FITNESS FILES: Yoga classes go back online with latest round of restrictions

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As far as Schmidt knows, there has not been a single case of transmission from her studio, so the latest rounds of restrictions did come as somewhat of a surprise.

All team sports, fitness classes and training sessions have been prohibited. Prior to the latest restrictions, yoga studios were adhering to stringent health guidelines.

“We were not touching each other, the instructors weren’t going around and doing any hands-on, and they were wearing a mask the whole time,” Schmidt said. “They’re safe and people are social distanced. I can understand some points because of the sizing, we’re not outdoors, but I was surprised, because I think most members of the health community are taking it seriously, they don’t want to be shutdown.

“The members and the instructors running it are trying to be extra cautious, because the instructors want to keep their jobs and the members don’t want to lose this, so people have been really good about staying away if they have a scratchy throat or something and the members had been quite responsible.”

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On Twitter: @DerekVanDiest

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CSEP-CPT fitness and lifestyle consultant Deanna Harder offers health advice and a home workout of the week. This is for educational purposes only and a physician should always be consulted before beginning any fitness program.

Deanna Harder, is a CSEP (Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology) certified personal trainer in Edmonton.

This week, the Ask A Trainer question was submitted by Kara:

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Alberta fitness studios confused by COVID-19 restrictions on group classes, workouts

The Alberta government’s recent COVID-19 restrictions are impacting smaller fitness studios and many owners admit is a bit confusing.



Orange Theory Fitness ensures sanitization of all equipment.


© Jill Croteau/Global News
Orange Theory Fitness ensures sanitization of all equipment.

According to new health guidelines announced Tuesday, gyms all group classes aren’t allowed. Fitness studios, like Revive Lifestyle Fitness, can’t  do group training or semi-private training.  Owner Mike Du said they are only allowed to conduct one on ones, if a coach is involved.

Read more: The New Reality: The uncertain future of fitness studios

He says the problem is gyms can still have a group of members working out together, physically distanced. The trainer has to be kept outside the room. For Du, the logic doesn’t make sense.

“It’s hard for us to understand, part of it is about the coach pushing people in a way that’s high intensity and breathing hard,” Du said. “But there’s nothing stopping people from doing that if we put 12 people in there working out on their own.”

 

Guidelines don’t allow even a handful of participants to be led by a professional, even if it’s fewer numbers than a group without a trainer.

“As long as you have a group bigger than one you can’t have a coach present,” Du said.

These new rules are contradictory to the whole fitness model of some studios, ones that rely on the motivation of a trainer. Tricia McDonald owns Orangetheory Fitness in Airdrie.

“Typically we would have 24 people in here. But in this location we are capping it at 10 to 12 people per session,” McDonald said. “That means they are always physically distanced in the class. But there’s nobody coaching you into it anymore, so you have to essentially coach yourself.”

McDonald admits it is challenging but is grateful to be able to give clients the space to workout.

“To be able to pivot like this and stay open for them is so important to us right now,” McDonald said.

Orangetheory is preparing to launch a new platform called “Orangetheory Live” to adapt to the new guidelines.

“These will be coach inspired workouts you do in the safety of your own home,” McDonald said. “It’s not virtual, we are still connecting because the coach is there inspiring you, cheerleading you, correcting form and its much more than typical virtual workout.”

Video: Lethbridge fitness studio offers rent-a-bike program through COVID-19 restrictions

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Lethbridge fitness studio offers rent-a-bike program during COVID-19 restrictions



a person sitting in front of a mirror posing for the camera: Kelleen Tait follows along with a virtual spin class at UNITE YQL during Alberta's second wave of COVID-19.


© Global News
Kelleen Tait follows along with a virtual spin class at UNITE YQL during Alberta’s second wave of COVID-19.

Kelleen Tait relies on her weekly workout sessions to keep grounded and manage her stress.

“During the first lockdown, I didn’t know what to do.”

