Dentist’s Therapy Dog Is So Proud When He Does A Good Job

At a Zanesville, Ohio, dental practice, one member of the staff makes people actually look forward to their appointments. 

A few days a week, a 1-year-old Labradoodle named Dwight goes to work with his mom, a dental hygenist, at Sulens Dental Studio. The mild-tempered pup greets anxious patients and helps take their mind off their fears. 

Dwight the therapy dog comforts a patient
Jensen McVey

Dwight began his training as a therapy dog at 12 weeks old and continues to practice with trainers twice a week at his puppy school and the dental office. But from the moment his mom brought him home, she knew he’d be perfect for the job.

“Dwight was definitely born to be a therapy dog,” Jensen McVey, Dwight’s trainer, told The Dodo. “He is extremely sweet and has never met a stranger!”

Therapy dog helps out at dentist's office
Jensen McVey

“Dwight can definitely get excited and play when the time calls for it but otherwise he is a calm cuddle bug,” he added. “Dwight is so much fun to work with and every one of my employees loves working with him and loves seeing him come in.”

Jensen McVey

According to one study, as many as 36 percent of people suffer from dental fear. But Dwight is doing everything he can to help change people’s perception of sitting in the dentist’s chair. Therapy dogs can positively change people’s mood and anxiety — even reducing their perception of pain.

Dwight’s job starts as soon as the patient walks in. He runs to greet them at the door with a big smile and a wagging tail. If the patient needs a little extra help, Dwight is happy to comfort them during their cleaning or procedure.

Jensen McVey

“He helps to create a fun experience for scared children coming in and provides overall comfort for those in the office,” McVey said. “He is also trained to gently lay and apply pressure for nervous patients or to gently place his paws up so people can pet him and take their mind off of being at the dentist.”

Jensen McVey

For all his hard work, Dwight gets paid in treats and a monthly BarkBox. But the pup is happiest when he can spend time with his dental family — helping people feel a little bit better every day.

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‘Dentist Dog’ Is So Proud When He Does A Good Job



a dog wearing a costume



At a Zanesville, Ohio, dental practice, one member of the staff makes people actually look forward to their appointments. 

A few days a week, a 1-year-old Labradoodle named Dwight goes to work with his mom, a dental hygenist, at Sulens Dental Studio. The mild-tempered pup greets anxious patients and helps take their mind off their fears. 


a dog holding a stuffed animal


© Jensen McVey



Dwight began his training as a therapy dog at 12 weeks old and continues to practice with trainers twice a week at his puppy school and the dental office. But from the moment his mom brought him home, she knew he’d be perfect for the job.

“Dwight was definitely born to be a therapy dog,” Jensen McVey, Dwight’s trainer, told The Dodo. “He is extremely sweet and has never met a stranger!”




© Jensen McVey



“Dwight can definitely get excited and play when the time calls for it but otherwise he is a calm cuddle bug,” he added. “Dwight is so much fun to work with and every one of my employees loves working with him and loves seeing him come in.”


a person holding a dog


© Jensen McVey



According to one study, as many as 36 percent of people suffer from dental fear. But Dwight is doing everything he can to help change people’s perception of sitting in the dentist’s chair. Therapy dogs can positively change people’s mood and anxiety — even reducing their perception of pain.

Dwight’s job starts as soon as the patient walks in. He runs to greet them at the door with a big smile and a wagging tail. If the patient needs a little extra help, Dwight is happy to comfort them during their cleaning or procedure.


a person holding a dog


© Jensen McVey



“He helps to create a fun experience for scared children coming in and provides overall comfort for those in the office,” McVey said. “He is also trained to gently lay and apply pressure for nervous patients or to gently place his paws up so people can pet him and take their mind off of being at the dentist.”


a dog sitting on a table


© Jensen McVey



For all his hard work, Dwight gets paid in treats and a monthly BarkBox. But the pup is happiest when he can spend time with his dental family — helping people feel a little bit better every day.

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Brittany Maynard’s Husband Is ‘Proud’ Of Her Death-With-Dignity Legacy

Brittany Maynard’s husband posted a heartfelt Facebook message on the sixth anniversary of her death saying he’s “immensely proud of her legacy.”

