College of Human Medicine student receives Diversity in Medicine Scholarship | MSUToday

College of Human Medicine student Michelle Walls is the first recipient of a Diversity in Medicine Scholarship under a program created by Dr. Mehmet Oz to inspire future doctors in underserved communities.

Walls learned she would receive the scholarship during an appearance on “The Dr. Oz Show,” which aired Nov. 25. Due to COVID-19, the second-year student appeared on the program through a virtual link. She was under the impression she was only a finalist for the scholarship until Oz announced she was the actual recipient.

“I was really caught off guard,” she said. “It was a perfect surprise.”


College of Human Medicine student Michelle Wallw

 

It was perfect, not only because it recognizes her many volunteer activities and the obstacles she overcame to become a medical student, but also because the $10,000 scholarship goes a long way toward covering her tuition.

The scholarship is part of a broader campaign called More Black Doctors that Oz, a cardiothoracic surgeon and Columbia University professor, founded to encourage more African Americans to become physicians, particularly in underserved communities. Applicants must be undergraduates or in medical school and show a commitment to serve their communities and tackle health inequities.

After applying and undergoing a series of interviews, Walls clearly met the program’s criteria.

“I was so inspired by your dedication, yet you never give up,” Oz told Walls. “One of the things that inspired me about you is you’ve already been out there trying to pass it along, trying to change each other and how we practice medicine.”

Asked what advice she would give others considering a career in medicine, Walls said, “I would say to them to not give up, because for me, my journey wasn’t straight. It definitely wasn’t easy. I heard a lot of ‘no’s’. So you’ve got to put those ‘no’s’ behind you and find someone who tells you that you still can.”

When she was 6 years old, her father died. Three years later, she and her three younger siblings were placed in Detroit-area foster homes because their mother was unable to care for them. When she turned 18, Walls aged out of her third foster home and was on her own.

Struggling with obesity, she embarked on a healthy diet and exercise program and shed the extra pounds. She then founded a nonprofit, Lifestyle Fitness Empowerment Inc., to encourage others to achieve better health through proper nutrition and exercise.

“I basically felt better about myself, and I wanted to show other people how they could do it,” she said.

 After graduating from MSU, Walls was accepted in the College of Human Medicine. She volunteers at a Lansing homeless shelter and with the Spartan Street Medicine, a program run by the Colleges of Human Medicine and Osteopathic Medicine to serve homeless people in Ingham County.

“A lot of it is just talking to them and helping them with whatever they’re going through,” Walls said.

Part of her mission is to share her own story, hoping it is an inspiration for others who might think medical

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CSUSB Palm Desert Street Medicine Program Receives $50K Grant

Press release from CSUSB Palm Desert:

Nov. 23, 2020

The Desert Healthcare District & Foundation has awarded a $50,000 grant to the Cal State San Bernardino Palm Desert Campus to support its Street Medicine program.

Grant funds will be used to improve access to healthcare for traditionally underserved populations, increase mobile medical clinics, improve health-related infrastructure in the Coachella Valley and strengthen engagement of nurses and nursing students with the homeless, unsheltered and vulnerable populations in the Coachella Valley.

The Street Medicine program is a collaborative partnership between the CSUSB Department of Nursing at the Palm Desert Campus; the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine; Desert Regional Medical Center; Well in the Desert; and the Coachella Valley Volunteers in Medicine.

“The funds from the Desert Healthcare District & Foundation will provide support for us to continue our efforts to grow our Street Medicine program,” said Diane Vines, street medicine program coordinator and CSUSB nursing faculty member. “We are providing much-needed healthcare services for homeless and unsheltered people in the Coachella Valley, and preparing our future nurses to understand the needs of this vulnerable population.”

“Through the Street Medicine program, nurses and nursing students provide an invaluable service, taking medical care to Coachella Valley residents who may not receive it any other way,” said Carole Rogers, an RN and Desert Healthcare District and Foundation Board director. “Their work directly supports the District’s mission ‘to achieve optimal health at all stages of life for all District residents,’ and we’re happy to support them.”

Also, visit the Desert Healthcare District & Foundation website at www.DHCD.org to learn more about its programs.

The CSUSB Palm Desert Campus offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees, a doctorate in educational leadership, and teaching credentials and certificates. With more than 1,600 students, it is the Coachella Valley’s four-year public university and plays a vital role in educating and training the region’s growing population.

