Oxford Vaccine Demonstrates 70% Protection Against SARS-CoV-2

The Sars-CoV-2 vaccine developed by the University of Oxford demonstrated average efficacy of 70.4%, according to results of clinical trials.

The interim analysis of phase 2/3 trials in the UK and Brazil found efficacy of 62% following two full doses given at least one month apart.

However, vaccine efficacy was 90% when ChAdOx1 nCoV-19, also known as AZD1222, was given to a subset of participants as a half dose, followed by a full dose at least one month later.

No hospitalisations or severe cases of the disease were reported in participants who received the vaccine, Oxford’s partner AstraZeneca said in a press release this morning.

The data also suggested a half dose and full dose regime could help to prevent transmission of the virus, according to a press release from the University of Oxford.

Sarah Gilbert, professor of vaccinology at Oxford, said: “The announcement today takes us another step closer to the time when we can use vaccines to bring an end to the devastation caused by SARS-CoV-2.”

The announcement follows promising interim data from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, which recently demonstrated protection of around 95% against developing COVID-19 with their messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines

However, the Oxford vaccine is cheaper to produce, and unlike the other vaccines that require a demanding cold chain storage, can be kept at standard refrigerator temperatures of between 2C and 8C.

‘Exciting’ News

Prof Andrew Pollard, director of the Oxford Vaccine Group, said: “These findings show that we have an effective vaccine that will save many lives.

Excitingly, we’ve found that one of our dosing regimens may be around 90% effective and if this dosing regime is used, more people could be vaccinated with planned vaccine supply.”

Asked why giving a half dose followed by a full dose appeared to be more effective, Prof Pollard told a briefing hosted by the Science Media Centre: “We think that by giving a smaller first dose that we’re priming the immune system differently, we’re setting it up better to respond.”

He added: “What we don’t know at this moment is whether that difference is in the quality or the quantity of the immune response, and that’s something we are doing to be digging into.”

Pascal Soriot, AstraZeneca’s chief executive Officer, said using a halved first dose and a standard second dose would mean “we can vaccinate more people, faster”.

AstraZeneca Prepares to Seek Regulatory Approval

The company said it would immediately prepare regulatory submission of the data to authorities around the world.

Trial results will be submitted to a scientific journal for peer review.

The pooled analysis included data from the COV002 Phase 2/3 trial in the UK and COV003 phase 3 trial in Brazil, and involved more than 23,000 participants.

Dr Zania Stamataki, viral immunologist at the University of Birmingham, commented: ” People will be tempted to compare efficacy between the different vaccines but we must remember that these are early data designed to achieve approval. Efficacy is not the same as effectiveness and the early numbers

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Resverlogix Reports Filing of New Intellectual Property on Key Renal Protection and Glucose Control Markers

Significantly Strengthens Intellectual Property Portfolio and Apabetalone’s Commercial Runway Position Through 2040

BETonMACE Results Show Significant Improvement of Key Markers of Diabetes and Renal Function in the Combination of Apabetalone and SGLT2 inhibitors

CALGARY, Alberta, Nov. 02, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Resverlogix Corp. (“Resverlogix” or the “Company”) (TSX: RVX) is pleased to announce today highly significant findings on synergy on improved renal function, as measured by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and glucose control, as measured by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), when apabetalone is combined with sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, a leading oral anti-diabetic therapy class. These unexpected findings in the BETonMACE Phase 3 trial resulted in the filing of two additional provisional patent applications, further strengthening Resverlogix’s intellectual property portfolio.

The combination of apabetalone and the SGLT2 inhibitors, in addition to standard of care medicines, resulted in a significant improvement of key renal function marker eGFR compared to SGLT2 inhibitors and placebo (p=0.05). Additionally, a significant reduction of plasma Hb1Ac was also observed in patients receiving the combination of apabetalone and the SGLT2 inhibitors, on top of standard of care treatment, compared to placebo (p<0.001). Details of these findings are planned to be submitted to a leading peer review journal in the near future.

“The robust safety and efficacy demonstrated by the combination of apabetalone and SGLT2 inhibitors greatly assists us in our strategic partnership discussions and significantly enhances our intellectual property portfolio and commercial runway position through 2040,” stated Donald McCaffrey, President and CEO. “These important findings – coupled with the significant MACE reduction effects previously highlighted for this patient group – positions the combination of apabetalone and SGLT2 inhibition as a truly novel approach in the treatment for millions of high-risk diabetes and CKD patients worldwide.”

“Plasma eGFR and Hb1Ac are critical markers used to evaluate renal function and glucose control in high-risk patients with kidney disease and diabetes,” stated Kenneth Lebioda, Senior Vice President of Business & Corporate Development. “Control of these markers play a key role in CVD risk reduction as observed in the BETonMACE study, including heart attack, heart failure and CVD death in these patients. These novel and unexpected findings are now patent protected and allow for Resverlogix to explore additional important indications for the combination of apabetalone and SGLT2 inhibitors with an accelerated path to commercialization.”

