Dioxane levels rise; Michigan Medicine further restricts visitors; Small Business Saturday in A2

Happy Friday!

I hope you had a nice Thanksgiving, even though it likely looked different this year. Today is Black Friday, and although it’s known for great deals to be had at big-box stores, a lesser-known day is Small Business Saturday. Now more than ever, local businesses need support — especially as the pandemic and cold weather restrict operations.

Need some ideas? Main Street Ann Arbor just released its annual shopping guide. Here’s another guide that highlights businesses that are women- and minority-owned. Meanwhile, this gift guide focuses on local food and drink producers. Sarah has also spent the past several months speaking with local business owners and highlighting them for her Small Business Saturday series. Don’t see your favorite business on the list? Submit it here.

Have a great long weekend.

– Meredith (@meredith_A4)

What’s been happening:

⛔️ Michigan Medicine announced this week that no visitors are allowed for adult patients as COVID-19 cases spike across the state. There are some exceptions to the new policy, which took effect on Wednesday. (A4)

🚰 Recent tests from water samples taken in October in the West Park area reveal a spike in Dioxane levels, concerning local officials. (MLive)

🚶‍♀️ The city of Ann Arbor celebrated the grand opening of the Allen Creek Railroad Berm Project this week virtually. (A4)

🚲 Have a look at the new downtown protected bikeway on First Street. (MLive)

🛤 The long-awaited passenger train service from Ann Arbor to Traverse City — known as A2TC — has put test rides slated for 2021 on hold due to the pandemic. (Detroit Free Press)

🎓 A senior at the University of Michigan became the school’s 29th Rhodes Scholar since the awards were established in 1902. (A4)

💻 Toyota and Cisco have partnered to install free Wi-Fi at public sites in the region, including in Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti. (A4)

Good to know:

🌯 Vegan Kerrytown joint Detroit Street Filling Station expanded into the space next door. The owner said it could become a private dining space or intimate music venue. (A4)

🍪 Have kids ages 8 and up? Love holiday cookies? This local cooking school for kids will be hosting holiday cookie classes online for the whole family. (A4)

🎅 Santa’s Mailbox will return to Main St. this year. From Nov. 28-Dec. 14, write a letter to Santa with a return address and you will receive a response. (A4)

🤝 Tuesday is Giving Tuesday. The annual Rockin’ for the Hungry fund drive by Food Gatherers, ann arbor’s 107one and Kroger will kick off virtually on Tuesday, as will Ann Arbor Summer Festival’s campaign which will feature free performances by Michigan-based artists throughout the day. (A4)

Feature interview of the week:

“We had to pivot to something that is ironic for us, because the whole gist of Literati is that it is a community bookstore that

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Traditional Chinese Medicine Market is Driven by Rise in Popularity among Major Population from all Across the World

Global Traditional Chinese Medicine Market: Snapshot

In recent period, the major population from all across the world is inclined toward the use of traditional Chinese medicines. As a result, the traditional Chinese medicine market is experiencing notable expansion opportunities.

The traditional Chinese medicines are found to be helpful in protecting an individual’s cognitive health, maintaining their strength as well as flexibility. As a result, they are gaining popularity among major population from all across the world. This factor will drive the growth of the traditional Chinese medicine market in the years to come.

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TMR’s upcoming research report on the traditional Chinese medicine market focuses on providing in-depth study of diverse important factors shaping the future of this market. It includes study of challenges, drivers, restraints, and opportunities in the market for traditional Chinese medicine. Apart from this, the report delivers dependable data on shares, volume, and revenues of the market for traditional Chinese medicine. Thus, the report is a valuable handbook for all entities working in the traditional Chinese medicine market during the forecast period of 2020 to 2030.

The global traditional Chinese medicine market is segmented on the basis of various key factors such as product type, application, and region. Based on product type, the market for traditional Chinese medicine is bifurcated into Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture and Tai Chi.

