Rise in nighttime blood pressure increases heart disease risk, study finds

Nov. 2 (UPI) — People who have high blood pressure at night are at increased risk for heart disease, even if their blood pressure is within normal ranges during the day, according to a study published Monday by the journal Circulation.

A nighttime systolic blood pressure — the “top” number — that is 20 millimeters of mercury — or mm. Hg, the unit of measure for blood pressure — above daytime readings raises a person’s risk for heart disease by 18%, the data showed.

That same rise in nighttime blood pressure also increases a person’s risk for heart failure by 25%, the researchers said.

“Nighttime blood pressure is increasingly being recognized as a predictor of cardiovascular risk,” study co-author Dr. Kazuomi Kario said in a statement.

“This study provides much more in-depth information about the cardiovascular risk associated with high nighttime blood pressure,” said Kario, a professor of cardiovascular medicine at Jichi Medical University in Japan.

Nearly half of all adults in the United States — or 108 million people — have high blood pressure, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates.

Research suggests that up to 40% of people experience rises in systolic blood pressure at night, whether or not their blood pressure is considered normal or healthy — between 90 mm. Hg and 120 mm. Hg — during the day.

For this study, researchers measured daytime and nighttime systolic blood pressure in 6,359 adults from across Japan between 2009 and 2017, using an at-home, wearable, ambulatory monitor.

Blood pressure was recorded during daily activities and sleep for at least 24-hours at a time, and device data were periodically downloaded at a healthcare clinic, the researchers said.

Nearly half of the study participants were male, and more than half were aged 65 years and older, according to the researchers.

All of the study participants had at least one risk factor for heart disease — although none had been diagnosed with it — and 75% of them were taking blood pressure medications when the study began, the researchers said.

The study participants were instructed to rest or sleep during nighttime hours and maintain their usual daytime activities, and they recorded their daily activities and sleep and wake times in a diary.

Nearly every participant recorded 20 daytime and seven nighttime automated blood pressure measurements.

By the end of the study period, participants experienced a total of 306 cardiovascular events, including 119 strokes, 99 diagnoses of coronary artery disease and 88 diagnoses of heart failure.

Those with a disrupted circadian blood pressure rhythm — or higher blood pressure at night than during the day — had a 48% higher risk for heart disease and were nearly three times as likely to experience heart failure, the data showed.

Circadian rhythms are the body’s natural, internal process that regulates a person’s sleep-wake cycle and repeats with each rotation of the Earth, or roughly every 24 hours, according to the American Heart Association.

Blood pressure typically fluctuates with a pattern that follows the

Read more

Beware of Blood Pressure Changes at Night | Health News

By Serena Gordon HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

MONDAY, Nov. 2, 2020 (HealthDay News) — If your blood pressure changes a lot overnight — either rising or falling — you may have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke, a new study from Japan reports.

When systolic blood pressure (the top number) jumps up by 20 mm/Hg or more during the night, the risk of heart disease and stroke goes up by 18% and the risk of heart failure increases by 25%.

If people consistently had higher blood pressure readings at night, but normal readings during the day, the risk of heart failure more than doubled. The researchers, writing in the journal Circulation, dubbed this a “riser pattern.”

On the other hand, for people with a drop in blood pressure of more than 20%, the study team noted a more than twice the risk of stroke. They called this group “extreme dippers.”

“Nighttime blood pressure is increasingly being recognized as a predictor of cardiovascular risk,” study lead author Dr. Kazuomi Kario said in a journal news release. He’s chair of cardiovascular medicine at the Jichi Medical University in Tochigi, Japan.

Dr. Raymond Townsend, an expert volunteer for the American Heart Association, said blood pressure is typically higher in the morning and lower in the afternoon and evening.

Compared to the overall daytime blood pressure pattern, “blood pressure is generally about 10% to 20% lower during sleep. Sleep time offers a relatively pure look at blood pressure. Most factors that influence blood pressure are minimized during sleep,” he explained.

