Virginia Coronavirus Case Average Reaches New High In Last Week

VIRGINIA — The seven-day average of new coronavirus cases has reached a new peak in Virginia as cases have been over 1,000 for six straight days.

Because the Virginia Department of Health coronavirus dashboard was down for maintenance for much of Saturday, we’re providing an update on the weekend. The month of October ended with 1,551 new cases on Saturday, and 1,202 were reported on Sunday. Cumulative cases total 182,392.

The seven-day case average is 1,289 and has been increasing in the last week. The highest new case count in October had been 1,844 on Oct. 8, but that was attributed to a backlog of cases from the previous day.

By region, the new cases on Sunday included 373 in the southwest region, 300 in the northern region, 186 in the central region, 180 in the northwest region and 163 in the eastern region. The southwest region also reported 582 new cases on Saturday, marking the highest daily cases to date for the region.

The statewide positive average is up to 5.7 percent with 2,647,659 PCR tests completed to date. Seven-day averages by region are 9.4 percent in the southwest region, 5.6 percent in the northern region, 5.4 percent in the central region, 4.3 percent in the eastern region, and 3.5 percent in the northwest region.

There was just one new death reported on Sunday and 11 on Saturday. Total deaths to date are up to 3,655. When looking at deaths by the date on death certificates, the highest seven-day average remains 40.1 deaths on May 5. Data may be incomplete for the last few weeks, but the average has been half of the May 5 peak or less in recent months.

Cumulative hospitalizations stand at 12,647, while the current patient count is 1,012. By region, that includes 284 in the southwest region, 242 in the northern region, 196 in the central region, 162 in the eastern region, and 128 in the northwest region.

The 1,012 statewide hospitalizations include 98 patients on ventilators and 228 in the intensive care units, according to the Virginia Hospital & Healthcare Association. Ventilator use among all hospital patients stands at 28 percent, and ICU occupancy is at 61 percent occupancy. No hospitals are reporting difficulty obtaining personal protective equipment or other medical supplies in the next 72 hours.

Outbreaks, defined as two or more laboratory-confirmed cases in a setting, account for 28,019 cases to date. There have been 12,608 cases and 1,782 deaths in long-term care facilities. K-12 settings account for 212 cases and no deaths, while colleges and universities have 2,466 outbreak-associated cases and no deaths.

Below are the latest coronavirus data updates for our coverage area from Friday to Sunday:

  • Alexandria: 4,349 cases, 325 hospitalizations, 74 deaths; increase of 46 cases and one hospitalization

  • Arlington County: 4,764 cases, 541 hospitalizations, 154 deaths; increase of 78 cases

  • Fairfax County: 24,233 cases, 2,287 hospitalizations, 605 deaths; increase of 289 cases and nine hospitalizations

  • Fairfax City: 164 cases, 14 hospitalizations, eight deaths;

Read more

Will-Kankakee Coronavirus Positivity Rate Reaches 10.5 Percent

JOLIET, IL — Coronavirus positivity rates and the number of new hospitalizations of people with symptoms of COVID-19 rose sharply across nearly every region of Illinois during the final week in October. All but one of the state’s 11 mitigation regions now have restrictions on indoor service at bars and restaurants and gatherings of more than 25 people.

In Region 7 — Will and Kankakee counties — indoor dining was again halted after the region’s seven-day rolling average positivity rate remained above 8 percent for three days last week.

For the week ending Tuesday, the percentage of specimens tested that came back positive for the virus rose by 1.3 percentage points to 10.5 percent in the two-county region — a new record for the region since state public health officials began reporting the data in June. The next day, the seven-day rolling average rose again to 10.8 percent, setting another record.

New hospitalizations in the south suburban region also rose during the week, according to the rounded seven-day rolling average of daily hospital admissions of patients with what state public health officials classify as “COVID-like illnesses,” or CLI.

The rate has more than tripled since the start of October. As of Tuesday, an average of 21 people were newly hospitalized with symptoms of the virus every day, up from 16 a week earlier.

Dr. Ngozi Ezike, director of the Illinois Department of Public Health, said the state needs everyone to do their part to change the trend.

“We are on the precipice of the entire state entering into mitigation,” Ezike said Friday, announcing the new mitigation measures for Region 6 in East Central Illinois.