Global Traditional Chinese Medicine Market: Growth Dynamics

The traditional Chinese medicine market is witnessing prominent growth avenues on the back of increased acceptance from various developed and developing countries. The world is witnessing noteworthy growth in the number of older populace. This factor is pushing the market growth. This aside, the improved disposable income of major people in the world is expected to drive the growth of the traditional Chinese medicine market.

Growing urbanization, technological advancements in healthcare sector, and presence of favorable health insurance policies are some of the key factors stimulating the growth opportunities in the traditional Chinese medicine market. This aside, presence of favorable government policies will support the growth of the market for traditional Chinese medicine in the years ahead.

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Global Traditional Chinese Medicine Market: Notable Development and Competitive Analysis

The traditional Chinese medicine market witnesses presence of gamut of players. As a result, the competitive landscape of the market for traditional Chinese medicine is highly intense. To sustain in this scenario, gamut of vendors working in this market are executing diverse strategies. Many players are growing their expenditure on research and development activities. This aside, many vendors are engaged in the launch of new products. All these activities connote that the traditional Chinese medicine market will experience remarkable growth in the upcoming years.

The list of key players in the traditional Chinese medicine market includes:

  • Apicare Pain Clinic
  • Tongrentang Hospital
  • Beijing Chinese Medicine Hospital
  • Dongzhimen Hospital
  • Beijing Hua Kang Hospital
  • Mayo Clinic
  • YinOvaCenter and WOTCM

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Michigan Medicine tightens visitor restrictions as hospitalizations continue to rise

ANN ARBOR, MI – No visitors will be allowed with adult patients in Michigan Medicine hospitals, except when medically necessary, as the health system tries to minimize COVID-19 spread.

Michigan Medicine announced the changes that will go into effect on Wednesday, Nov. 25. Information on exceptions, including end-of-life care, labor and delivery and other situations, can be found here.

“COVID-19 transmission rates continue to climb in the community. Our top priority is the safety of our patients and staff, and to minimize the spread of disease, we need to take this additional step,” said Laraine Washer, M.D., Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology, in a news release.

“We know this is difficult for our patients and their families and friends. But we need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients.”

The latest visitor limitations come in addition to restrictions the health system previously announced, including not allowing visitors with adult emergency department patients; a two-visitor limit for pediatric patients and mask requirement at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital; and no visitor rule for adult patients at Michigan Medicine clinics, unless the patient has a cognitive or physical impairment that requires assistance.

As of Nov. 23, Michigan Medicine reported 103 patients currently admitted that tested positive for COVID-19 – the highest number since late April.

Washer encouraged people to stay home this Thanksgiving and avoid gatherings with those outside your household.

“The best advice to limit risk is to continue to avoid gathering with people outside your household even if it is Thanksgiving. If you are reporting to work, don’t have potlucks or share meals in close proximity with your co-workers: you can’t eat without taking off your mask, and that brief period of not wearing a mask could be enough to open the door to disease spread,” Washer said.

READ MORE:

Wear masks, Michigan Medicine leaders tell public as hospitalizations surge

Michigan coronavirus outbreaks increase 45% in 2 weeks

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Cases of Covid-19 in children on rise in the US, with highest 1-week spike yet

Soaring case counts around the country are impacting children at “unprecedented levels,” according to new numbers released Monday by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children’s Hospital Association, which are tracking data reported by state health departments.



a police car parked in a parking lot: An attendant talks to a person waiting in their car at a coronavirus testing site October 31 in El Paso, Texas.


© Cengiz Yar/Getty Images
An attendant talks to a person waiting in their car at a coronavirus testing site October 31 in El Paso, Texas.

There were 61,000 new cases in children during the last week of October, “which is larger than any previous week in the pandemic,” the AAP said in a statement. From the onset of the pandemic through October 29, more than 853,000 children have tested positive for Covid-19, the AAP said, including nearly 200,000 new cases during the month of October.