For more information about the CSUSB Palm Desert Campus, contact Mike Singer in the Office of Strategic Communication at [email protected] or (760) 341-2883, ext. 78107, or visit the PDC website at www.csusb.edu/pdc.


This press release was produced by CSUSB Palm Desert. The views expressed here are the author’s own.

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Addex Receives Additional $2.8 million from Indivior and Extends GABAB PAM Research Collaboration

Geneva, Switzerland, November 2, 2020 – Addex Therapeutics Ltd (SIX and Nasdaq: ADXN), a leading company pioneering allosteric modulation-based drug discovery and development, today announced that the research term of the agreement signed with Indivior PLC (LON: INDV) in January 2018 has been extended until June 30, 2021. The collaboration with Indivior covers the discovery of novel oral gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subtype B (GABAB) positive allosteric modulator (PAM) compounds as potential therapies for multiple disease areas. As part of the amended agreement, Indivior has agreed to pay Addex $2.8 million in research funding and expand the therapeutic areas where Addex has exclusivity to develop retained compounds.

“The extension of our research collaboration and the additional funding from Indivior is a clear recognition of the potential of our allosteric modulator discovery platform and the significant achievements of our drug discovery team,” said Tim Dyer, CEO of Addex. “Indivior is a world leader in the development of addiction medication and strongly committed to GABAB PAM as a potential treatment for addiction including alcohol use disorder.”

“Although 200 health conditions have been linked to harmful alcohol use,1 there are few pharmacotherapies for alcohol use disorder (AUD) – their efficacy and uptake in clinical practice are limited, and patient acceptance is minimal. We are, therefore, very pleased to expand our partnership with Addex Therapeutics to discover and profile new potent and selective GABAB PAMs and provide a new class of medications that has the potential to achieve therapeutic benefits in patients suffering from AUD,” said Christian Heidbreder, Chief Scientific Officer of Indivior.

“Due to the extensive validation of GABAB activation with baclofen, we believe a novel, orally available GABAB PAM could provide significant benefits to patients in many therapeutics areas,” said Jean-Philippe Rocher, Co-Head of Discovery. “We have advanced multiple novel chemical series’ to late stages of lead optimization and we look forward to rapidly delivering first-in-class compounds for Indivior to advance into clinical development.”

Under the terms of the original agreement signed with Indivior in January 2018, Addex received a $5 million upfront payment and has since received $5.6 million research funding. Addex is eligible to receive up to $330 million of development, regulatory and commercialization milestones as well as tiered royalties up to teen double-digit. In addition, Addex has the right to retain certain compounds and pursue their development for reserved indications outside addiction, including for the treatment of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1a (CMT1A) neuropathy, a rare inherited disorder that affects peripheral nerves. Addex has discovered novel GABAB PAMs and has made significant progress in optimization of potential drug candidates. Addex expects to enter clinical candidate selection phase by end of 2020 and deliver drug candidates for IND enabling studies by the end of 2021 for both Indivior and for its in-house CMT1A program.

About GABAB Activation with PAM

Activation of the GABAB receptor, a Family C class of GPCR, is clinically and commercially validated by the generic GABAB

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Connecticut Department of Public Health receives five-year, $3.5M grant from CDC to fund suicide prevention efforts

The Connecticut Department of Public Health has received a five-year, $3.5 million grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to enhance statewide suicide prevention efforts, Gov. Ned Lamont announced at St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center in Hartford Thursday morning.

The grant, which runs through Aug. 31, 2025, will be a joint effort between DPH, the Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, the Connecticut Department of Children and Families and UConn Health. The prevention efforts will concentrate on populations that are disproportionately impacted by suicide or attempted suicide, including middle-aged adults, particularly men with mental illness or substance use disorder, and adolescents and young adults (ages 10-24).

State officials at the news conference spoke about the intense mental health toll the COVID-19 pandemic has taken on Connecticut residents.

With COVID-19 cases increasing and the winter approaching, “I can feel the stress building again,” Lamont said. He described a “witches’ brew” of health concerns, economic distress and social isolation.

“I hear a lot of, ‘I thought we had a light at the end of the COVID tunnel and it looks like it’s receding,’ ” Lamont said. “I hear the economic anxiety every day.”