RELATED: Coronavirus Indoor Dining Ban Imposed On Lake, McHenry Counties

Restrictions were added to 10 of Illinois' 11 COVID-19 resurgence mitigation regions in October after coronavirus metrics triggered fail-safe measures established over the summer by state public health officials. (Illinois Department of Public Health)
Restrictions were added to 10 of Illinois’ 11 COVID-19 resurgence mitigation regions in October after coronavirus metrics triggered fail-safe measures established over the summer by state public health officials. (Illinois Department of Public Health)

RELATED: Illinois Restaurant Association To Vote On Indoor Dining Ban Suit

“These last few regions have seen rapid increases in test positivity, one right after another, because of increasing disease spread throughout our communities,” Ezike said. “We need all people to adhere to both the community mitigation measures and well as personal and family measures so we can swiftly turn our entire state around.”

As of Friday, there were 49 counties across the state, including several in the Chicago area, that are considered to be at the “orange” warning level, which means two or more countywide risk indicators suggest a heightened risk of the virus.

They include: Adams, Alexander, Bond, Boone, Clark, Clay, Clinton, Coles, Crawford, Cumberland, DeKalb, Douglas, DuPage, Effingham, Ford, Franklin, Greene, Grundy, Hamilton, Henderson, Jackson, Jo Daviess, Johnson, Kane, Kendall, Knox, Lee, Macon, Marion, McHenry, Mercer, Morgan, Ogle, Perry, Pike, Randolph, Rock Island, Saline, Sangamon, Shelby, Stephenson, Wabash, Warren, Washington, Wayne, Whiteside, Will, Williamson and Winnebago counties.

RELATED: Pritzker Defends Coronavirus Data Used To Ban Indoor Dining

On Friday, public health officials announced 6,943 new confirmed cases

Read more

Covid cases, hospitalizations continue to surge as U.S. reaches ‘critical point’ in pandemic

  • Three dozen states reported that the average number of people currently hospitalized with Covid-19 rose by at least 5% over the past week.
  • “We are at another critical point in the pandemic response,” said Adm. Brett Giroir, assistant secretary of health who leads the government’s testing effort.
  • Giroir went on to emphasize that “we can control the virus” by following public health measures like social distancing, mask wearing, avoiding crowded gatherings and the frequent washing of hands.



a group of people standing around a plane: Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) arrive with a correctional patient at North Shore Medical Center where the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients are treated, in Miami, Florida, U.S. July 14, 2020.


© Provided by CNBC
Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) arrive with a correctional patient at North Shore Medical Center where the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients are treated, in Miami, Florida, U.S. July 14, 2020.

The United States is reporting another record-high average number of new cases of the coronavirus as a top health official warned Wednesday that the country is at a “critical point.”

The U.S. reported 73,240 new cases on Tuesday, bringing the seven-day average of new cases up to about 71,832, a fresh record and an increase of more than 20% compared with a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of data collected by Johns Hopkins University.

Three dozen states reported that the average number of people currently hospitalized with Covid-19 rose by at least 5% over the past week, according to data from the Covid Tracking Project, which tracks testing, hospitalization and other data on the outbreak. Cases are up by at least that amount in 45 states, according to Hopkins data.

“As the nation did after Memorial Day, we are at another critical point in the pandemic response,” Adm. Brett Giroir, assistant secretary of health who leads the government’s testing effort, said Wednesday on the TODAY show. “Cases are going up in most states across the country. Hospitalizations are up, although we’re still tens of thousands of hospitalizations below where we were in July, but that is rising. And we are starting to see the increase in deaths.”



chart, histogram


© Provided by CNBC


Giroir acknowledged that increased testing alone cannot explain the surge in cases, even as President Donald Trump attributes the surge to testing alone and continues to downplay the outbreak.

Giroir went on to emphasize that “we can control the virus” by following public health measures like social distancing, mask wearing, avoiding crowded gatherings and the frequent washing of hands.

The surge in cases and hospitalizations is beginning to overwhelm some hospitals in parts of the country. The Salt Lake Tribune reported over the weekend that the Utah Hospital Association is asking the governor to allow them to ration care. And in Texas, El Paso County Judge Ricardo Samaniego issued a curfew on Sunday to protect “overwhelmed and exhausted” hospitals and workers.