With new Alberta gym capacity restrictions in place, she’s found a way to keep moving: a rent-a-bike program and virtual spin classes from local studio UNITE YQL.

Read more: Alberta enacts 2nd COVID-19 state of public health emergency. Here’s what it means

“It’s way harder than I would work out on my own and it really keeps me going,” Tait said.

For her, it’s not just about getting a sweat in. She says it allows her to still feel connected with instructors and a community she loves.

“As we’re all kind of shutting our doors and going into a bit more of an isolation mode, being able to generate that community is such a wonderful thing to be a part of and to support,” Tait said. “Especially when it’s [a local business] and it’s right in our downtown core.”

Owner of UNITE YQL, Vanessa Bishop, said it’s been a lifeline for her business and the supportive community they’ve worked to build over the last few years.

“The virtual program has allowed us to keep moving even though our physical space is temporarily closed.”

Although the decision to rent out expensive equipment was difficult, Bishop says it’s brought the studio’s high-energy barre and spin classes directly into clients’ homes. 

“[We can keep] giving hollers and encouraging the riders, because that’s the whole experience with us… It’s a fun atmosphere.”

Read more: Some businesses feel singled out as Alberta brings in stricter COVID-19 measures

The Lethbridge YMCA will also be offering virtual classes for members starting next week.

“There’s going to be fitness classes, yoga classes, wellness classes and all sorts of other items that will serve our community the best possible,” YMCA of Lethbridge Interim General Manager Scott Boyd said.

“We realize that everyone is dealing with this in all different ways.”

Boyd said a new gym space is now open on the facility’s main floor for those looking to move around safely.

Read more: Lethbridge gyms consider what reopening could look like

Tait says she plans to continue riding out the pandemic while supporting local business.

“I’m actually moving and I keep motivated,” she said. “It’s been great from a mental health aspect.”

She encourages others who might be interested in upping their at-home workouts to give it a spin.

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Michigan Medicine tightens restrictions for visitors

Michigan Medicine announced Tuesday it has tightened visitor restrictions for adult patients to minimize the spread of COVID-19 as cases continue to rise.

Beginning Wednesday, there will be no visitors allowed with adult patients at Michigan Medicine hospitals, except for some exceptions. Those exceptions are for end-of-life care, labor ad delivery, and other detailed here.

The new policy go with the other restrictions that have already been announced, which include no visitors with adult emergency department patients, two visitors for pediatric patients, and no visitors for adult patients at clinics.

“COVID-19 transmission rates continue to climb in the community. Our top priority is the safety of our patients and staff, and to minimize the spread of disease, we need to take this additional step,” said Laraine Washer, M.D., Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology.

“We know this is difficult for our patients and their families and friends. But we need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients,” Washer said. “We need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients.”

Additional Coronavirus information and resources:

Click here for a page with resources including a COVID-19 overview from the CDC, details on cases in Michigan, a timeline of Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s orders since the outbreak, coronavirus’ impact on Southeast Michigan, and links to more information from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, the CDC and the WHO.

View a global coronavirus tracker with data from Johns Hopkins University.

See complete coverage on our Coronavirus Continuing Coverage page.

Visit our The Rebound Detroit, a place where we are working to help people impacted financially from the coronavirus. We have all the information on everything available to help you through this crisis and how to access it.

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Michigan Medicine tightens visitor restrictions as hospitalizations continue to rise

ANN ARBOR, MI – No visitors will be allowed with adult patients in Michigan Medicine hospitals, except when medically necessary, as the health system tries to minimize COVID-19 spread.

Michigan Medicine announced the changes that will go into effect on Wednesday, Nov. 25. Information on exceptions, including end-of-life care, labor and delivery and other situations, can be found here.

“COVID-19 transmission rates continue to climb in the community. Our top priority is the safety of our patients and staff, and to minimize the spread of disease, we need to take this additional step,” said Laraine Washer, M.D., Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology, in a news release.

“We know this is difficult for our patients and their families and friends. But we need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients.”

