The One Home Gym Upgrade a Fitness Pro Says You Need Happens To Be *Seriously* Discounted

We’ve all had those days when it was hard to trek up the stairs or even walk due to muscle soreness and tightness, and sometimes foam rolling and stretching just doesn’t cut it. If you need to up the ante on your recovery routine, The Theragun Elite ($399) will loosen your tightest knots. And in honor of Black Friday, you can score it for $100 off its usual price.

The tool acts as an in-home percussive therapy treatment, and has become a cult-fave among gym-goers for its ability to relieve tension. It uses targeted, rapid pulses, which helps to induce blood flow to your soft tissues. As a result, you get less muscle tightness and enhanced mobility. According to research, body percussion can lead to better physical and mental health, and one study found that it can decrease the levels of lactic acid in your muscles for up to 48 hours after a workout. “Vibrational therapy can help with pain, muscle soreness or tightness, and recovery,” Lauren Lobert, DPT and owner of APEX Physical Therapy previously told Well+Good. “It can be an inexpensive alternative to massage to help maintain performance by working out knows and preventing the build-up of lactic acid in the muscles.”



a person standing in front of a curtain: Screen Shot 2020-11-23 at 2.30.40 PM


© Photo: Therabody
Screen Shot 2020-11-23 at 2.30.40 PM

While all of Therabody’s devices will give your muscles this sort much-needed massage (in two minutes flat, by the way), the Elite has become a fan favorite for a number of reasons. It’s the quietest device in the brand’s collection, and its slender design allows you to take it with you no matter where you are, making it the ultimate partner for every workout. It features an OLED screen and wireless charging capabilities (yay for no cords!), and you can pair it with the Therabody app for a more personalized experience. Thanks to an ergonomic, multi-grip handle, the device allows you to reach all of those hard-to-reach muscle knots, and you can choose between five different speeds to ensure you’re getting exactly the treatment you need. So what are you waiting for? Go get your percussive buddy (for a seriously discounted price) and say goodbye to muscle soreness once and for all.

Shop now: Theragun Elite, $299 ($399 Value)



icon: Theragun Elite


© Photo: Therabody
Theragun Elite

Shop now: Theragun Elite, $299 ($399 value)

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Whoop, maker of the fitness tracker that pro athletes love, is now valued at $1.2 billion

  • Whoop has closed a $100 million Series E Financing round, valuing the company at $1.2 billion.
  • Several professional athletes including Patrick Mahomes and Rory McIlroy are investors in the company
  • Whoop has seen a surge in business during the coronavirus pandemic as it has been an effective tool for some of its users in noticing early onset Covid symptoms.



Patrick Mahomes holding a frisbee: Patrick Mahomes is an investor in Whoop's latest round of funding.


© Provided by CNBC
Patrick Mahomes is an investor in Whoop’s latest round of funding.

Some of the biggest names in sports are investing in the wearable company Whoop amid a global pandemic.

The fitness tracking company announced Wednesday it closed a $100 million financing round, valuing it at $1.2 billion. 

The latest round of investors includes Super Bowl MVP Patrick Mahomes, champion golfers Rory McIlroy and

PGA Tour golfer Justin Thomas on playing amid coronavirus

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Arizona Cardinals wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald and two-time NBA Finals MVP Kevin Durant (via his business venture ThirtyFive Ventures).

Whoop makes fitness trackers that can monitor vitals like movement, sleep and workouts. It’s been the fitness tracker of choice for a number of recognizable pro athletes, and has been used to help monitor potential symptoms of Covid-19 as sports came back after play was suspended due to the pandemic in the spring.

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“I’ve always loved Whoop the product, but I learned that Whoop the business was just as good. I’m proud to be investing again in this round of financing and very excited about the company’s prospects,” McIlroy said in a statement. The four-time Majors Champion also serves as a global ambassador to Whoop.

The funding round was led by venture capital firm IVP, which will get a board seat with Whoop. Other participating investors include SoftBank Vision Fund 2, Accomplice, Two Sigma Ventures, Collaborative Fund, Thursday Ventures, Nextview Ventures, Promus Ventures, Cavu Ventures and D20 Capital.

“A lot of the capital will go towards investing in membership, the overall experience, software, analytics and hardware,” Will Ahmed, Whoop CEO said in an interview with CNBC. “It’s really about bolstering the coaching aspect of Whoop. We aspire to be a 24/7 life coach to tell you what you need to do to improve.”

The Boston-based sports wearable company got its start in 2012 and now has more than 330 employees after a surge of recent hires. Ahmed said the company has hired 200 new employees in 2020.

The company wouldn’t provide revenue numbers but said its subscribers have been growing quickly over the last 12 months due to an increased interest in health during the pandemic. Whoop has raised more than $200 million in funding to date.

“Whoop has built best-in-class wearable technology and an aspirational brand that have propelled the company to an impressive period of hypergrowth,” Eric Liaw, General Partner at IVP, said in a statement.

Ahmed said Whoop members range from professional athletes, Fortune 500 CEOs and fitness enthusiasts. The nylon band equipped with sensors is designed to gather data to measure everything from exertion levels

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Apple Watch Series 6 Beats Garmin’s Fenix 6 Pro For Fitness Tracking In One Important Way

A Garmin runner’s watch like the Fenix 6 Pro Solar is an obvious choice if you want a wearable to track runs, walks and bike rides. But does it really do the job better than an Apple Watch Series 6?

I decided to test these watches’ heart rate sensors in the context of a run. An Apple Watch on one wrist, a Garmin Fenix 6 Pro Solar on the other, and a Wahoo Tickr HR strap around the chest, acting as a control for this not-quite-scientific test.

Here are the results over a roughly 7km run, one dotted with breaks and slow-downs to see how the trackers cope with sharp changes in effort. The Garmin is the red line, the Apple Watch Series 6 the blue line and the Wahoo Tickr the green.

The most obvious fault here is the Wahoo Tickr chest strap’s. Or, to be fair, my own. Its readings are all patchy and intermittent at the first increase in pace, most likely because the strap wasn’t quite tight enough to start.

However, it is otherwise the most accurate of the three. And I’ve left the first few minutes of tracking in this graph to highlight the main wearable takeaway.

The Apple Watch Series 6 starts off from a much better position than the Garmin Fenix 6 Pro, whose results are too high. This is a common observation of Garmins and wearables in general: their HR tracking algorithms tend to assume your heart rate will be far above your resting rate as soon as you begin tracking an exercise.

If you start the session as you warm-up, it will not be. The Apple Watch Series 6’s readings are very accurate from the first seconds onwards.

This issue with lower heart rate readings continues throughout the run. In each decrease in pace, or outright stop in the case of the deepest dip in the graph, the Apple Watch Series 6 tightly matches the lowest reading recorded by the Wahoo Tickr chest strap. But the Garmin’s are all routinely slightly higher.

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The Garmin Fenix 6 Pro shows significantly higher readings during the cool-down too, aside from an aberrant blip at the end where the recorded rate drops, and then compensates with an artificially high peak.

Apple’s Watch Series 6 only failed to keep up, slightly, with the Tickr when I went from running to sitting on a bench, to cause a very steep fall in heart rate. The Apple and Garmin’s falls are similarly cliff-like, but not as steep as the Tickr’s.

The Apple Watch Series 6’s heart rate hardware is superb, obviating the need for a chest strap, for most people. There is another side to this story, though.

To

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