After 41 years of practice, Mendota Heights doctor finds renewed purpose in virtual medicine

Dr. Carolyn Borow has delivered more than 3,500 babies in her 41 years as a family doctor. But she hasn’t delivered one since the coronavirus pandemic began.

Instead Borow, like many medical professionals, has gone virtual, doing all those appointments about pregnancy complications, sore throats and COVID fears via computer and FaceTime. In fact, the only time she’s been in a hospital recently was when she herself had surgery.

“I am definitely going through baby withdrawal,” said Borow, who works out of Allina Health in West St. Paul and Eagan. “I’d never planned that at some point I’m not going to be doing this. Only a pandemic would keep me from it.”

At a time when a growing number of veteran doctors are suddenly considering retirement, Borow is finding renewed purpose in her work.

A 2020 survey of 2,300 U.S. physicians by the nonprofit Physicians Foundation reported that 37% of doctors said they would like to retire within a year. Many expressed fear for their personal health, including 28% who had “serious concerns” about catching COVID-19.

Borow, though, sees value in her shifting work experience.

“I thank everybody who is making these appointments,” Borow said. “Because it has allowed me to still feel meaningful. Because I had no intention ever of not continuing to serve people.”

Initially, to cut down on coronavirus exposure, Allina limited the number of its doctors going in and out of United Hospital in St. Paul, where Borow has worked. So, Allina hired doctors to serve full time in the hospital.

Secondly, because of her age and medical risks during the COVID crisis, Borow decided to curtail her in-person contact with patients. She went virtual on the fly.

“It was all new to me,” she said of distance doctoring. “But in my motivation to serve people, I just learned it quickly.”

Borow is as busy as ever. An empty nester with a retired husband, she dons her scrubs every morning — in the clinic, she used to wear streets clothes and a lab coat — and sits at an Allina-issued computer in her son’s old bedroom in their Mendota Heights home. Her two cats sometimes scratch at the door. But Borow is diligent and determined, officially working 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday (actually, two nights until 6) and on-call every other weekend. Of course, that doesn’t include the two or three hours every night of paperwork and the pre-shift prep for her appointments.

She also spends a half-day per week in the clinic signing forms, wearing a mask and shield over her glasses.

With a different virtual patient scheduled every 20 minutes, the doctor is much more punctual than in her days at the clinic, where an assistant could warn an impatient patient that the physician is running late.

“I have openings every day, people can get right in, which was never the case before,” Borow said. “Although before, we could work someone in with double booking.”

She’s now able to see patients

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Pembroke dentist convicted in drunk driving death can’t practice for six months

PEMBROKE —
Pembroke dentist Christy Natsis has lost her license to practice for six months in connection to her past conviction of drunk driving causing death. 

Natis was sentenced to five years in prison in 2012 after being found guilty of drunk driving causing death in a 2011 crash that killed Bryan Casey on Highway 17 near Arnprior. She was granted parole in June of 2019 after serving just 13 months and resumed her practice a short time later. 

A hearing before the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario on Thursday found Natsis guilty of two allegations against her, one of breaking the law and a second of disgraceful, dishonourable, unprofessional or unethical conduct.

The decision means Natsis has been formally reprimanded by the College, will have her license suspended for six months and have her practice monitored with regular visits until April 18, 2023. The suspension will take effect on Dec. 26. She must also pay $7,500 in costs. 

Natsis’ trial was one of the long in Canadian history, dragging on for three years before she was convicted and another two years for appeals to be exhausted. 

Casey, a father of three, was killed in the crash with Natsis on the night of March 31, 2011.

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NCLA Brief Asks DC Circuit to Stop FDA’s Improper Attempt to Regulate the Practice of Medicine

Washington, D.C., Nov. 24, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The New Civil Liberties Alliance, a nonpartisan, nonprofit civil rights group, filed an amicus brief in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit supporting a challenge to a Final Rule issued by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Rule bans “electrical stimulation devices” (ESDs) for aversion therapy, currently in use in only one treatment facility in the United States—the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center in Canton, Massachusetts.