Public health specialists and epidemiologists have warned for months that the virus would likely surge as the weather turned colder in the fall and winter. That’s largely because people are more likely to stay indoors in colder weather and because some epidemiologists believe the virus can spread more easily through colder, drier air.

Dr. Bill

Read more

Seven-Day Average of New Coronavirus Cases in U.S. Reaches All-Time High

The average number of new coronavirus cases reported daily over the past week reached an all-time high of 68,767 on Monday, another indication that the U.S. is experiencing a fresh surge of infections as the weather turns cooler.

The figures, based on a Wall Street Journal analysis of Johns Hopkins data, have increased steadily this month and include back-to-back days of more than 80,000 cases over this past week.

Since a surge of infections over the summer, the seven-day average of new cases dipped to as low as 34,354 a day in mid-September and hovered between 40,000 to 45,000 a day later that month and into October.

Health officials often point to the seven-day average of new cases as a smoother analysis of coronavirus trends in communities and around the country.

Many epidemiologists and public health officials anticipated a surge in new coronavirus infections this fall as cooler temperatures pushed Americans indoors and behaviors changed with the seasons. But this increase in new cases is coming sooner than some expected.

Since Oct. 5, the seven-day average of newly reported cases nationally has exceeded the 14-day average, demonstrating a rise in reported cases in recent weeks. This was the case Monday in 44 states and Washington, D.C., according to the Journal’s analysis of Johns Hopkins data, as surges in reported infections have been reported across every region of the country.

The number of tests reported each day has increased, but so has the percent of those returning positive. On Monday, the seven-day average percentage of positive tests sat at 6.25%, more than the average 4.5% seen at the beginning of the month.

Vice President Mike Pence’s chief of staff and top campaign adviser, as well as at least three others close to Mr. Pence, tested positive for Covid-19, the Journal reported over the weekend. Mr. Pence plans to continue with campaign events ahead of Election Day after consulting with White House medical staff. Guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advise individuals potentially exposed to a person infected with Covid-19 to quarantine.

Source Article

Read more

U.S. 7-Day Average of Coronavirus Cases Reaches All-Time High | Health News

The U.S. is averaging more daily coronavirus cases than at any previous point in the pandemic.

Data from Johns Hopkins University shows the nation’s seven-day average for infections is near 69,000 daily cases. The former highest peak came in July at an average of over 67,000 cases per day.

The development comes as the U.S. has entered the third peak of its outbreak. The weekend saw massive numbers of new cases, with more than 83,000 infections added on both Friday and Saturday.

Photos: Daily Life, Disrupted

TOPSHOT - A passenger in an outfit (R) poses for a picture as a security guard wearing a facemask as a preventive measure against the Covid-19 coronavirus stands nearby on a last century-style boat, featuring a theatrical drama set between the 1920s and 1930s in Wuhan, in Chinas central Hubei province on September 27, 2020. (Photo by Hector RETAMAL / AFP) (Photo by HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP via Getty Images)

The U.S. reports the most infections and fatalities out of any country, with more than 8.6 million infections and over 225,000 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University’s tracker. Every region is seeing an increase in cases, with the South and the Midwest reporting the majority of new infections, according to data from The COVID Tracking Project.

Experts are concerned that as the country heads deeper into fall and winter, cold weather will push more people indoors, possibly increasing the spread of the virus. The challenge could also be compounded by the flu season.

“We are likely to see a very dense epidemic,” former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb told CNBC on Monday. “I think we are right now at the cusp of what is going to be exponential spread in parts of the country.”

Gottlieb said the U.S. is at a “tipping point” but added that “if we took some aggressive, targeted steps right now we could potentially forestall the worst of it.”

But the Trump administration has a very different message as to the state of the country’s outbreak, with President Donald Trump repeatedly claiming that it is “rounding the corner.”

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows on Sunday said the federal government would focus on developing vaccines and therapeutics rather than controlling the outbreak.

“We are not going to control the pandemic. We are going to control the fact that we get vaccines, therapeutics and other mitigation areas,” Meadows told CNN.