Dr. Steven Wolf, chairman of emergency medicine at St. Francis, said that social isolation has exacerbated local residents’ experiences of mental illness and substance use disorder.

Seven people under the age of 18 have died by suicide in Connecticut this year, including four since October, according to Miriam Delphin-Rittmon, the commissioner of the state Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services.

Connecticut averages about eight suicides of children under the age of 18 annually, Vannessa Dorantes, the commissioner of the state’s Department of Children and Families, said. She emphasized that the state must “work together to get that number to zero.”

On average, 403 Connecticut residents died annually of suicide between 2015 and 2019, a 14% increase from the annual average of 351 residents between 2010 and 2014, according to state officials.

“Though Connecticut has one of the lowest suicide rates in the United States, we know even one death is too much,” Delphin-Rittmon said.

Karen Jarmoc, president & CEO of the Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence, said that calls to CTSafeConnect, the organization’s domestic violence hotline, rose by 30% due to the COVID-19 pandemic and domestic violence advocacy groups across the state faced increased demand for their services.

“When the pandemic hit in March in our state, understandably there were shut-in orders to keep people safe from a public health standpoint,” Jarmoc said. “From our perspective, it created a precarious situation where victims of domestic violence were shut in with their abusive partner.”

Early in the pandemic, 18 sites across the state that house victims of domestic violence had to send some people to hotels in order to reduce capacity and the risk of a COVID-19 outbreak, she said. That resulted in more than $390,000 in unexpected fees to house about 200 adults and 200 children in hotels, from March through

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Nexus Pharmaceuticals Receives FDA Approval for Succinylcholine Chloride Injection, USP

Nexus Pharmaceuticals announced it has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for Succinylcholine Chloride Injection, USP in 200mg/10mL Multiple-Dose Vials. It is an AP-rated generic to QUELICIN™¥.

“Nexus Pharmaceuticals is very pleased to announce the approval of Succinylcholine Chloride. This critical need drug has seen an increased demand due to the COVID-19 pandemic and Nexus will be ready to meet the challenge. This approval further cements Nexus’ commitment to alleviating the drug shortage crisis with sterile injectable products produced exclusively in the US and Europe,” said Mariam S. Darsot, CEO & President of Nexus Pharmaceuticals.

Nexus Pharmaceuticals’ Succinylcholine Chloride Injection will be available in cartons of 25 vials.

About Succinylcholine Chloride Injection, USP

Succinylcholine Chloride Injection, USP is a sterile, nonpyrogenic solution to be used as an ultra-short-acting, depolarizing, skeletal muscle relaxant. Succinylcholine is indicated as an adjunct to general anesthesia, to facilitate tracheal intubation, and to provide skeletal muscle relaxation during surgery or mechanical ventilation.

For prescribing information, please see the following link.

About Nexus Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Nexus Pharmaceuticals Inc., a US-based healthcare company, specializes in innovative processes to make difficult-to-manufacture specialty and generic drugs that are easier to use, less labor intensive, and more streamlined in practice. Nexus ensures that its high-quality FDA-approved drugs fulfill a critical unmet medical need and delivers dependable life-saving treatment options when and where they’re needed most.

¥QUELICIN is a registered trademark of Hospira, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Pfizer Inc.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201029006301/en/

Contacts

Diana Lebiecki
847-996-3790
[email protected]

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Hodgson receives boost as FIVE Crystal Palace players return to fitness ahead of trip to Wolves

Roy Hodgson receives major boost as FIVE Crystal Palace players including new signing Jack Butland return to fitness ahead of trip to Wolves

  • Gary Cahill and James Tomkins, who were both out with thigh injuries, are back
  • Jordan Ayew and summer signing Jack Butland are back after self-isolating
  • The striker and the new goalkeeper tested positive for coronavirus recently
  • James McCarthy is also back in training after picking up an injury with Ireland

Crystal Palace have received a significant injury boost ahead of Friday’s Premier League trip to Wolverhampton Wanderers, with manager Roy Hodgson confirming that five first-team players have returned to full fitness.

Defenders Gary Cahill and James Tomkins, who were both out with thigh injuries, are available for the game at Molineux, while striker Jordan Ayew and new goalkeeper Jack Butland are back after self-isolating following positive tests for COVID-19.

Central midfielder James McCarthy is also back in training after picking up an injury on international duty with Ireland.

