Miami Zoo’s resident dentist gives animals check ups for dental week



a group of people sitting around a dog: MailOnline logo


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Dental health is as important for animals as it is for humans.

This week, the furry and fanged residents of Miami-Dade Zoological Park and Gardens, also known as Zoo Miami, went to the dentist. 

A variety of procedures were performed during Dental Week, from cleanings to root canals, and patients included a lion, gorilla, chimpanzee, tapir, aardvark and otters. 

The most common issue was removing accumulated tarter, as well as cracked or broken teeth that had to be repaired or extracted.

All the animals were fully sedated, both for their comfort and the dentist’s safety.

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a person sitting on the floor: Barney, a 27-year-old-gorilla, getting a tooth extracted during 'Dental Week' at Zoo Miami


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Barney, a 27-year-old-gorilla, getting a tooth extracted during ‘Dental Week’ at Zoo Miami

‘We have never had an animal wake up during a procedure,’ said zoo ambassador Ron Magill. ‘They are carefully monitored by an anesthesia team and if they show any sign of awakening, they are administered additional anesthesia to keep them fully sedated.’

Because animals generally don’t complain about dental pain, veterinarians often refer to it as ‘silent suffering.’

By the time anything is discovered, the disease or infection may be so far along that it’s debilitating – or even fatal.

General dental exams are performed on animals during regular health examinations.



a group of stuffed animals sitting next to a woman: Kashifa, a 10-year-old lioness, was well sedated before her tooth was extracted. 'We have never had an animal wake up during a procedure,' said zoo ambassador Ron Magill


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Kashifa, a 10-year-old lioness, was well sedated before her tooth was extracted. ‘We have never had an animal wake up during a procedure,’ said zoo ambassador Ron Magill



a dog wearing a hat: Sedation lasts about three to eight hours, with the dosage depending on the size and age of the animal


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Sedation lasts about three to eight hours, with the dosage depending on the size and age of the animal

If an issue is diagnosed, the zoo’s veterinarians will either resolve it themselves or, depending on its severity, enlist a veterinary dental specialist.

‘Dental health is a key component of the Animal Health Department’s preventative medicine program at Zoo Miami,’ said Magill, who snapped photos of the unusual proceedings. ‘A variety of issues ranging from gum disease to broken teeth can lead to critical care issues that may result in serious infection and even death without treatment.’



a person petting a dog: Veterinary dentist Jamie Berning and her veterinary technician, Jill Bates, traveled to Miami from Columbus, Ohio, to perform procedures on a variety of animals


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Veterinary dentist Jamie Berning and her veterinary technician, Jill Bates, traveled to Miami from Columbus, Ohio, to perform procedures on a variety of animals



a person wearing a costume: The most common issue was removing accumulated tarter, as well as cracked or broken teeth that had to be repaired or extracted


© Provided by Daily Mail
The most common issue was removing accumulated tarter, as well as cracked or broken teeth that had to be repaired or extracted

This week, veterinary dentist Jamie Berning and her veterinary technician, Jill Bates, traveled to Miami from Columbus, Ohio, to perform procedures on a variety of animals.

Barney, the zoo’s 27-year-old gorilla, Hondo, a 26-year-old chimpanzee, and Kashifa, a 10-year-old lioness all had to have teeth extracted.

The procedures, which took between two and seven hours, were spread out over three days.

Sedation lasts about three to eight hours, with the dosage depending on the size and age of the animal.

Dr. Berning was able to treat two to three animals a day.



a person holding an object in his mouth: Hondo, a 26-year-old chimpanzee, also had to have a tooth extracted


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Black Resident Dies After Childbirth, Highlights Tragic Trend

Chaniece Wallace, MD, a chief pediatric resident at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, died on October 24 after complications from preeclampsia 4 days after giving birth prematurely by cesarean delivery, according to her husband, Anthony Wallace.

Their daughter, Charlotte Wallace, was born on October 20 weighing 4.5 pounds. She entered care in the neonatal intensive care unit.

Anthony Wallace told Chaniece’s story on a GoFundMe page, writing: “On October 20th, 2020 [Chaniece’s] doctors informed us that she was developing symptoms of preeclampsia.” He added that she had a ruptured liver and high blood pressure and that her kidney function was declining.

“Chaniece fought with every piece of strength, courage, and faith she had available,” he continued.

In announcing Wallace’s death, Riley Hospital for Children wrote that “it is with grievous and broken hearts that we announce the loss of one of our beloved friends, colleagues, and co-chiefs.” Chaniece “suffered postpartum complications after delivering a healthy 35wk baby girl. [S]he received excellent care at her delivery hospital by a complete and equally devastated healthcare team.”

Fellow co–chief resident Eric Raynal, MD, told Medscape Medical News that Chaniece’s preeclampsia “developed unusually rapidly. It was captured immediately and was especially severe,” he said.

“I think everyone in our community and the medical community that took care of her while hospitalized is at a loss for why her case of preeclampsia was so severe and did not improve after she delivered her baby, Charlotte,” he said.

“As physicians, we try to find answers and reason for everything we do in our practice of medicine, and it is so immensely frustrating when families ask us to explain things that are unexplainable,” Raynal said.

The statement from Riley Hospital said Wallace had completed her pediatrics residency in June and was beginning to explore career options as a general outpatient pediatrician.

