Dentist who mowed down woman held for hit and run in Delhi

New Delhi, Dec 1 (IANS) A 42-year-old Delhi-based dentist has been arrested for a hit and run case in south Delhi in which a young woman was mowed down by the dentist’s speeding car in Lado Sarai, the police said on Tuesday.

According to the police, a PCR call regarding an accident at Lado Sarai red light was received at the Saket police station on November 17. A team of Delhi Police reached the spot and found that a woman was hit by a car and was injured. The woman was immediately shifted to AIIMS where she was declared brought dead. The car driver fled from the spot in the said car.

The police team collected footages of the CCTV cameras installed in and around the place of the accident. The footages were scanned thoroughly and the police team succeeded in gathering some information about the alleged car. The police got the details of the owner of the car and reached the address but the alleged driver was not found there.

“The team started gathering information about the whereabouts of the accused person. With consistent efforts, the location of the accused person was zeroed down in Kalkaji Extension. The team conducted a raid and arrested the accused who was identified as 42-year-old dentist Pankaj Sudhakar. He confessed to the crime and the offending car was seized,” said Atul Thakur, DCP, South Delhi.

–IANS

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Jack Wilshere keeps up fitness on a run near his London home as free agent considers a move to MLS

Hit the road, Jack! Wilshere keeps up his fitness on a run near his London home as the free agent considers a move to MLS after his West Ham contract was ripped up

  • Jack Wilshere is keeping up his fitness after being released by West Ham 
  • The midfielder is looking for a new club after agreeing to terminate his contract
  • The former Arsenal and England man has been linked with a move to the MLS 

Jack Wilshere is determined to keep up his fitness as he bids to get back into professional football following the termination of his West Ham contract.

The midfielder was putting in the hard yards during a run near his London home as he considers his options after agreeing to end his two-year association with the Hammers. 

The former Arsenal and England man has had interest at home and abroad but is said to be weighing up a move to the MLS.

Jack Wilshere is keeping up his fitness after agreeing to cancel his West Ham contract

Jack Wilshere is keeping up his fitness after agreeing to cancel his West Ham contract

The midfielder was seen running near his London home as he considers his options

Wilshere is desperate to get his career back on track after a spate of injury problems which have stopped him reaching his potential.

Sportsmail revealed last month that West Ham had been planning to get the midfielder’s £100,000-a-week salary off the wage bill with his contract set to end in in the summer of 2021.

The club had been hoping to find a buyer but with no takers they agreed to pay the remaining £3.9million that was left on his deal. 

The 28-year-old claims to have been fit for the last eight months of his West Ham career

The 28-year-old claims to have been fit for the last eight months of his West Ham career

Wilshere has been linked with a move to the MLS as he looks to get his career back on track

Wilshere has been linked with a move to the MLS as he looks to get his career back on track

After leaving the club on transfer deadline day, Wilshere issued a statement claiming he had been fit for the last eight months. 

He said: ‘When I joined the club in the summer of 2018 I joined with great hopes and was excited to join the club I supported as a boy. 

‘Despite all of my best efforts and intentions, it has not worked out as I’d expected.

‘I have been fully fit for a large period of time at the club, including over the course of the last eight months but unfortunately have not been given the opportunity to play.

He looked to have a promising future ahead of him after making his Arsenal debut at 16

He looked to have a promising future ahead of him after making his Arsenal debut at 16

‘Although I am frustrated I was not able to fully showcase what I am capable of at West Ham, I remain convinced that I can still contribute at the very top of the game.

‘I am still hungry and ambitious.’