Roy Hodgson has been boosted by the news of five Crystal Palace players returning to fitness

Roy Hodgson has been boosted by the news of five Crystal Palace players returning to fitness

New signing Jack Butland is back after the goalkeeper tested positive for coronavirus

New signing Jack Butland is back after the goalkeeper tested positive for coronavirus

Centre-back Gary Cahill also returns following a thigh injury to the former Chelsea defender

Centre-back Gary Cahill also returns following a thigh injury to the former Chelsea defender

‘We just need to assess Tyrick Mitchell before tomorrow who picked up a knock yesterday and Joel Ward,’ Hodgson told reporters on Thursday. 

‘But I’m not making too many complaints, the squad is as big and competitive as I’ve seen it.

‘I’m just trying to keep everybody as happy as possible. It might be the first time I’ve had to leave people out of an 18-man squad – that really is an unusual situation.’

Tomkins returns from a thigh injury

Ayew also tested positive for coronavirus but now returns from quarantine

James Tomkins (left) also returns from injury as does Jordan Ayew (right) does from quarantine

Midfielder James McCarthy is also back in training after picking up an injury with Ireland

Midfielder James McCarthy is also back in training after picking up an injury with Ireland

Palace beat bottom side Fulham 2-1 away last weekend and Hodgson said he expected a tight contest against Wolves, who are unbeaten in their last three Premier League games and ninth in the table, one place below Palace but level on points.

‘We’re expecting a very, very tough game. It’s nice to go there with 10 points and a bit of confidence, but so have they,’ Hodgson said.

‘We do know they have the ability to put you under the cosh for a long period of time, and it will be up to us to produce the quality to relieve that pressure.’

Hodgson also confirmed the club will assess Tyrick Mitchell ahead of the game against Wolves

Hodgson also confirmed the club will assess Tyrick Mitchell ahead of the game against Wolves

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St. Charles dentist Dr. John Mason receives Barth Award

You might say Dr. John Mason was a quick study upon his arrival in St. Charles in 1987 when adding his name to the dental practice of Dr. John Dickens on the east side of the city.

He absorbed a lesson he knew he was cut out for, in learning about the various organizations and causes throughout the area that needed volunteers.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

Mason credits former TriCity Family Services board president Pat Crull with giving him an idea of how the agency operated and how area volunteers helped various organizations.

“She encouraged me to get involved (with the agency), and that relationship started in the 1990s and continues to this day,” Mason said.

Mason has carried that love of helping others to this moment, and it has earned him TriCity Family Services’ 36th annual William D. Barth Award for community service.

“The description of the Barth Award and its focus on community giving is meaningful, and I recognize many recipients with whom I have much respect,” Mason said during a virtual recognition announcement Wednesday night. “Personally, I understand to be recognized in this way, there is a supporting cast of mentors and advocates. My parents and grandparents were exceptional mentors, and I witnessed their giving hands in all areas of community giving.”

Mason came to St. Charles after completing his dental degree at Northwestern University and a residency at Charity Hospital in New Orleans. In the past 33 years, he has compiled an impressive list of community commitments — the American Cancer Society, Bunco for Breast Cancer, Dentist with a Heart, Feed My Starving Children, Hands of Hope board, Knights of Columbus, Lazarus House, and Living Well Center. In addition, he’s been involved in St. Pat’s Emerald Evening, the St. Charles East Kick-a-Thon, Special Olympics, St. Charles Makes a Difference, St. John Neumann Catholic Church, St. Charles Education Foundation and being a TCFS board member.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

He has also provided free dental services to patients at the Tri City Health Partnership. Kim Lamansky, executive director of Tri City Health Partnership, nominated Mason for the Barth honor.

“Almost every day, I meet someone who is very giving in what they do, and it is an inspiration,” Mason said. “The relationships I have developed through TriCity Family Services, Lazarus House and Tri City Health Partnership has nurtured friendships and sincere advocates.”

Those advocates throughout the years “have been instrumental, I know, in this award coming my way,” Mason added. “It is with deep thanks to all of you, I accept the award and sincerely appreciate it.”

