learning, a second wave of coronavirus infections and a chaotic presidential election, and the stress that fuels depression multiplies.

“All of these things that can actually improve our mood are all things that because of the quarantine, we can’t do at all, and having this extra added layer of shifting our clocks back so at 4:00 p.m. it’s dark in the winter makes it even harder to feel motivated to find something to do,” Dr. Eric Zhou, a clinical psychologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, told Boston. “So it’s these two elements that go hand-in-hand that might really make mood a major issue for individuals during this fall and winter.”

A commission that studied keeping Massachusetts on daylight savings time voted 9-1 in favor of it in 2017. But the commission said the switch would only work if other northeastern states made the change. Massachusetts is one of more than 30 states that has a bill pending to stay on daylight savings time.

For this year, however, Massachusetts residents will have to deal with dark afternoons, heading up to Dec. 3-12, when the sun will set at 4:11 p.m. in Boston. The days will continue to get shorter after that, with later sunrises, until the winter

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Pensioner ‘butchered’ by dentist after spending life savings trying to her fix smile

A pensioner who was “butchered” by a Hungarian dentist after spending her life savings on trying to fix her smile has received a five-figure payout.

Jackie Stokes was left in crippling agony as a result of botched dental work in Budapest after she forked out £9,500 for teeth implants.

The 70-year-old had an implant in her upper jaw and crowns on eight teeth after her dentist of 30 years went private and she was unable to afford the fees.

But the procedures went catastrophically wrong, leaving her with blisters, stitches that fell out and shifting implants that left her with an unsightly “bulldog bite.”

Jackie, of Burton-upon-Trents, Staffs, instructed medical negligence lawyers to investigate her case after she was left with “irreversible damage” to her teeth.

She took two trips out to Hungary
She took two trips out to Hungary

The insurance company for two dentists involved in her care in Hungary have now agreed to pay a five-figure settlement, despite initially denying liability.

Jackie said: “I wouldn’t wish what I’ve faced on anyone and would urge people to not just assume everything is as it seems when they arrange such treatment.

“Proper research is vital, as it will ensure you are able to make an informed decision about how to proceed with any treatment.

“No one should have to go through what I have.”

Jakie urged people to do proper research before getting dental treatment
Jakie urged people to do proper research before getting dental treatment

Jackie said she felt “robbed” of her life savings after a dentist advised her to have the work done abroad as it would be cheaper.

She said: “It’s left me feeling as if I have been butchered, physically assaulted and robbed of my life savings.

“It’s been a nightmare. This entire episode is indelibly etched upon my brain. It’s ruined my life.”

Widow Jackie was first advised by a dentist to have implants fitted in 2012 after a dentist told her gum disease had gone undetected for a number of years.

Jackie after her first trip to the central European country
Jackie after her first trip to the central European country

After speaking with a friend who had undergone similar treatment, she was eventually put in touch with a UK-based company which arranged for dental treatment abroad.

Following an assessment, it was determined that she would need five teeth removed, with five implants being fitted and crowns being added to eight others.

She was also informed the treatment would take place in the UK as well as during two trips to Budapest.

However, Jackie went on to suffer a range of issues during the treatment between 2012 and 2015, including severe pain and discomfort.

Jackie in August 2013 after both trips to Hungary for treatment

She became concerned when her front jaw was protruding, leaving a gap between her gums and upper teeth through which food would seep.

She also said implants placed under her nose went into the nasal cavity and left her in agony.

The implants failed and were

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Health Savings Accounts and Chiropractic Care

The healthcare industry in the United States is dominated by the culture of conventional Western medicine. And health insurance caters to those who control the industry: medical doctors and hospitals. There is a long history of prejudice against chiropractic by medical doctors, which is one reason that chiropractic care is not often covered by health insurance.

Many research studies have shown that chiropractic care is beneficial and that it is more cost effective in the treatment of low back pain and other common musculoskeletal conditions than traditional Western medicine is. Chiropractic also lowers health care costs by focusing on prevention, was well as on treatment.

It is surprising that health insurers choose not to cover treatment that is as beneficial and cost effective as chiropractic care is. Studies have continually shown that individuals who seek the care of a chiropractor on a regular basis are healthier and, generally, spend less on health care than those who do not.

Chiropractic Care and Consumers

What is not surprising is that consumers are wise enough to see the advantages of chiropractic care. Many people prefer to see a chiropractor simply because they see tangible benefits from the care they receive. Many others are disillusioned with traditional Western medicine and the healthcare system, and they look for alternatives such as chiropractic care.

It is clear, both from patient testimonies and from clinical research that consumers benefit from chiropractic care. Unfortunately, they may have difficulty affording chiropractic care because it's often excluded from healthcare insurance policies.

Health Savings Accounts can help consumers afford chiropractic care, even when it is excluded from their health insurance policy. They can pay for chiropractic care and other alternative medicine with pre-tax dollars by using a Health Savings Account.

Many chiropractors keep their costs as low as possible in order to make chiropractic care more available to consumers. They can, however, only absorb so much of the cost of providing that care. Another way chiropractors can help clients gain access to chiropractic care is to encourage the use of Health Savings Accounts.

Health Savings Accounts and Consumer Choice

The combination of a Health Savings Account and a High Deductible Health Insurance plan is supposed to encourage individuals to become thoughtful, wise consumers of health care. The individual is spending more of his or her own dollars on healthcare, so she will be more concerned about how those dollars are spent.

Health Savings Accounts give consumers more choice in how their healthcare dollars are spent. Money in the HSA must be spent on approved medical expenses, but there are really very few restrictions on what kind of healthcare you choose. More and more chiropractic patients are discovering that having an HSA is saving them money on their medical expenses.

Traditional health insurance has gatekeepers and controls. Even when chiropractic care is covered (not typical on individual plans), the individual requesting chiropractic care may be required to go see their family physician (or gatekeeper) and get a referral. Not all medical doctors …

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