The 28-year-old was tipped to have a big future when he became Arsenal’s youngest ever debutant before going on to make his

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‘Pretty awful.’ Two Bay Area counties halt COVID-19 test program run by Google offshoot

A person displays their documentation behind the rolled up car window, to enter the Verily coronavirus free drive-up testing site at Cal Expo in Sacramento, Calif., Friday, March 27, 2020. Area residents who are 18 or older and experiencing mild to moderate symptoms can apply online for Project Baseline's COVID-19 screening in-person testing. The program has been operating in the San Francisco Bay Area before expanding to Sacramento. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
A person displays documentation to enter a Verily coronavirus free drive-up testing site at Cal Expo in Sacramento in March. (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)

Amid fanfare in March, California officials celebrated the launch of a multimillion-dollar contract with Verily — Google’s health-focused sister company — that they said would vastly expand coronavirus testing among the state’s impoverished and underserved communities.

But seven months later, San Francisco and Alameda counties — two of the state’s most populous — have severed ties with the company’s testing sites amid concerns about patients’ data privacy and complaints that funding intended to boost testing in low-income Black and Latino neighborhoods instead was benefiting higher-income residents in other communities.

San Francisco and Alameda are among at least 28 counties, including Los Angeles, where California has paid Verily to boost testing capacity through contracts collectively worth $55 million, according to a spokesperson for the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services. About half have received coronavirus tests through six mobile units that travel among rural areas.

Gov. Gavin Newsom has heralded the investment as a game-changer in addressing persistent inequities in access to testing across the state that tend to fall along lines of ethnicity and income. The goal, he said in April, touting six new Verily testing sites, was to “make sure we’re truly testing California broadly defined, not just parts of California and those that somehow have the privilege of getting ahead of the line.”

Yet the roadblocks for getting underrepresented populations to use the program soon became apparent to Alameda County officials. In a June letter to California Secretary of Health Mark Ghaly, Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf and other members of the county’s COVID-19 Racial Disparities Task Force raised numerous concerns about the Verily protocols.

Among their complaints: People signing up for a test through Verily had to do so online, using an existing or newly created Gmail account; the sign-ups were offered only in English or Spanish; and participants were asked to provide sensitive personal information, including their home address and whether they were managing chronic health conditions such as diabetes, obesity or congestive heart failure, which could expose their data to third-party use.

“It is critical in this crisis that we continue to build trust between government and healthcare providers and vulnerable communities,” the task force members wrote.

Verily had two sites in Alameda County, and one was shuttered by May. The second, located at an Oakland church, closed in August and is set to reopen using a different testing vendor. Alameda County testing director Dr. Jocelyn Freeman Garrick said that while the Verily sites helped the county reach testing goals in terms of raw numbers, they were phased out because of long wait times of a week or more for results, and because the tests were not reaching the residents in greatest need.

Verily does not manufacture the tests used at its California sites. It contracts with major corporations such as Quest Diagnostics and Thermo Fisher Scientific to provide

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Driven to run- The New Indian Express

Express News Service

MYSURU: While cycling on holidays with friends is a joyous pastime, this 49-year-old dentist from Mysuru is riding the sports track for the ‘long run’. Dr Usha Hegde is one passionate athlete whose love for sports simply proves age is just a number.

Originally from Bengaluru, Dr Usha moved to Mysuru. She underwent her first serious athletic long-distance training in 1987 at the Kanteerava Stadium in Bengaluru. Over time, she learnt to cycle, swim, run and trek, and has participated in several events – endurance running, duathlon (cycle and run), triathlon (swim, cycle and run), winning medals and accolades.

Running the 10K and half-marathons for 10 years made her take on the more exhilarating full marathon – a gruelling race covering 42.2 km. She started cycling through Mysuru-Ooty, Mysuru-Goa, and Manali-Leh. Her race to the triathlon track has been gradual. “Triathlon is very challenging because it involves swimming, cycling and running in one race. Even if one manages all the three, doing it as a single sport, back-to-back needs a lot of physical adaptations and a tough mental makeup. But with proper training, it is not impossible,” she says.

Speaking about the prospects, she adds, “Triathlon is an expensive sport, not just participating in an Ironman event, but also training for it since we need to possess a lot of things. For elite triathletes, there are sponsors, but generally, it is self-funded. However, the sport is picking up in India now.” She says, “After training hard, participating in an Ironman event is like an icing on the cake.” Dr Usha has some advice for budding triathletes. She feels that one needs to understand the different aspects of the sport, train sensibly with a proper regimen.