But health care professionals usually rely on in-office blood pressure measurements taken during the day to diagnose high blood pressure and to figure out whether or not a blood pressure medication is working or not, the researchers said. These daytime measurements may miss high blood pressure that happens at night. They can also miss big dips in blood pressure.

Dr. John Osborne, director of cardiology at State of the Heart Cardiology in Dallas, said, “When we measure blood pressure in the office, we’re mainly getting daytime blood pressure. Seeing what happens at night can give us a much deeper insight.”

Osborne said this study “is another signal that we really need to incorporate ambulatory blood pressure monitoring into the evaluation of high blood pressure. If we only see blood pressure during the day, it dramatically reduces our ability to assess overall risk.”

Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring allows doctors to see blood pressure levels over a 24-hour period, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians. Patients are fitted with a blood pressure cuff and sent home with a portable monitor that automatically inflates at regular intervals. The machine also records each blood pressure reading it takes in a day.

The current study included more than 6,300 Japanese adults. Their average age was 69. Almost half were men, and more than three-quarters were on blood pressure lowering medications. The average follow-up time was four years.

During the study, volunteers had 20 daytime and

Read more

Nearly 50,000 hospitalized with Covid-19 as experts warn of growing health care pressure

The fall surge has left nearly 50,000 people hospitalized across the US due to Covid-19, and experts say the strain health care systems are under could soon get worse.



a person in a blue blanket: HOUSTON, TX - OCTOBER 31: A medical staff member grabs a hand of a patient to reposition the bed in the COVID-19 intensive care unit (ICU) at the United Memorial Medical Center (UMMC) on October 31, 2020 in Houston, Texas. According to reports, Texas has reached over 916,000 cases, including over 18,000 deaths. (Photo by Go Nakamura/Getty Images)


© Go Nakamura/Getty Images
HOUSTON, TX – OCTOBER 31: A medical staff member grabs a hand of a patient to reposition the bed in the COVID-19 intensive care unit (ICU) at the United Memorial Medical Center (UMMC) on October 31, 2020 in Houston, Texas. According to reports, Texas has reached over 916,000 cases, including over 18,000 deaths. (Photo by Go Nakamura/Getty Images)

Hospitalizations were on the rise in 47 states last month, according to the Covid Tracking Project, and a total of 47,502 people were hospitalized as of Sunday. The rates come alongside a surge of cases that made October a record setting month for coronavirus infections in the US.

Loading...

Load Error

The US recorded its highest number of new cases on Friday with a reported 99,321, the record for any nation in the world. And experts have said that the impacts will likely continue to get worse as colder months drive up infections.

“We’re right at the beginning of what looks like exponential growth in a lot of states,” Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration, said on CBS’s “Face the Nation” on Sunday. “This is very worrisome as we head into the winter.”

Gottlieb expects Thanksgiving to be an inflection point, and from there he said the hospital system is going to be facing pressure similar to the early spikes — when hospitals around the country were reaching capacity and health care workers were stretched thin.

Dr. Christopher Murray, director of the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, said hospitalizations are the best measure of how the nation is faring against the pandemic and are often an indicator of how the number of deaths will trend.

The seven-day average for new cases currently is more than 81,300 — higher than any other time in the pandemic. The surge has brought cases to more than 9.2 million in the US since the pandemic began, and 230,996 people have died, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

Coronavirus accelerating in states

Covid-19 spread and hospitalizations have reached staggering levels across states.

This week, there were more new coronavirus cases in Kentucky than any other week since the pandemic began, Gov. Andy Beshear said in a statement Sunday.

“I know we’re tired, but if we do not get the spread of this disease under control, we risk a darker, more deadly period this winter than we ever experienced in the spring,” Beshear said.

Illinois is working to manage the virus by putting the entire state under resurgence mitigation measures, Gov. J.B. Pritzker and the Illinois Department of Public Health said Sunday. The state reported nearly 7,000 new cases on Sunday.