Meanwhile, the virus has infiltrated Vice President Mike Pence’s inner circle, infecting his chief of staff and other top aides, but Pence has decided not to quarantine and is instead continuing on his regular scheduling with Election Day nearing.

Source Article

Read more

Colombia reaches 1 million confirmed coronavirus cases

BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — Colombia reached 1 million confirmed coronavirus cases on Saturday, becoming the second country in Latin America to report that number in less than a week.

The nation of 50 million saw cases peak in August and has seen a decline since but still continues to register around 8,000 new infections a day.

Epidemiologists expect to see another marked increase by the end of the year, a prognosis that has put medical workers like nurse Freddy Harvey Rodríguez and his doctor son at one of Bogota’s largest hospitals on edge.

“The fear is it’s going to be worse,” Rodríguez said on a recent afternoon.


Argentina hit 1 million confirmed cases on Monday and Peru and Mexico are expected to reach the grim marker in the weeks ahead. Brazil ranks third worldwide in the number of virus cases and passed 1 million infections back in June.

Overall, Latin America continues to register some of the highest caseloads, diagnosing more than 100,000 confirmed infections each day, though the World Health Organization reports that Europe is now seeing even larger numbers as a second virus wave strikes.

Experts say the region is experiencing a table-top like effect in which cases remain relatively high instead of dramatically dropping. In a number of countries, the virus has begun spreading to areas that had previously registered relatively few cases.

“The behavior of the virus is different,” said Dr. Luis Jorge Hernández, a public health professor at the University of the Andes in Colombia. “It’s not big resurgences but new outbreaks.”

In Colombia, a six-month lockdown helped slow contagion and gave officials time to expand the number of ICU beds. While cases rose dramatically in Bogota, stretching hospital capacity, the city has managed to avoid the sorts of dire scenes seen elsewhere in the region of patients lined up outside hospitals, struggling to find a bed.

Nonetheless, the cost has been high: Nearly 30,000 people have died, including a number of medical workers like colleagues of Rodríguez. One count by a medical association estimates that nearly 200 physicians and other workers have died.

Rodríguez said his son spent over $100 buying him protective gear at the start of the pandemic. The pair still worry about getting sick. Both work at Bogota’s Kennedy Hospital, which is located in a sprawling working-class neighborhood. The area has the highest total number of cases anywhere in the bustling capital.

Dr. Camilo Rodríguez said he arrives to work in one uniform and changes into another when he treats COVID-19 patients. He lost a close friend and mentor to the virus and fears spreading it to his family.

As an extra precaution, he showers at the hospital before going home.

“Infecting myself would be infecting my family,” he said.

The path of the virus through Latin America is a consequence of weak public health systems, social factors like poverty and poor government decisions early on that resulted in flawed or limited testing and little contact tracing. Today the region is

Read more

Colombia Reaches 1 Million Confirmed Coronavirus Cases | World News

BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — Colombia reached 1 million confirmed coronavirus cases on Saturday, becoming the second country in Latin America to report that number in less than a week.

The nation of 50 million saw cases peak in August and has seen a decline since but still continues to register around 8,000 new infections a day.

Epidemiologists expect to see another marked increase by the end of the year, a prognosis that has put medical workers like nurse Freddy Harvey Rodríguez and his doctor son at one of Bogota’s largest hospitals on edge.

“The fear is it’s going to be worse,” Rodríguez said on a recent afternoon.

Argentina hit 1 million confirmed cases on Monday and Peru and Mexico are expected to reach the grim marker in the weeks ahead. Brazil ranks third worldwide in the number of virus cases and passed 1 million infections back in June.

Overall, Latin America continues to register some of the highest caseloads, diagnosing more than 100,000 confirmed infections each day, though the World Health Organization reports that Europe is now seeing even larger numbers as a second virus wave strikes.

Experts say the region is experiencing a table-top like effect in which cases remain relatively high instead of dramatically dropping. In a number of countries, the virus has begun spreading to areas that had previously registered relatively few cases.

“The behavior of the virus is different,” said Dr. Luis Jorge Hernández, a public health professor at the University of the Andes in Colombia. “It’s not big resurgences but new outbreaks.”

In Colombia, a six-month lockdown helped slow contagion and gave officials time to expand the number of ICU beds. While cases rose dramatically in Bogota, stretching hospital capacity, the city has managed to avoid the sorts of dire scenes seen elsewhere in the region of patients lined up outside hospitals, struggling to find a bed.