And how does a dentist balance her profession and passion for sport? “It’s just a matter of prioritising our passions and work and managing time appropriately,” says Dr Usha. “I wake up at 4 am and start practice by 4.30 am. I neither watch a lot of TV nor go out much. My fitness time ranges from 7 hours a week to about 16 hours, based on the event and training plan,” she says. Dr Usha follows a balanced diet, eating three proper meals and two small bites in between. She has avoided junk food since childhood. Dr Usha is married to orthopaedist Dr Ajay Hegde and is the mother of two children.

Besides being a good sportswoman, she has been strong in academics as well. She was the university first rank-holder in graduation and bagged three gold medals too. A word of motivation for women who wish to power the race track. Says Dr Usha: “The sheer role of women makes it difficult for them to prioritise health over others at home. But we women should make time for ourselves, and not give up on our passions.”

What is Ironman Triathlon?
Ironman Triathlon is a one-day long-distance triathlon race. It starts with a swim (3.86 km in sea/river); followed by 180

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3 tips that helped this man lose 155 pounds, run half-marathons

In 2018, Matthew Morgan made a New Year’s resolution that sounded a lot like ones he made in the past: He vowed to lose weight. Then in February he had a minor heart attack. But instead of letting that derail his goals, it emphasized how he needed to stick with his healthy habits.

“I used it as motivation. I actually suffered a heart attack from having the extra weight,” the 41-year-old from Brunswick, Maryland told TODAY. “That was enough of a wake-up call that I needed to continue down the path that I was going rather than go back. Because the heart attack was the result of what I’ve pretty much done my whole life.”

Unhealthy eating habits and a sedentary lifestyle led Matthew Morgan to weigh 330 pounds. (Courtesy Matthew Morgan)
Unhealthy eating habits and a sedentary lifestyle led Matthew Morgan to weigh 330 pounds. (Courtesy Matthew Morgan)

A life of dieting

Morgan was overweight most of his life, but in high school and college he was in the marching band and that activity kept his weight a little bit lower.

“I’ve so-called dieted pretty much my whole life,” he said. “After college because I wasn’t active and got stuck in a sedentary lifestyle — I wasn’t exercising — the weight just kept coming on.”

At his heaviest, he weighed 330 pounds and that’s when he knew he had to take his health seriously. He started by tracking what he ate on the weight-loss app, Lose It!

“I would use the app to track every single thing that went in my mouth to the extent of having a food scale and weighing every single piece of food,” Morgan explained. “I would use the recipe builder on a portion of the Lose It! app to enter in all the ingredients for stuff I was cooking so that I could get an accurate count.”

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He also started to move more, first walking.

“It was difficult because you’re going from a lifestyle where you’re really sitting on the couch, sitting at work, sitting at home — not really moving a whole lot — to trying to be as active as possible,” he said.

When Matthew Morgan was losing weight he ate foods, such as yogurt, almonds, fruits and vegetables. As he maintains his 155-pound loss, he still relies on these foods. (Courtesy Matthew Morgan)
When Matthew Morgan was losing weight he ate foods, such as yogurt, almonds, fruits and vegetables. As he maintains his 155-pound loss, he still relies on these foods. (Courtesy Matthew Morgan)

But then Morgan stared listening to podcasts about people using running to help with their weight loss and he wondered if he, too, could run.

“Being someone that was overweight my whole life I assumed that I would never ever be able to run,” Morgan said. “Running is actually something I do for entertainment. Now if I find I’m bored or have a stressful day — you name it — I go out for a run.”

He runs four to five times a week for an average of 20 miles. Since making his resolution, Morgan lost 155 pounds to weigh 175 pounds. He’s run several half-marathons, though they have all been virtual due to COVID-19. He’s looking forward to someday running a

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