“This is a stark reminder of the impact this pandemic is having on everyone — including our children and adolescents,” said AAP President Dr. Sally Goza in the statement.

“This virus is highly contagious, and as we see spikes in many communities, children are more likely to be infected, too,” Goza said.

Yet these numbers are likely an undercount, the AAP said. Because symptoms in children are often mild and can look like common colds or viruses, many children go untested.

Symptoms in children

Typical symptoms of Covid-19 in both children and adults include a fever of 100 degrees Fahrenheit or higher, a dry cough, difficulty breathing, headaches, digestive issues, body aches and fatigue, runny nose, sore throat and sneezing.

Unusual symptoms can include “Covid toes” — a reddish tinge to toes and other extremities, a sudden loss of taste and smell and conjunctivitis, a highly contagious condition also known as pink eye.

However, early research has suggested children may not get fever, cough or shortness of breath as often as adults. Fever and cough was found in 56% and 54% of children in one study, compared to 71% and 80% of adults, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Shortness of breath was found in only 13% of pediatric patients, compared to 43% of adults. Sore throat, headache, muscle pain, fatigue and diarrhea were also less commonly reported in children.

While cases of severe illness due to Covid-19 appears to be rare among children, severe illness has been reported, most often in infants less than a year.

When children did need to be hospitalized, the CDC found, one in three needed to be treated in the intensive care unit — the same rate as for adults.

Long-term effects not known

Adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17, according to an early October report by the CDC, were about twice as likely to test positive for Covid-19 than kids between 5 and 11 years old.

More severe cases of Covid-19 were most likely to be found in children with underlying health conditions, the CDC said, with chronic lung disease, including asthma, the most commonly reported condition (55%). While in smaller percentages, children with disability (9%), immune disorders (7%), diabetes (6%), psychological conditions

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As U.S. COVID-19 Cases Break Records, Weekly Deaths Rise 3% | Top News

(Reuters) – The number of new COVID-19 cases in the United States hit another record high last week, rising 18% to more than 575,000, while deaths inched up 3%, according to a Reuters analysis of state and county reports.

The number of new cases reported each week has risen for four straight weeks, with the biggest increases seen in the last two weeks.

Nationally, nearly 5,800 people died of the virus in the seven days ended Nov. 1, bringing the total to over 230,000. Health experts say deaths tend to increase four to six weeks after a surge in infections.

(Open https://tmsnrt.rs/2WTOZDR in an external browser for state-by-state details)

Thirty-four out of 50 states have seen new cases increase for at least two weeks in a row, down from 36 the prior week. They include Florida, Ohio and Michigan — all hotly contested states for Tuesday’s U.S. presidential election. New cases rose 60% in Pennsylvania, another crucial state.

Texas reported the most new cases last week with over 45,600, followed by Illinois, which has half as many people, with over 44,500 new cases.

The United States performed 8.5 million COVID-19 tests last week, of which 6.8% came back positive for the new virus, compared with 6.3% the prior week, according to data from The COVID Tracking Project, a volunteer-run effort to track the outbreak.

South Dakota led the nation with the highest positive test rate at 50%, followed by Iowa at 44% and Wyoming at 43%. A total of 17 states had a positive test rate of over 10%.

The World Health Organization considers rates above 5% concerning because it suggests there are more cases in the community that have not yet been uncovered.

(Writing by Lisa Shumaker; Graphic by Chris Canipe; Editing by Tiffany Wu)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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Rise in nighttime blood pressure increases heart disease risk, study finds

Nov. 2 (UPI) — People who have high blood pressure at night are at increased risk for heart disease, even if their blood pressure is within normal ranges during the day, according to a study published Monday by the journal Circulation.

A nighttime systolic blood pressure — the “top” number — that is 20 millimeters of mercury — or mm. Hg, the unit of measure for blood pressure — above daytime readings raises a person’s risk for heart disease by 18%, the data showed.