Nonetheless, the cost has been high: Nearly 30,000 people have died, including a number of medical workers like colleagues of Rodríguez. One count by a medical association estimates that nearly 200 physicians and other workers have died.

Rodríguez said his son spent over $100 buying him protective gear at the start of the pandemic. The pair still worry about getting sick. Both work at Bogota’s Kennedy Hospital, which is located in a sprawling working-class neighborhood. The area has the highest total number of cases anywhere in the bustling capital.

Dr. Camilo Rodríguez said he arrives to work in one uniform and changes into another when he treats COVID-19 patients. He lost a close friend and mentor to the virus and fears spreading it to his family.

As an extra precaution, he showers at the hospital before going home.

“Infecting myself would be infecting my family,” he said.

The path of the virus through Latin America is a consequence of weak public health systems, social factors like poverty and poor government decisions early on that resulted in flawed or limited testing and little contact tracing. Today the region is

Read more

U.S. reaches new one-day coronavirus case high of 83,000

Mannequins with face masks and designer clothing fill a window at a Diane Von Furstenberg store in New York City on September 8, 2020. Photo by John Angelillo/UPI | License Photo

Read more

DOJ Reaches $8 Billion Settlement With OxyContin Maker Purdue Pharma | Politics

Purdue Pharma, the manufacturer of the prescription painkiller OxyContin, reached an $8 billion settlement with the Department of Justice and will plead guilty to three federal criminal charges in connection with its role in America’s opioid crisis.

The Justice Department announced on Wednesday that it had reached a resolution in its investigation into individual shareholders from the Sackler family, who own the pharmaceutical company.

Purdue Pharma will plead guilty in a New Jersey federal court to three felony counts, including one count of dual-object conspiracy to defraud the United States and to violate the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, and two counts of conspiracy to violate the Federal Anti-Kickback Statute.

The deal does not release the company’s executives or owners from criminal liability and a criminal investigation is ongoing.

“The abuse and diversion of prescription opioids has contributed to a national tragedy of addiction and deaths, in addition to those caused by illicit street opioids,” Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen said in the announcement. “With criminal guilty pleas, a federal settlement of more than $8 billion, and the dissolution of a company and repurposing its assets entirely for the public’s benefit, the resolution in today’s announcement re-affirms that the Department of Justice will not relent in its multi-pronged efforts to combat the opioids crisis.”

According to the Justice Department, the resolution includes the largest penalties ever levied against a pharmaceutical company and includes a criminal fine of $3.544 billion, an additional $2 billion in criminal forfeiture and a $2.8 billion civil settlement.

Separately, the Sackler family has agreed to pay $225 million in damages.

A Rebirth Behind Bars

June 3, 2018 | Colonial Heights, Virginia | Patsy Tucker, 32, center, prays with her family during a weekly Sunday get-together at her mother's house in Colonial Heights, Va. June 3, 2018. 

Patsy started using heroin at 25, after a car accident and a prescription for opioids turned into a full-blown heroin addiction. Patsy was born to Diana McArthur, far left, when she was 16 years old. "We grew up together," Diana said. During Patsy's years of drug abuse, Diana said she couldn't imagine it ever ending. But just over two years ago, it did. Patsy found recovery when she was locked up in the Chesterfield County Jail. As she lay on the jail floor in the throws of heroin withdrawal, Sheriff Karl Leonard told her to get up - she was going to be the first female participant of HARP (Heroin Addiction Recovery Program), an in-jail, Narcotics Anonymous-styled recovery group. "The Sheriff saw in me what I couldn't see in myself," Patsy said.

Steve Miller, who became chairman of the company’s board in 2018, said in a press release that the company “deeply regrets and accepts responsibility for the misconduct detailed by the Department of Justice.”

The company filed for bankruptcy last year as it wades through thousands of civil lawsuits. As part of the resolution, Purdue Pharma would cease to operate in its current form and would instead transition to a public benefit company owned by a trust or similar entity. The new company would be operated under different ownership and “will work to provide for free or at cost millions of doses of lifesaving opioid addiction treatment and overdose reversal medicines,” the press release stated.

Source Article

Read more