The latest visitor limitations come in addition to restrictions the health system previously announced, including not allowing visitors with adult emergency department patients; a two-visitor limit for pediatric patients and mask requirement at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital; and no visitor rule for adult patients at Michigan Medicine clinics, unless the patient has a cognitive or physical impairment that requires assistance.

As of Nov. 23, Michigan Medicine reported 103 patients currently admitted that tested positive for COVID-19 – the highest number since late April.

Washer encouraged people to stay home this Thanksgiving and avoid gatherings with those outside your household.

“The best advice to limit risk is to continue to avoid gathering with people outside your household even if it is Thanksgiving. If you are reporting to work, don’t have potlucks or share meals in close proximity with your co-workers: you can’t eat without taking off your mask, and that brief period of not wearing a mask could be enough to open the door to disease spread,” Washer said.

READ MORE:

Wear masks, Michigan Medicine leaders tell public as hospitalizations surge

Michigan coronavirus outbreaks increase 45% in 2 weeks

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Philadelphia Fitness Coalition protesting restrictions on city gyms amid coronavirus pandemic

More than two dozen gyms in Philadelphia are joining forces, demanding that the city allows them to reopen.

Philly Fitness Coalition is fighing the restrictions for gyms in the city

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They have created the Philadelphia Fitness Coalition and have gathered more than 1,500 signatures in opposition to the new restrictions.

As the number of covid-19 cases rises, the city required gyms to shut down indoor activities at the end of last week.

But gym owners say it is unfair because of the safety precautions they have put in place.

They plan to protest outside of City Hall on Tuesday.

Last week, the city’s top health official, Dr. Thomas Farley, defended the city’s decision to tighten restrictions, saying now is the riskiest time for the transmission of the virus.

“What was now safe is now dangerous with the change in the weather. Many businesses feel they put safety measures in place, sure they have, and I’m sure there’s no spread there and that’s true in many places. Remember, there are more people than ever with the virus,” said Farley.

City officials said dramatic action is needed to respond to an exponential growth in cases and hospitalizations.

On Thursday, health officials announced 765 additional confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Philadelphia. That brings the number of confirmed cases to 57,237.

The number of residents who have died from the virus in Philadelphia is 1,945.

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Grey Lodge Pub in Mayfair closing

The new round of COVID-19 regulations was the final straw for one Philadelphia restaurant. The Grey Lodge Pub in Mayfair is closing its doors for good after 70 years in business. The Lucky Cat Brewing Company, which is a standalone business inside the pub, will remain open.

Philadelphia museums knocked back down by new COVID-19 restrictions

The new restrictions put in place to tackle the surge of COVID-19 cases in Philadelphia are hitting museums in the area hard. After going through a five-month shutdown during the first wave, they are being shut down again, which in some cases, will cause hard economic pain and uncertainty for employees.

National Constitution Center temporarily closes to the public through January 1, 2021

In accordance with health guidelines from the City of Philadelphia in response to COVID-19, the National Constitution Center is temporarily closed to the public through January 1, 2021. The Center offers a range of free online programs and resources for learners of all ages. CLICK HERE to learn more.

Houses of worship in Philly vow to persevere amid new COVID restrictions

The new COVID-19 restrictions in Philadelphia will have a major impact on houses of worship, which for the time being can operate at only 5% capacity. While the Archdiocese of Philadelphia revises its guidance, some churches and synagogues in the city have a variety of innovative plans

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Silver Cross Puts New Visitor Restrictions In Place

NEW LENOX, IL — As coronavirus cases increase across the state, Silver Cross Hospital has updated its visitor policy. The hospital has seen increased COVID-related hospitalizations over the last few weeks, Director of Marketing and Community Relations Debra Robbins told Patch.

As of Monday morning, there are 75 total isolated patients at the hospital. 71 patients are positive for the coronavirus, while four are patients under investigation.

Robbins said one patient is on a ventilator.