To the coach:

When starting a journalism career as a prep sports writer, you have to rely on athletic directors and coaches to cooperate and provide insight that can help the rest of your career.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

I was lucky to have that in the Tri-Cities area, and that’s why it’s always sad to see

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Taysha Gene Therapies Receives Rare Pediatric Disease Designation and Orphan Drug Designation for TSHA-104 to Treat SURF1-Associated Leigh Syndrome

Taysha anticipated to submit Investigational New Drug Application for TSHA-104 to FDA in 2021

Rare pediatric disease and orphan drug designations now obtained in multiple pipeline programs, including TSHA-101 for GM2 gangliosidosis, TSHA-102 for Rett syndrome and TSHA-118 for CLN1

Taysha Gene Therapies Inc. (Nasdaq: TSHA), a patient-centric gene therapy company focused on developing and commercializing AAV-based gene therapies for the treatment of monogenic diseases of the central nervous system in both rare and large patient populations, today announced that it has received rare pediatric disease designation and orphan drug designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for TSHA-104, an AAV9-based gene therapy in development for SURF1-associated Leigh syndrome. Taysha anticipates it will submit an Investigational New Drug (IND) application to the FDA for TSHA-104 in 2021.

“We have now obtained rare pediatric disease and orphan drug designations in multiple gene therapy programs, which we believe will allow us to work more effectively with the FDA as we advance our broad portfolio,” said RA Session II, President, CEO and Founder of Taysha. “The receipt of these designations highlights the dedication that our team has to advancing our gene therapy pipeline as efficiently and rapidly as possible.”

Leigh syndrome is a severe neurological disorder that usually presents in the first year of life. It is characterized by progressive loss of mental and movement abilities that can result in death within two to three years. Approximately 10-15% of people with Leigh syndrome have a SURF1 mutation.

“Being diagnosed with a mutation in the SURF1 gene is a truly devastating event for families,” said Kasey Woleben, Founder of Cure SURF1 Foundation. “Taysha’s commitment to developing a gene therapy for SURF1 deficiency is greatly welcomed by the patient community and has the potential to save the lives of children afflicted with this progressive disorder.”

Taysha has secured rare pediatric disease designation and orphan drug designation for multiple of its programs, including GM2 gangliosidosis, CLN1, Rett syndrome and now SURF1. In addition to these designations, the company also has fast track status for the CLN1 program.

“SURF1 deficiency is a monogenic mitochondrial disorder and is the most common cause of cytochrome c oxidase deficient Leigh syndrome,” said Steven Gray, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Advisor of Taysha and Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at UT Southwestern. “Obtaining these key designations highlights our commitment to developing a gene therapy for the treatment of SURF1 deficiency.”

The FDA defines a rare pediatric disease as a serious or life-threatening disease in which the disease manifestations primarily affect individuals aged from birth to 18 years. Pediatric diseases recognized as “rare” affect under 200,000 people in the U.S. The Rare Pediatric Disease Priority Review Voucher Program is intended to address the challenges that drug companies face when developing treatments for these unique patient populations. Under this program, companies are eligible to receive a priority review voucher following approval of a product with rare pediatric disease designation if the marketing application submitted for the product satisfies certain

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DVIDS – News – BACH Process Improvement team receives coveted Army Medicine Wolf Pack Award


FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. – A team of Soldiers and Department of the Army civilians were formally recognized Oct. 21 for their innovative process-improvement initiative that streamlined patient access to behavioral health resources enhancing patient outcomes and medical readiness.

U.S. Army Surgeon General and Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command Lt. Gen. R. Scott Dingle and Army Medicine Chief of Staff and Chief of the Army Medical Department Civilian Corps Mr. Richard Beauchemin presented a team from Blanchfield Army Community Hospital on Fort Campbell, Kentucky with the coveted Army Medicine Wolf Pack Award during a virtual award ceremony.

“You all should be extremely pleased because there are a lot of entries that go in for the Wolf Pack Award and for you all to receive this extreme honor speaks volumes about the impact you and the entire team are having not just on the installation there, but in the entire United States Army,” said Dingle, over a virtual teleconference.

Created by the 43rd Army Surgeon General and the fourth AMEDD Civilian Corps Chief, the Wolf Pack Award is issued quarterly and recognizes exceptional teamwork by an integrated group of military and civilian team members focused on excellence in support of Army Medicine.