“As cases, hospitalizations and deaths are rising across our state, across the Midwest and across the nation, we have to act responsibly and collectively

Read more

Social Isolation Tied to High Blood Pressure in Women

Women who are socially isolated have an increased risk for high blood pressure, researchers report. But men, not so much.

Scientists used data on 28,238 Canadian men and women aged 45 to 85 who are participating in a large continuing study on aging.

The researchers found that compared with married women, single women had a 28 percent higher risk of hypertension, divorced women a 21 percent higher risk, and widowed women a 33 percent higher risk.

Social connections were also significant. Compared with the one-quarter of women with the largest social networks — which ranged from 220 to 573 people — those in the lowest one-quarter, with fewer than 85 connections, were 15 percent more likely to have high blood pressure.

The associations were different, and generally weaker, in men. Men who lived alone had a lower risk of hypertension than men with partners, but the size of men’s social networks, or their participation in social activity, was not significantly associated with high blood pressure.

The study, in the Journal of Hypertension, controlled for many factors that affect blood pressure, including age, education, smoking, alcohol use and depression.

The senior author, Annalijn I. Conklin, an assistant professor at the University of British Columbia, said that the most important finding is that social ties seem to be more meaningful for women than for men. “Social ties matter for cardiovascular health,” she said, “and they matter more for women.”

Source Article

Read more

Nearly 50,000 hospitalized with Covid-19 as experts warn of growing healthcare pressure

The fall surge has left nearly 50,000 people hospitalized across the US due to Covid-19, and experts say the strain healthcare systems are under could soon get worse.



a person in a blue blanket: HOUSTON, TX - OCTOBER 31: A medical staff member grabs a hand of a patient to reposition the bed in the COVID-19 intensive care unit (ICU) at the United Memorial Medical Center (UMMC) on October 31, 2020 in Houston, Texas. According to reports, Texas has reached over 916,000 cases, including over 18,000 deaths. (Photo by Go Nakamura/Getty Images)


© Go Nakamura/Getty Images
HOUSTON, TX – OCTOBER 31: A medical staff member grabs a hand of a patient to reposition the bed in the COVID-19 intensive care unit (ICU) at the United Memorial Medical Center (UMMC) on October 31, 2020 in Houston, Texas. According to reports, Texas has reached over 916,000 cases, including over 18,000 deaths. (Photo by Go Nakamura/Getty Images)

Hospitalizations were on the rise in 47 states last month, according to the Covid Tracking Project, and a total of 47,502 people were hospitalized as of Sunday. The rates come alongside a surge of cases that made October a record setting month for coronavirus infections in the US.

Loading...

Load Error

The US recorded its highest number of new cases on Friday with a reported 99,321, the record for any nation in the world. And experts have said that the impacts will likely continue to get worse as colder months drive up infections.

“We’re right at the beginning of what looks like exponential growth in a lot of states,” Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration, said on CBS’s “Face the Nation” on Sunday. “This is very worrisome as we head into the winter.”

Gottlieb expects Thanksgiving to be an inflection point, and from there he said the hospital system is going to be facing pressure similar to the early spikes — when hospitals around the country were reaching capacity and healthcare workers were stretched thin.

Dr. Christopher Murray, director of the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, said hospitalizations are the best measure of how the nation is faring against the pandemic and are often an indicator of how the number of deaths will trend.

The seven-day average for new cases currently is more than 81,300 — higher than any other time in the pandemic. The surge has brought cases to more than 9.2 million in the US since the pandemic began, and 230,996 people have died, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

Coronavirus accelerating in states

Covid-19 spread and hospitalizations have reached staggering levels across states.

This week, there were more new coronavirus cases in Kentucky than any other week since the pandemic began, Gov. Andy Beshear said in a statement Sunday.

“I know we’re tired, but if we do not get the spread of this disease under control, we risk a darker, more deadly period this winter than we ever experienced in the spring,” Beshear said.