NCLA argues that the statute on which FDA relies does not provide FDA the rulemaking authority it seeks to exercise. Congress adopted the statute to permit FDA to move swiftly to prevent manufacturers from continuing to distribute fraudulent or hazardous medical devices commercially during the time it would take for FDA to prevail in a court proceeding. That rationale is inapplicable when, as here, no manufacturer is seeking to distribute the devices targeted by FDA commercially.

The Center’s professional staff seeks only to continue to use the devices it manufactured many years ago to deter severe self-injurious or aggressive behavior in its own patients. Under those circumstances, the sole enforcement measure available to FDA is a lawsuit seeking an injunction and seizure of the devices—a course of action that would at least have provided Petitioners the hearing rights they were denied in the rulemaking proceeding.

For decades, Massachusetts courts have deemed that the Center’s aversion therapy is both safe and effective for hundreds of patients. Thus, fearing that a federal court would reject its “unreasonable and substantial risk” claim, FDA opted to pursue a rulemaking proceeding. By proceeding in this fashion, for only the third time in its history, FDA was able to prevent the Center from cross-examining FDA’s witnesses and from effectively responding to the assertions FDA made to support its finding.

FDA seeks to prevent the Center from continuing to use its ESDs, but FDA’s rule will allow substantially similar medical devices to continue being used to treat other medical conditions, such as for smoking cessation. NCLA is deeply concerned that FDA has violated the petitioners’ procedural rights and has arrogated to itself powers not delegated to it by Congress. NCLA is asking the court to vacate the rule. 

NCLA released the following statement: 

“Not only is the FDA acting in bad faith, but it’s interfering with the practice of medicine by attempting to dictate how the Center must treat its patients. The law that permits hearing-less bans would violate due process rights—and thus would be simply unconstitutional.”

Rich Samp, Senior Litigation Counsel, NCLA

ABOUT NCLA

NCLA is a nonpartisan, nonprofit civil rights group founded by prominent legal scholar Philip Hamburger to protect constitutional freedoms from violations by the Administrative State. NCLA’s public-interest litigation and other pro bono advocacy strive to tame the unlawful power of state and federal agencies and to foster a new civil liberties movement that will help restore Americans’ fundamental rights.

 

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Winnipeg Dental Practice Announces The Addition Of A New Dentist To The Company As They Continue To Grow & Expand – Press Release

Winnipeg Dental Practice Announces The Addition Of A New Dentist To The Company As They Continue To Grow & Expand

East Kildonan Dental Group, a fast-growing dental practice, is delighted to announce the addition of a new dentist to their ever-expanding team. The new dentist Dr. Ji Hun Han was born in Seoul, South Korea, and then moved to Winnipeg in 1998. He completed his D.M.D at the University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry in 2020 and his Bachelor of Science in Dentistry [B.Sc. (DENT)] with research on nanoparticles and their use in dentistry.

WINNIPEG, Canada East Kildonan Dental Group, a fast-growing dental practice, is delighted to announce the addition of a new dentist to their ever-expanding team. The new dentist Dr. Ji Hun Han was born in Seoul, South Korea, and then moved to Winnipeg in 1998. He completed his D.M.D at the University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry in 2020 and his Bachelor of Science in Dentistry [B.Sc. (DENT)] with research on nanoparticles and their use in dentistry.  

Although he enjoys all aspects of general dentistry, his driving passion is in the education of patients, with the aims of improving their oral health and preventing potential disease progression. He acknowledges that dental anxiety is a huge issue for many patients and has devised a range of strategies to help patients overcome their worries and concerns. He is interested in building a relationship with his patients so that they feel comfortable at their dental appointments, and is constantly working to improve his dental skills and knowledge through continuing education courses. Outside of his work, he enjoys rock climbing, playing soccer, and watching movies in his spare time. He is also fluent in English and Korean. 