Maynard died in 2014 after she ended her own life due to a battle with brain cancer in which was given only six months to live. The 29-year-old had stage 4 glioblastoma, which is a malignant brain tumor. 

Her husband, Dan Diaz, took to Facebook to celebrate the anniversary of her death and to tell the world how proud he was of her and what she left behind. 

“Six years ago today, (November 1st) I held Brittany in my arms as she died, gently.  Her dying process was peaceful only because she took that control back from the brain tumor.  (Brittany would not allow the cancer’s worsening symptoms to torture her to death),” he wrote. 

Maynard was a supporter and advocate for the right-to-die movement, according to PEOPLE. Her experience went hand-in-hand with the death-with-dignity laws in parts of the country, which allowed terminally ill patients to choose to end their lives before their incurrable diseases can. 

The one thing Maynard didn’t want is for her brain tumor to control her and control when she was going to die, so she took it into her own hands. 

“My glioblastoma is going to kill me and that’s out of my control. I’ve discussed with many experts how I would die from it and it’s a terrible, terrible way to die. So being able to choose to go with dignity is less terrifying,” she explained to PEOPLE when she received her diagnosis. 

Maynard is credited with changing the way the country looks at the death-with-dignity laws after she passed. As of 2020, nine states and Washington D.C. allow this law to be practiced. When Maynard was alive, it was only legal in four states. 

She decided to end her life in her Oregan home, after moving there in 2014, with the help of doctors who prescribed her a dose of barbiturates that would be fatal. 

Diaz ended the Facebook post saying, “Thank you Brittany, for your determination to make a difference for the rest of us and raising your voice to demand change. I  miss you deeply.”

Brittany Maynard Brittany Maynard was diagnosed with brain cancer at the age of 29. Photo: Compassion & Choices/YouTube

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Jeff Asher: Amid national resurgence of coronavirus, Louisiana can be proud of ‘fragile’ progress | Coronavirus

In my last column, I made what I might call the “cautiously pessimistic” forecast for COVID-19 in Louisiana over the next few weeks/months. But, as I said in that piece, “the evidence is not particularly strong just yet, meaning there is plenty of uncertainty about whether we are actually seeing increasing infections, where they’re occurring, and how bad things could get.”

Today let’s look at the relatively optimistic present, where things in Louisiana are about as good as they have been — while still being in a deadly global pandemic — since early March.

In much of America right now, there is ample evidence that things are getting bad. There were nearly 70,000 new cases reported nationally on Oct. 16, the most since July, and cases are rising faster than tests nationally.



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Wisconsin reported over 4,000 new cases on Oct. 16 with 28% of tests coming back positive, indicating that the number of infections is significantly higher than even that incredible number of known new cases. The Dakotas are seeing some of the highest rates of new cases in the country.

It is not just the U.S. either. Countries across Europe are implementing new restrictions in the face of a new surge.

But so far, Louisiana has been spared the COVID spike that is gripping much of the country.

So far.

A partial explanation may be that Louisiana was arguably the only state in the country to have an initial wave in March and a second wave in June/July. Louisiana’s re-opening has also been cautious and staggered, which has helped to prevent outbreaks over a month after the state entered Phase 3.



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‘We know very little about what the virus will be doing four months from now’

Fewer than 5% of tests reported statewide have come back positive on 13 of the first 14 days of October where data was reported. The data has been even better in Orleans Parish, where tests have come back positive at a rate of 2.5% or less on all 14 days.

Florida, by contrast, fully re-opened restaurants, bars, and gyms, among other businesses, on Sept. 28 despite still logging around 100 deaths per day and a positivity rate of over 10%, and the state is already seeing increasing cases and a climbing positive test rate.

Meanwhile, the evidence of increasing COVID in Louisiana that I wrote about last time has not really panned out. COVID-related hospitalizations are up slightly from where they were in early October, but they have been relatively steady for much of the last three weeks. And Google searches for COVID symptoms looked like they were increasing in early October, but that trend seems less clear now than it did a week or two ago.

The progress that Louisiana has made is real, but it is also fragile.

Data from Tulane and LSU

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