Both Biden and Trump have questioned the other’s physical and mental fitness. Here’s what we know about their health.

President Trump and former vice president Joe Biden have both battled life-threatening illnesses at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, a facility they entered 32 years apart with uncertainty over whether they would return alive.



a person riding a motorcycle on a city street: Trump supporters gather outside Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Oct. 5 in Bethesda, Md., where the president was being treated for the coronavirus.


© Matt McClain/The Washington Post
Trump supporters gather outside Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Oct. 5 in Bethesda, Md., where the president was being treated for the coronavirus.

For Trump, his diagnosis with the novel coronavirus earlier this month was his most serious known brush with a fatal disease, and his rapidly dropping oxygen levels sparked grave concern among his top aides and doctors. For Biden, emergency surgery for two brain aneurysms in 1988 posed the risk of impaired cognitive capabilities, or worse. While he ultimately fully recovered, the situation was so dire at the time that a priest was brought in to deliver last rites.

Both episodes have become political fodder for opposing sides less than two weeks ahead of a presidential election in which the two septuagenarian candidates are competing for a chance to be the oldest sitting president in American history. More broadly, the health of each man has become a central component of an increasingly negative race in which questioning an opponent’s fitness for office has taken a personal turn.

Trump and his allies have regularly sought to raise doubts about Biden’s mental acuity, with the president telling Fox News in recent days that his rival could not complete his sentences.

“They said if you let him talk, he’ll lose his chain of thought because he’s gonzo,” Trump said during a 50-minute interview with the network in the lead-up to Thursday’s presidential debate. “There were a lot of people that say let him talk because he loses his train . . . He loses his mind, frankly.”

Trump’s opponents have openly questioned his mental wellness, with Biden campaign officials mocking him for musing about the medical efficacy of injecting disinfectant and for celebrating his ability to recite five simple words in order during a cognitive test.

Trump’s battle with the coronavirus highlighted his preexisting physical challenges. The Biden campaign has run ads showing Trump struggling to walk down a ramp.

Both candidates have not been fully transparent about their health status, even as they claim to be in excellent shape. They have released information from doctors declaring them strong and energetic, while downplaying or concealing information that may undercut those descriptions. Neither has allowed access to their complete medical records.

Trump has been especially secretive, concealing information about his coronavirus infection and treatment, and providing contradictory answers about why he made a separate unplanned visit to Walter Reed last November.

For Trump, an overweight 74-year-old and recent survivor of covid-19, and Biden, a 77-year-old who today has a few minor medical conditions, proving to voters that they are fit for the job of president is a particularly critical task in the frantic final days of the race.

The challenge has been made more difficult as the two sides

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Convalescent plasma questioned as coronavirus treatment in India: report

Government officials in India are contemplating dropping plasma from coronavirus therapies after a study found it ineffective, per multiple reports.

Dr. Balram Bhargava, chief of the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), said the forthcoming study in the British Medical Journal revealed plasma didn’t lower deaths or prevent progression to severe disease among 464 patients, per Times of India.

Plasma from recovered COVID-19 cases is transfused to critically ill COVID-19 patients, with the hope that the antibodies will help the patient fight or neutralize the disease. 

“We have discussed this in the national task force and are discussing further now with the joint monitoring group that this [plasma therapy] may be deleted from the national guidelines,” Bhargava said, per the outlet. “That discussion is ongoing and more or less we are reaching towards that.” 

Plasma from recovered COVID-19 cases is transfused to critically ill COVID-19 patients, with the hope that the antibodies will help the patient fight or neutralize the disease. (iStock)

Plasma from recovered COVID-19 cases is transfused to critically ill COVID-19 patients, with the hope that the antibodies will help the patient fight or neutralize the disease. (iStock)

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However, others still have hope.

Satyendar Jain, Delhi health minister, on Wednesday reportedly discussed 2,000 patients who improved from the therapy, touting plasma for saving his own life, one outlet wrote.

“Even America has acknowledged its benefit,” Jain said, per The Economic Times. “Delhi in a way is a pioneer in it and plasma therapy benefits have been seen. You should go and ask family members of those patients who were administered the plasma therapy,” he said.

President Trump announced FDA emergency approval for plasma in August, though top experts, namely Dr. Anthony Fauci and Dr. Francis Collins, voiced concerns over inadequate evidence shortly before the approval which temporarily paused the process. 

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“This is a powerful therapy that transfuses very, very strong antibodies from the blood of recovered patients to help treat patients battling a current infection,” Trump had said, adding that the authorization would “expand access to this treatment.”

On its webpage, the FDA notes a “statistically significant 37% reduction in mortality in those treated with high titer convalescent plasma,” or in simpler terms, plasma with higher levels of antibodies.

A study by the Mayo Clinic of over 35,000 patients found that plasma with high antibody levels “significantly reduced mortality” in hospitalized COVID-19 patients, 52% of whom were in intensive care.

When the treatment was administered early (within three days), there were fewer deaths.

Fox News Bradford Betz contributed to this article.

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