That same rise in nighttime blood pressure also increases a person’s risk for heart failure by 25%, the researchers said.

“Nighttime blood pressure is increasingly being recognized as a predictor of cardiovascular risk,” study co-author Dr. Kazuomi Kario said in a statement.

“This study provides much more in-depth information about the cardiovascular risk associated with high nighttime blood pressure,” said Kario, a professor of cardiovascular medicine at Jichi Medical University in Japan.

Nearly half of all adults in the United States — or 108 million people — have high blood pressure, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates.

Research suggests that up to 40% of people experience rises in systolic blood pressure at night, whether or not their blood pressure is considered normal or healthy — between 90 mm. Hg and 120 mm. Hg — during the day.

For this study, researchers measured daytime and nighttime systolic blood pressure in 6,359 adults from across Japan between 2009 and 2017, using an at-home, wearable, ambulatory monitor.

Blood pressure was recorded during daily activities and sleep for at least 24-hours at a time, and device data were periodically downloaded at a healthcare clinic, the researchers said.

Nearly half of the study participants were male, and more than half were aged 65 years and older, according to the researchers.

All of the study participants had at least one risk factor for heart disease — although none had been diagnosed with it — and 75% of them were taking blood pressure medications when the study began, the researchers said.

The study participants were instructed to rest or sleep during nighttime hours and maintain their usual daytime activities, and they recorded their daily activities and sleep and wake times in a diary.

Nearly every participant recorded 20 daytime and seven nighttime automated blood pressure measurements.

By the end of the study period, participants experienced a total of 306 cardiovascular events, including 119 strokes, 99 diagnoses of coronary artery disease and 88 diagnoses of heart failure.

Those with a disrupted circadian blood pressure rhythm — or higher blood pressure at night than during the day — had a 48% higher risk for heart disease and were nearly three times as likely to experience heart failure, the data showed.

Circadian rhythms are the body’s natural, internal process that regulates a person’s sleep-wake cycle and repeats with each rotation of the Earth, or roughly every 24 hours, according to the American Heart Association.

Blood pressure typically fluctuates with a pattern that follows the

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L.A. County reports 1,590 coronavirus cases, 4 deaths amid rise in Southern California infections

Los Angeles County public health officials on Sunday reported 1,590 new cases of the coronavirus and four related deaths.



a person sitting on a bed: A masked voter works on his ballot at Azusa Women's Club. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)


© Provided by The LA Times
A masked voter works on his ballot at Azusa Women’s Club. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)

The numbers brought the county’s total to 309,197 cases and 7,074 deaths.

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There were 799 confirmed coronavirus patients in county hospitals on Friday, with 28% in intensive care, officials said. Though hospitalizations have increased slightly, they remain far below the 2,220-plus patients seen during the peak of the outbreak in July.

Still, many Southern California communities are reporting increases in the number of cases recorded each day, a concerning trend that has some officials worried that transmission of the virus could be on the rise.

In order to determine when a county can move to the next phase of reopening under California’s four-tier plan, the state monitors how many cases have been reported per 100,000 residents over a recent seven-day period. In larger counties, the rate is adjusted to account for how much testing is being done.

L.A. County’s adjusted case rate increased last week to eight per 100,000 residents, from 7.6 the week before.

In Orange County, which reported 233 new coronavirus cases and one death Sunday, the case rate ticked up to 5.1 from 4.6 the week before. Riverside County reported its most recent adjusted case rate at 10.1, up from 9.1 the week before. And San Bernardino County reported an adjusted case rate of 11.9, up from 10.9.

L.A., Riverside and San Bernardino counties all remain in the purple tier, the most restrictive, meaning risk of transmission remains widespread, and most nonessential businesses are closed for indoor operations. To move into the next tier, red, a county must have an adjusted rate of no more than seven cases per 100,000 residents.