“[H]er future impact, sure to be expansive, was taken away from her all too suddenly,” the announcement said.

Black Women at Triple the Risk for Maternal Death

Clinicians commented on social media that Wallace’s death highlights a grim statistic in healthcare in the United States: Black, Native American, and Alaska Native women are two to three times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than White women, according to recent Centers for Disease Control data.

Newborn hospitalist Shawnté James, MD, mourned Wallace’s death on Twitter, saying, “Childbirth isn’t safe for Black Women in America. This is crushing.”

Rachel Vreeman, MD, added: “Heart-broken over a new loss: a female pediatrician at a great academic medical center, with the same terrible pregnancy complication that I had. Except she is Black and she died.”

Raynal said, “What we know and can verify is that preeclampsia is more common in Black women. We would not say Chaniece’s preeclampsia and preeclampsia in women in general is ‘preventable.’ “

Raynal said Wallace was well aware of her risk and that they had talked privately about it routinely. She had also discussed the risks with her medical team.

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Every resident of Kansas nursing home infected with COVID-19

Every resident of a Kansas nursing home has tested positive for COVID-19, and 10 residents have died, according to area health officials. 

The Norton County Health Department confirmed on Monday that all 62 residents of the Andbe Home, a privately owned facility, tested positive for COVID-19. Of the 62 individuals, 10 have died, one is hospitalized and the others are being cared for at the facility. 

The department also confirmed that “some” staff members at the nursing home in Norton have tested positive for the virus, and others are being tested.

“Norton County Health Department has been working with the Andbe Home, Norton County Hospital and [the Kansas Department of Health and Environment] regarding this outbreak. Steps are being taken to prevent any further outbreak including quarantining residents in their rooms and now allowing outside visitors into the facility,” department officials said in a Monday statement, adding that family members of the residents have been notified of the outbreak. 

PRESS RELEASE

Posted by Norton County Health Department and Home Health on Monday, October 19, 2020

The department did not reveal how many residents are experiencing symptoms of the disease.

There have been over 250,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases in nursing homes across the country, according to federal data, as well as over 143,000 suspected cases and over 59,000 fatalities.

Kansas has reported 74,616 cases of COVID-19 and 872 related deaths. Cases across the state have continued to spike since the summer, and at least 13 new coronavirus deaths and 1,894 cases were reported on Monday.

Source Article

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Colorado resident, 20, with ‘mild’ coronavirus case later develops rare condition: officials

A 20-year-old Colorado resident who battled the novel coronavirus later developed a rare but serious condition known as multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C), according to local health officials in the state. 

The resident, of Boulder County, suffered only mild symptoms of COVID-19 and “appeared to have fully recovered,” said county officials in a news release. But three weeks later, the resident fell ill once more — this time with “severe abdominal pain, watery diarrhea, and fever,” all of which are signs of MIS-C. 

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identified the condition among adults, drawing on reports of 27 adult patients to describe a new, similar condition known as multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A). (iStock)

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identified the condition among adults, drawing on reports of 27 adult patients to describe a new, similar condition known as multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A). (iStock)

Since the pandemic began, there have been various reports of multisystem inflammatory syndrome, but most cases have occurred in children, which is known as MIS-C.

The syndrome is an inflammatory condition that is similar to Kawasaki disease, which causes swelling in arteries throughout the body. Many children with MIS-C — which causes inflammation in the heart, lungs, kidneys, brain, skin, eyes, or gastrointestinal organs —  have either been infected with the novel coronavirus or had been exposed to someone with a COVID-19 infection, health officials have sad. MIS-C can also cause persistent fever, rashes, vomiting and diarrhea, among other symptoms such as a red tongue and eyes.

LOUISIANA CHILD’S POSSIBLE CORONAVIRUS-LINKED MIS-C DEATH THE FIRST IN STATE

However, earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identified the condition among adults, drawing on reports of 27 adult patients to describe a new, similar condition known as multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A).

“Findings indicate that adult patients of all ages with current or previous SARS-CoV-2 infection can develop a hyperinflammatory syndrome resembling MIS-C,” the authors wrote at the time, adding that measures to limit COVID-19 spread may help prevent MIS-A.

SERIOUS CORONAVIRUS-RELATED INFLAMMATORY CONDITION AMONG CHILDREN NOW REPORTED IN ADULTS: CDC

The Colorado patient required hospitalization and intensive care before they improved and were eventually discharged from the hospital. However, “while most young adults experience mild symptoms from COVID-19,” officials warned, “this case is an example of how the disease can progress and how little is known about the long-term impacts of the illness.”

RARE CORONAVIRUS-LINKED SYNDROME AFFECTS 11 CHILDREN IN WASHINGTON STATE: OFFICIALS

“I hope sharing the information about this patient’s experience will help others to better understand how serious COVID-19 can be, even for young people,” said Dr. Heather Pujet, an infectious disease doctor at Boulder Community Health, in a statement. “The patient became extremely ill very quickly with multi-organ system involvement; they fortunately recovered after a period of severe illness. However, this should serve as a warning for the younger people in the community to please not disregard their own personal risks with COVID-19.”

“Much remains unknown about how this condition develops, but it’s related to the body’s attempts to fight an invader,” added Dr. Sam Dominguez, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Children’s

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