“With the growing number of COVID cases in the region, to keep our patients and staff safe, we’ve also implemented visitor restrictions effective today, Nov. 2,” Robbins said.

The new changes are:

  • For emergency department, procedural care unit and obstetrics: 1 visitor is allowed, but it must be the same visitor throughout

  • Inpatients: No visitors allowed unless approved for special circumstances such as a pediatric patient, end-of-life situations, or patients with special needs.

  • Outpatients: No visitors allowed unless the patient needs additional support, such as a pediatric patient, or patients with special needs.

“Please remember to mask, wash your hands often, and practice social distancing,” Robbins said.

This article originally appeared on the New Lenox Patch

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Can I go to the dentist in lockdown? Here’s how new restrictions effect treatment

A fresh lockdown coming into force within days will have left many frantically cancelling appointments.

But a date with the dentist is a vital service – and many will be concerned they will lose their appointments as businesses are forced to shut down once again.

Dentists were closed to all but emergency appointments during the early stages of the first lockdown. 

But there will be different rules in place for the second national lockdown, which comes into force from Thursday, October 5, until at least Wednesday, December 2.

People will be allowed to leave their homes for medical appointments

Dentists will remain open during the fresh coronavirus lockdown that kicks in on Thursday, it has been confirmed.

They will remain open for appointments, including regular check-ups during England’s second major shut-down.

Businesses including non-essential shops will be forced to closed once again in the government’s latest bid to curb spread of Covid-19.

But the British Association of Private Dentistry assured dental practices were considered essential.

The association tweeted: “Despite an impending lockdown private practices will remain OPEN.

“It’s safe and essential to attend the dentist.

“We remain open to all, for both routine and emergency treatments. #DentalCare”.

One of the reasons people are permitted to leave their home is for “medical reasons, appointments or to escape injury”.


Boris Johnson urged people to continue to use the NHS for treatment during his speech on Saturday, in which he outlined the new rules.

He said: “So please – this is really important – unless your clinicians tell you otherwise, you should continue to use the NHS, get your scans, turn up for your appointments and pick up your treatments.

“If at all possible, we want you to continue to access these services, now and through the winter.

“Indeed it’s only by taking this action that we can protect the NHS for you.”

Under the new rules, people are allowed to leave the house for a limited number of reasons.

There will be no time limit on how long people can go out for exercise.

People can also go outdoors for recreation with their own household, or on their own with one person from another household.

People will not be allowed to meet in homes and gardens, except for with members of their household ‘bubble’.

People can also leave home to shop for food and essentials and to provide care for vulnerable people or volunteering work.

Overnight stays outside of the home will only be allowed for work purposes, the new rules state.

Click here for a list of reasons you are allowed to leave the house under the new coronavirus lockdown rules.

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At a top hospital, Catholic restrictions on women’s healthcare are growing worse

Back in 2014, then-California Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris imposed a strict condition on the affiliation between Hoag Memorial Hospital and St. Joseph Health System, a Catholic hospital group: For the most part, Hoag was to be exempt from Catholic church restrictions on women’s healthcare services.



a group of people standing next to a sign: Demonstrators protest the decision to end abortion services at Hoag Memorial Hospital in Newport Beach in 2013. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)


© (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
Demonstrators protest the decision to end abortion services at Hoag Memorial Hospital in Newport Beach in 2013. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

Doctors at Newport Beach-based Hoag say that condition has been flagrantly breached by Providence Health, the successor to St. Joseph — and the violations are proliferating.

Since 2015 and up to the present day, a managed health plan controlled by Providence has been refusing to pay for contraceptives prescribed by Hoag OB/GYNs for their patients.

We would like to be tops in women’s healthcare, but how can we be if there are certain things we will never be able to provide, based on our association with Providence?

Jeffrey Illeck, an OB/GYN at Hoag Memorial Hospital

The health maintenance organization, Heritage Healthcare, has cited the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services as grounds for refusing payment, even though the 2014 agreement under which Harris approved the affiliation explicitly states that Hoag would not be bound by the so-called ERDs then or “in the future.”