About eGFR and CKD

According to the National Kidney Foundation, renal function, as measured by eGFR is the strongest non-invasive way to assess renal function and the stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in patients. Using a patient’s blood creatinine level, age, body size and gender, physicians can determine the stage of CKD and the optimal treatment plan to improve the likelihood of reducing kidney disease and associated-disorders progression. In the Global Burden of Disease Study, CKD is estimated to affect nearly 700 million people worldwide, many of them still undiagnosed. CKD and worsening renal function impact several other high-risk patient disease groups, and serves as a comorbidity for diabetes, while also indirectly

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Long-term problems in younger low-risk COVID-19 patients; flu shot may offer some protection

By Nancy Lapid



a man standing in a room: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in France


© Reuters/Pascal Rossignol
The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in France

(Reuters) – The following is a roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus.

Long-term health problems seen in low-risk COVID-19 patients

Young, healthy adults with COVID-19 who do not require hospitalization are still at risk for long-term health problems, Oxford University researchers found. They studied 201 recovering UK patients with an average age of 44, more than 90% of whom did not have risk factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or heart disease. Only 18% had been sick enough to be hospitalized. At an average of 140 days after their symptoms began, 98% were still fatigued, 92% had heart and lung symptoms, 88% had muscle aches, 87% had breathlessness, 83% headaches, and 73% gastrointestinal symptoms. Organ damage was more common among those who had been hospitalized. But it was not limited to that group as 66% of the patients had impairment of at least one organ. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans showed mild damage to lungs in 33%, heart in 32%, pancreas in 17%, kidneys in 12%, liver in 10% and spleen in 6%. The researchers say their study, posted on Friday on medRxiv ahead of peer review, cannot prove the virus caused these later issues. But it does suggest long-term monitoring of organ function will be necessary even in relatively low-risk patients. (https://bit.ly/2IAR83N)

Flu shot may help protect against COVID-19

Flu vaccines may help the body defend itself against COVID-19, according to a Dutch study that found hospital workers who got a flu shot last winter were less likely to become infected with the new coronavirus. In test tube experiments, the researchers saw that last winter’s flu vaccine could prime healthy cells to respond more effectively not just to the flu, but also to the new coronavirus. When they analyzed COVID-19 rates among staff at their hospital, they found the number of infections was 39% lower among those who had gotten a flu vaccine. “These data, combined with similar recent independent reports, argue for a possible beneficial effect of influenza vaccination against both influenza and COVID-19,” the researchers say. “This could mean that the flu vaccine could offer partial protection against both infections this winter.” They posted their report on medRxiv on Friday ahead of peer review. “We thought it was important to publish these results already because the flu shot is made available to a large group of people,” study leader Mihai Netea of Radboud University Medical Center said in a news release. (https://bit.ly/35bqEgV)

Pandemic increases need for strength training by elderly

Older people “urgently” need to be doing resistance exercises, also known as strength training, during the pandemic, to counteract the effects of physical inactivity and to make sure they retain at least the same level of muscle function they had prior to lockdowns and stay-at-home orders, doctors advise. Social distancing measures

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Montco Had 4 Percent Of PA’s Protection From Abuse Orders In 2019

MONTGOMERY COUNTY, PA — Montgomery County had one of the largest percentages of protection from abuse orders granted in Pennsylvania in 2019.

That’s according to newly released statistics from the Administrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts, which analyzed nearly 40,000 different petitions. PFAs are civil orders issued by the state to protect victims or potential victims of domestic violence, usually from a partner or family member.

>>Domestic Violence Rises In Montco: Where To Turn If You Need Help

Montgomery County trailed only Philadelphia (22 percent), Allegheny (9 percent), and Delaware (5 percent) in the largest share of PFAs issued in 2019.

The latest statistics come as Montgomery County sees a rise in domestic violence cases in 2020 since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. Isolation and quarantine have exacerbated underlying issues and caused increased stress in many cases, officials say. In the early months of the outbreak, cases of reported domestic violence increased by 9 percent in the county.

There’s also been a rise in relationship-related homicides in the county in 2020. They account for nine of 2020’s 14 homicides, per the District Attorney’s Office.

The county kept the courts working through the pandemic so that residents could continue to file PFAs.

PFAs can require that a domestic abuser have no contact with the victim or children. They can also order the abuser to leave the home where the abuse is taking place, or pay fines related to the abuse.

Statewide, the total number of PFAs filed increased to 39,132 in 2019. It’s a number that’s trickled steadily upwards since 2015, when 37,563 orders were filed.

There are numerous other resources available for victims in Montgomery County:

Laurel House

  • Open 24/7

  • Provides immediate, safe shelter for victims and children of victims

  • Provides counseling via Telehealth

  • Call 800-642-3150

  • Website

Women’s Center of Montgomery County

  • Open 24/7

  • Partners with law enforcement to provide counseling, relocation assistance, help with protection from abuse orders, and other advocacy to victims

  • Call 800-773-2424

  • Website

Victim Services Center

  • Open 24/7

  • Offers crisis counseling, medical exam support, help with protection from abuse orders, and more

  • Provides counseling via Telehealth

  • Call 888-521-0983

  • Website

Mission Kids Child Advocacy Center

  • Mental health treatment, resource referrals, medical care

  • Trauma therapy offered through Telehealth

  • Open Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

  • Call 484-687-2990

  • Website

This article originally appeared on the Norristown Patch

Source Article

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