Illinois is working to manage the virus by putting the entire state under resurgence mitigation measures, Gov. J.B. Pritzker and the Illinois Department of Public Health said Sunday. The state reported nearly 7,000 new cases on Sunday.

“As cases, hospitalizations and deaths are rising across our state, across the Midwest and across the nation, we have to act responsibly and collectively to protect

Read more

Ontario fitness industry urges members to pressure Ford government to allow gyms to reopen

Goodlife Fitness is urging its members to pressure the Ontario government to allow gyms to reopen in parts of the province where they’ve been forced to close because of rising COVID-19 cases.

In an email sent to members across the province Tuesday, the fitness giant is encouraging its members to write a letter to their local MPP, Premier Doug Ford and Health Minister Christine Elliott among others.

“Between mandated shutdowns, capacity restrictions, and ongoing questions about the safety of fitness facilities, our industry is facing the most difficult time in its history,” the email reads.

Jason Sheridan, senior vice-president of operations at Goodlife, said the email was sent to more than 175,000 members.

The campaign is led by the Fitness Industry Council of Canada. Other businesses who are part of the industry council will also take part.

“Through this campaign . . . we are keen to advance the discussions with the Ontario government and public health and to help co-create any enhanced guidelines for gyms across Ontario,” Sheridan told the Star.

“We are open to navigating this situation together and working to develop solutions that would allow us to continue to invest in the health and wellness of Ontarians.”

The letter, sent with the subject line Stand Up for Fitness, discusses the impact the shutdown has had on the province’s fitness industry, citing the benefits of physical benefits on mental health during the pandemic and reducing the strain on local health-care systems as a result.

As cases spiked in the province, and concerns that group activity in indoor spaces may be adding to the transmission of the virus, Ford ordered the closure of all gyms in Ottawa and parts of the GTA on Oct. 10.

In Quebec, a group of fitness centre owners says its members are no longer planning to open Thursday in defiance of that government’s lockdown orders.

On Monday, a coalition of more than 250 gym owners threatened to open their doors this week, prompting a warning from Premier Francois Legault that they and their clients would be fined.

Gym owners in Ontario have not gone that far, but are still heated over the impact from the temporary closure.

The office of Lisa MacLeod, Ontario minister of heritage, sport and tourism, acknowledges the struggles the fitness industry is going through but says the government will continue to follow public health advice.

“This is a difficult time for so many businesses that are already struggling, which is why we are working hard to make $300 million available as soon as possible to cover fixed costs,” minister spokesperson Dakota Brasier said.

“We will continue to take prudent and progressive action to reopen based on expert public health advice as soon as it’s safe to do so.”

Sweat and Tonic, a Toronto boutique fitness studio is part of an online petition in collaboration with the Ontario Independent Fitness Studios Association and 300 other businesses to advocate for the re-opening of fitness studios.

Morgan Thomas, general manager at Sweat and

Read more

PM under pressure to toughen rules after highest death toll since May



Shoppers in Nottingham ahead of the region being moved into Tier 3 coronavirus restrictions on Thursday. The very high level of restrictions includes a ban on social mixing both indoors and in private gardens, pubs and bars closing unless they can operate as a restaurant, and residents are advised against overnight stays in other parts of the UK and they should avoid travel where possible in and out of the area, unless it is for work, education or caring responsibilities. (Photo by Joe Giddens/PA Images via Getty Images)


© PA Wire/PA Images
Shoppers in Nottingham ahead of the region being moved into Tier 3 coronavirus restrictions on Thursday. The very high level of restrictions includes a ban on social mixing both indoors and in private gardens, pubs and bars closing unless they can operate as a restaurant, and residents are advised against overnight stays in other parts of the UK and they should avoid travel where possible in and out of the area, unless it is for work, education or caring responsibilities. (Photo by Joe Giddens/PA Images via Getty Images)

The prime minister is under mounting pressure to bring in tougher coronavirus rules after UK deaths hit their highest level for five months.