Orange County is classified within the red tier. In order to move into the less-restrictive orange tier, which means that the risk of transmission is considered moderate and some indoor business operations can resume with modifications, the county must reduce its adjusted case rate to four cases per 100,000 residents.

It’s not clear what is driving the increase in cases in Southern California. Some officials have blamed parties as likely contributors, particularly gatherings celebrating the recent Lakers and Dodgers wins.

The trend is also playing out elsewhere across the United States, which on Thursday broke the single-day record for the highest number of coronavirus cases, then did so again Friday.

This story originally appeared in Los Angeles Times.

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First, coronavirus infections increased. Then, hospitalizations. Now, deaths are on the rise.

Coronavirus infections soared this week to record levels, hospitalizations are up in almost every state, and now — predictably, but slowly — deaths are rising, too.



a building lit up at night: South Dakota is among states setting records for coronavirus cases in recent days. For rural facilities such as Avera St. Luke’s Hospital in Aberdeen, the pandemic presents particular challenges.


© Bing Guan/Reuters
South Dakota is among states setting records for coronavirus cases in recent days. For rural facilities such as Avera St. Luke’s Hospital in Aberdeen, the pandemic presents particular challenges.

The nation passed another milestone Friday with 9 million confirmed cases since the start of the pandemic, including more than 98,000 new cases, a daily record. More than 1,000 deaths in the United States from the novel coronavirus were reported each day Wednesday and Thursday, according to health data analyzed by The Washington Post, continuing an upward trend that began two weeks ago.

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All signs indicate that this isn’t a blip but rather a reflection of a massive surge in infections that, without a dramatic effort to reverse the trend, will drive up the death toll for weeks to come. At least 229,000 people in the United States have died of covid-19, the disease caused by the virus.

But the mortality numbers have become political fodder on the campaign trail. Depending on whom you listen to, the coronavirus just isn’t that deadly anymore. Or it’s killing people in droves.

The truth is that mortality rates have improved, but the accelerating spread of the virus is driving up the absolute numbers of deaths.

Doctors have reported better outcomes thanks to improved techniques for treating patients and the use of the steroid dexamethasone and the antiviral remdesivir. In a widely reported study, researchers at NYU Langone Health found that the death rate among more than 5,000 patients in the system’s three hospitals dropped from 25.6 percent in March to 7.6 percent in August.

Still, this remains a potentially deadly disease, and a large proportion of the population is still vulnerable to infection. With the number of infections hitting daily records, there is reason to expect that deaths will keeping rising until the spread of the virus is contained.

Deaths lag infections by many weeks. In hard-hit North Dakota, daily infections have doubled since the end of September, while the average number of deaths from covid-19 is up 50 percent. In Indiana, cases are up 150 percent in that time, and deaths are up 93 percent.

In Wisconsin, cases began spiking in early September, and deaths began to rise sharply at the end of the month. Of the 2,029 deaths there from the pandemic, more than half have occurred since Sept. 25.

President Trump and his son Donald Trump Jr. have in recent days said there has been an excessive focus on infections rather than deaths, which have not risen as quickly and remain lower than in the early days of the pandemic.



a man looking at the camera: President Trump has said there is too much attention trained on infections.


© Oliver Contreras for The Washington Post
President Trump has said there is too much attention trained on infections.

“Do you ever notice, they don’t use the word ‘death’? They use the word ‘cases,’ ” the president said Tuesday in

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Norwalk Returns To Phase 2 Reopening As Coronavirus Cases Rise

NORWALK, CT — Norwalk is reverting to Phase 2 reopening efforts, as the city grapples with a continued rise in coronavirus (COVID-19) cases, Mayor Harry Rilling announced Thursday. The rollback will take effect at noon on Nov. 1 to allow businesses to prepare.

The city was placed on red alert status last week by Gov. Ned Lamont and state health officials, due to Norwalk exceeding 15 new coronavirus cases per 100,000 people. The number of red alert communities in Connecticut now stands at 30, up from 19 last week, according to the state.