Frustration among Hoag OB/GYNs has been rising.

Several members of Hoag’s professional staff filed a confidential complaint with Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra’s office on Oct. 9.

The complaint asserts that “Providence has increasingly disallowed women’s health services when they involve any form of contraceptive care,” even when IUDs are prescribed for reasons other than birth control, such as heavy menstrual bleeding.

Providence also has refused to cover deliveries when they’re combined with sterilization procedures such as salpingectomies (the removal of one or both fallopian tubes), even though combining those procedures is the standard of care to avoid requiring a patient to undergo two rounds of anesthesia and recovery rather than one.

The complaint says that physicians’ staffs are spending many hours a day pursuing reimbursement claims for Heritage enrollees.

“We have seen IUD reimbursements, for example, pending for as long as two years, requiring multiple appeals and grievances on behalf of patients,” the complaint states. Billing staff “have never spent so much time trying to get reimbursements for IUDs. … In many cases, payment is never received.”

The Hoag doctors say that Providence established “an anonymous hotline for people to complain if they believed Hoag was committing so-called immoral procedures involving women’s reproductive health.” The hotline was connected to the Orange County bishop’s office, they say, adding: “We were never told of its existence.”

In sum, “Providence has established a history of broken trust in its relationship with us, with absolutely no end in sight,” says the complaint, which is not a public document but which I’ve reviewed.

Providence has refused to comment on any of these assertions.

Becerra has not responded to the complaint, even

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Are gyms closing in lockdown? What Covid restrictions mean for fitness centres, and when they could open again

A second national lockdown will come into force as of Thursday 5 November to curb the spread of coronavirus.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced the latest measures alongside chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance and chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty during a press conference at Downing Street on Saturday.

As with the first lockdown, everyone in England will be banned from leaving their home except for a list of specific circumstances including going to school, commuting to work if you cannot work at home, seeking medical care or buying essential supplies.

But will gyms close again? Here’s what the second lockdown means for fitness centres.

Are gyms closing again?

Gyms and fitness centres were one of the last businesses to reopen at the end of July, following the first lockdown in spring.

Sadly, under the latest lockdown rules, they are set to close again.

Gyms were among the last businesses to reopen following the first lockdown in spring (Photo: David Davies/PA)

Indoor and outdoor leisure facilities, including bowling alleys, swimming pools, golf courses and driving ranges, as well as dance studios, stables and riding centres, soft play facilities, climbing walls and climbing centres, archery and shooting ranges, water and theme parks will also have to shut their doors.

Pubs, bars, restaurants and non-essential retail will close and people will be told to stay at home unless they have a specific reason to leave.

How long are they going to stay closed for?

Ms Johnson said will last from Thursday 5 November until 2 December.

This means that gyms and all other sports facilities will remain closed for at least four weeks.

Although Cabinet minister Michael Gove on Sunday added that England’s national lockdown could last longer than four weeks, if the R rate is not successfully brought below 1.0 by the end of the proposed lockdown period.

Why are gyms closing?

The closures of gyms are part of the second lockdown measures to halt the spread of Covid-19 cases as fresh data showed the second wave could be deadlier than the first.

Mr Johnson performed the U-turn after Government scientists presented data which showed that without drastic action, the NHS was on track to run out of capacity by the first week of December – even if all elective procedures are cancelled and Nightingale hospitals are reactivated.

Individuals will still be allowed to exercise outdoors, either on their own, with one person from another household or with their support bubble (Photo: Coralie Datta/Historic England/PA)

It is understood the Prime Minister changed his mind on the merits of going back into lockdown when modellers from the Spi-M subcommittee of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies presented him with figures showing that NHS capacity will be exhausted on 4 December if hospitalisations continue on their current trajectory.

A further 162 people have died within 28 days of testing positive for Covid-19 as of Sunday, while there were 23,254 new lab-confirmed cases of coronavirus, bringing

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