BACH’s team was recognized for the second quarter of fiscal year 2020 for their efforts to better incorporate the hospital’s behavioral health consultants within the hospital’s primary care clinics to enhance patient outcomes and medical readiness. During the initiative, internal behavioral health consultants were assigned to each of BACH’s medical homes, where beneficiaries receive their primary medical care. Consultants support healthy behavior changes such as increasing exercise, decreasing work or home stress, quitting smoking, cholesterol and blood pressure management, and weight management. They also help patients develop plans for improving sleep, managing diabetes, managing chronic pain, migraine management, and modifying alcohol use. Prior to the process improvement project, which began in 2018, their services were underutilized.

“Having behavioral health consultants within our primary care clinics is a great benefit for all enrolled beneficiaries to receive behavioral health support, whether immediately following a primary care visit or scheduled at a later time,” said Col. Patrick T. Birchfield, hospital commander. “This system makes the referral process easy for both the patient and the medical team.”

The behavioral health consultants operate within primary care treatment teams, offering behavioral interventions, counseling, and various treatment modalities and work hand-in-hand with primary care teams to improve a patient’s overall health and quality of life.

BACH’s project focused on four main areas: increasing referrals, improving integration into a holistic model of care, increasing self-referral appointments and warm hand-off of patients to behavioral health consultants, and removing barriers to referring patients.

The project more than doubled the number of face-to-face clinical encounters per day and decreased the patient no-show rate by 15 percent. The team instituted multiple revisions and changes that enhanced the overall patient-centered medical experience, and streamlined patient access for numerous behavioral health needs including reformulating their methods as a result of the pandemic.

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Nicox’s NCX 470 Receives Approval by Chinese Authorities for Local Start of Mont Blanc Phase 3 Trial

 

October 26, 2020 – release at 7:30 am
Sophia Antipolis, France

 

Nicox SA (Euronext Paris: FR0013018124, COX), an international ophthalmology company, today announced that its partner, Ocumension Therapeutics, has received approval from China’s Center for Drug Evaluation of the National Medical Products Administration to carry out the Chinese part of the ongoing Mont Blanc trial, the first Phase 3 clinical trial on NCX 470 for the lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.

 

NCX 470, Nicox’s lead clinical product candidate, is a novel second generation nitric oxide (NO)-donating bimatoprost analog exclusively licensed to Ocumension Therapeutics for the Chinese, Korean and South East Asian markets.

 

Dr. José Boyer, VP and Interim Head of R&D at Nicox, said: “We are pleased with this second Chinese IND approval in our collaboration with Ocumension.  NCX 470 development remains on track, with first results from the Mont Blanc trial expected in Q4 2021.  Initiation of Chinese sites in this trial will be essential in preparing the way for Denali, the second Phase 3 trial with NCX 470, which will include a larger number of Chinese patients.”

 

The Press Release by Ocumension can be found here:

The NCX 470 Mont Blanc Phase 3 clinical trial is a 3-month trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of NCX 470 ophthalmic solution, 0.1%, versus the current standard of care, latanoprost ophthalmic solution, 0.005%, for the lowering of IOP in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.  The Mont Blanc trial is expected to randomize approximately 670 patients, at around 50 clinical sites in the U.S. and at a small number of clinical sites in China.  The Mont Blanc trial was initiated in the U.S. in June 2020 and top-line results are currently expected in Q4 2021. 

Nicox and Ocumension will jointly fund the second NCX 470 Phase 3 glaucoma trial, Denali, which is expected to start by end of 2020 and will also evaluate NCX 470 ophthalmic solution, 0.1%, versus latanoprost ophthalmic solution, 0.005%.  The Denali trial will include clinical sites in both the U.S. and China, with the large majority of the patients to be recruited in the U.S.  The Denali trial was designed to fulfill the regulatory requirements to support New Drug Application (NDA) filings in the U.S. and China.

 

NCX 470 is a novel, potential best-in-class, second generation nitric oxide (NO)-donating bimatoprost analog in development to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.  Glaucoma is a group of ocular diseases in which the optic nerve is injured, leading to peripheral and, ultimately, central visual field loss and it can eventually lead to blindness if not treated. It is frequently linked to abnormally high IOP (~90% of patients) due to blockage or malfunction of the eye’s aqueous humor drainage system in the front of the eye.  In 2019, worldwide sales of treatments targeting glaucoma were over $6.0 billion out of a $21.9 billion worldwide market for ophthalmic drugs. 

NCX 470 is designed

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