There were 367 deaths linked to the virus recorded on Tuesday, and nearly 23,000 more cases.

Downing Street has not rebuffed an internal projection from its SAGE experts that this winter could see more fatalities than the spring, with a spokesman calling latest figures “concerning”.



a man wearing a suit and tie: Boris Johnson is said to be under 'intense lobbying' to take action


© Getty
Boris Johnson is said to be under ‘intense lobbying’ to take action

The prime minister is coming under “intense” lobbying from experts such as chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance to ramp up restrictions, according to The Daily Telegraph.

It says government advisers fear that daily deaths could remain in the hundreds for at least three months.

____________________________________________________

More on coronavirus:

Download the Microsoft News app for full coverage of the crisis

Latest social rules for all three tiers explained (Mirror)

‘PM isn’t taking Covid seriously anymore’ (The Independent)

____________________________________________________

They have also warned that the whole of England will need to be under the toughest Tier 3 restrictions by mid-December, The Sun reports.

The current official count of COVID-related deaths in the UK is nearly 59,000.

Gallery: Second wave of COVID-19 hits Europe (Photo Services) 

Read more

Nicox Selects Development Candidate in a New Class of NO-mediated Intraocular Pressure (IOP) Lowering Agents

 

October 23, 2020 – release at 7:30 am CET
Sophia Antipolis, France

Nicox SA (Euronext Paris: FR0013018124, COX), an international ophthalmology company, today announced that it has selected a new development candidate, NCX 1728, from its proprietary research program focused on nitric oxide (NO)-mediated IOP lowering agents.  An analog of this molecule has demonstrated1 positive results in ocular hypertensive non-human primates compared to travoprost 0.1%, a prostaglandin analog.  Prostaglandin analogs are the standard of care for IOP lowering therapies.

Nicox owns all exclusive worldwide rights to NCX 1728.  Further optimization of the ophthalmic formulations of NCX 1728 will continue prior to initiating formal pre-Investigational New Drug (IND) tests required for the filing of an IND application. 

Michele Garufi, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Nicox commented We are very proud to announce the selection of this new drug candidate, NCX 1728, which becomes our third in-house development program.  NCX 1728 is the first in a new class of molecules combining the clinically proven effects of nitric oxide with phosphodiesterase-5 inhibition, which has been shown to enhance the efficacy and the duration of nitric oxide-mediated effects.”

NCX 1728 was invented in Nicox’s Bresso (Milan, Italy) Research Laboratories using the Company’s proprietary NO-donating research platform, which has enabled the development of a leading scientific and strategic position in the therapeutic application of NO-donating compounds. 

NO-mediated IOP lowering agents

It has been established that NO plays a key role in the regulation of IOP and can be linked with other pharmaceutical agents, as is the case with our lead clinical development candidate NCX 470, a second generation NO-donating prostaglandin analog, and the first generation product, VYZULTA® (latanoprostene bunod ophthalmic solution), 0.024%.  VYZULTA is exclusively licensed worldwide to our partner Bausch + Lomb, who is commercializing it in the U.S. and Canada.  The effect of NO on IOP lowering may be further increased or prolonged by phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors, which inhibit the degradation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), a key intracellular messenger that is produced as a result of stimulation by NO.

NCX 1728 is the first in a new class of compounds where NO-mediated effects are enhanced by concomitant action of PDE5 inhibition within the same molecule.  Data presented2on this class at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) show statistically significant IOP changes compared to vehicle in laser-induced ocular hypertensive non-human primates.  Additional data recently published1showed that a molecule of this class reduces IOP to a similar extent but with a faster onset of action when compared to travoprost.

Nicox is terminating the research collaboration with Novaliq GmbH concerning their water-free enabling EyeSol® technology since NCX 1728 has been selected and will be developed using an in-house, proprietary formulation.

References:

 

Source Article

Read more