At that time, the city’s rate of infection was 18.9 new coronavirus cases per 100,000, but that number more than doubled to 40.5 and then to 48.9 per 100,000 between Oct. 18 and Oct. 24. Norwalk also reported its first coronavirus-related deaths this week, after more than three weeks without one.

To date, 151 Norwalk residents have died as a result of the virus.

This week, Rilling has been under quarantine due to exposure to a family member who tested positive for COVID-19. The mayor has tested negative twice since then.

As of Thursday, 54 new coronavirus cases were reported in Norwalk, bringing the city’s total to 2,984 since the pandemic began in March, according to health officials. No new deaths were reported.

The city was at Phase 3 reopening, which meant restaurants, personal services, gatherings and sporting events could operate at 75 percent capacity. On Nov. 1, that number rolls back to 50 percent.

Additionally, Phase 2 also calls for:

  • Private gatherings to drop from 100 people to 25 people indoors, and 150 people to 100 people outdoors

  • Religious gatherings to decrease from up to 200 people to a maximum of 100 people indoors

“This is a difficult decision, as I do not want to see our local businesses impacted, but my priority remains the health and safety of our residents,” Rilling said. “Our cases are rising, and I am deeply concerned. We are now seeing increased cases for those over 70 years of age, and we know this population is at higher risk of serious illness and death from this virus.”

The city will host another free, drive-thru coronavirus testing session on Saturday between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. in the parking lot at Norwalk Community College on Richards Avenue.

“We have ramped up testing to try to slow this virus down, but it continues to spread rapidly, as people are not following all public health guidelines,” Rilling said. “Residents must take this seriously. Please, stay home if you can, limit travel and errands whenever possible, and always wear a face covering in public.”

This article originally appeared on the Norwalk Patch

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Stamford Returning To Phase 2 Reopening As Coronavirus Cases Rise

STAMFORD, CT — Mayor David Martin announced Thursday the city will return to “phase 2” of reopening following an increase in cases of the coronavirus in the city and across the state.

According to the state health department’s COVID-19 data tracker, Stamford is now at 15.6 cases per 100,000, qualifying the city as a “red zone,” Martin said in a news release.

The city also recently received data from the Wastewater Early Detection Program indicating the highest levels of COVID-19 residue in Stamford’s wastewater since the program began in August, Martin said.

See also: High Virus Concentrations Found In Stamford, Bridgeport Sewage

“This is a difficult decision,” Martin said in a statement, “but every indicator we’re monitoring suggests we’re at the beginning of a second wave. Unfortunately, this means we must change our behavior immediately.”

Martin also emphasized the urgency of residents increasing their caution as the city transitions back to phase 2.

(To sign up for Stamford breaking news alerts and more, click here.)

“This second wave is no longer speculative or a possibility, it is happening right now,” Martin said. “There is no feasible way to get our community and economy close to normal if everyone is getting sick. I am reluctant to make this decision because I know how it will impact our businesses and community, but the city of Stamford must rollback to phase 2 as soon as possible.”

Similar to phase 3, residents are required to maintain 6 feet of distance from others, wash or sanitize their hands frequently and wear either a mask or a face covering that covers both their nose and mouth.

The following restrictions are also in place under phase 2:

A full list of restrictions during phase 2, including specific guidelines for various businesses and establishments, can be found on the city website.

According to Jennifer Calder, the city’s director of health, the best defense against this virus is to avoid getting infected and avoid activities that could lead to infection.

“Any interaction with individuals outside your household puts you at risk,” Calder said in a statement. “This is especially true now as we report more cases per day. While many residents are fatigued of health and safety guidelines, unfortunately the virus does not get fatigued and will continue to spread if we let it.”

Residents can monitor daily coronavirus cases by visiting the state health department’s COVID-19 data tracker.

This article originally appeared on the Stamford Patch

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