“We are thrilled to have Dr. Han on our team, and we know that he will be a valuable asset to the business,” said dental colleague, Alex Serebnitski. “Dr. Han stood out from the crowd, has an excellent work ethic, and also demonstrates compassion and a nurturing attitude, which reflects our business ethos. We look forward to working with him for many years to come.” 

East Kildonan Dental is a locally owned and operated business in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The dental office was initially established in 1949, and over the years, has become a staple in East Kildonan. They take pride in the quality and variety of dental services they’ve offered to many friends and families over the years. 

With the addition of Dr. Han, East Kildonan Dental Group is extending its hours of operation. They can see more patients because of the new dentist. This business is continually working to serve the people of Winnipeg better, and their practice is now more accessible thanks to their growing team.

The new hours are Monday to Thursday, from 8 AM – 8 PM, and Friday to Saturday from 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM.

For more information about the company and the various dental services that they provide, visit their website at https://ekdentalgroup.com/.

https://www.ekdentalgroup.com/news/winnipeg-dental-practice-announces-addition-new-dentist-company-they-continue-grow-expand

https://local.google.com/place?id=5349875352996246164&use=posts&lpsid=3119218641341562462

https://g.page/EastKildonanDental?share

 

Media Contact
Company Name: East Kildonan Dental Group
Contact Person: Alex Serebnitski
Email: Send Email
Phone: 204-661-2614
Address:807 Henderson

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Northwestern Medicine Partners with Caption Health to Introduce New Artificially Intelligent Ultrasound Systems into Clinical Practice

Northwestern Medicine Partners with Caption Health to Introduce New Artificially Intelligent Ultrasound Systems into Clinical Practice

PR Newswire

CHICAGO, Oct. 28, 2020

Northwestern Memorial Hospital First in Country to Adopt Caption AI in Multiple Clinical Settings

CHICAGO, Oct. 28, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Northwestern Memorial Hospital is the first hospital in the United States to purchase Caption Health’s artificial intelligence (AI) technology for ultrasound, Caption AI. The FDA cleared, AI-guided ultrasound system enables healthcare providers to acquire and interpret quality ultrasound images of the human heart, increasing access to timely and accurate cardiac assessments at the point of care.

Performing an ultrasound exam is a complex skill that takes years to master. Caption AI enables clinicians—including those without prior ultrasound experience—to quickly and accurately perform diagnostic-quality ultrasound exams by providing expert turn-by-turn guidance, automated quality assessment and intelligent interpretation capabilities. The systems are currently in the hospital’s emergency department, medical intensive care unit, cardio-oncology clinic and in use by the hospital medicine group.

“Through our partnership with Caption Health, we are looking to democratize the echocardiogram, a stalwart tool in the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease,” said Patrick McCarthy, MD, chief of cardiac surgery and executive director of the Northwestern Medicine Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute, a group involved in the early development of the technology. “Our ultimate goal is to improve cardiovascular health wherever we need to, and Caption AI is increasing access throughout the hospital to quality diagnostic images.”

Caption AI emulates the expertise of a sonographer by providing real-time guidance on how to position and manipulate the transducer, or ultrasound wand, on a patient’s body. The software shows clinicians in real time how close they are to acquiring a quality ultrasound image, and automatically records the image when it reaches the diagnostic-quality threshold. Caption AI also automatically calculates ejection fraction, or the percentage of blood leaving the heart when it contracts, which is the most widely used measurement to assess cardiac function.

“Northwestern Medicine has been a tremendous partner in helping us develop and validate Caption AI. We are thrilled that they are bringing Caption AI into key clinical settings as our first customer,” said Charles Cadieu, chief executive officer and co-founder of Caption Health. “The clinical, economic and operational advantages of using AI-guided ultrasound are clear. Most important, this solution increases access to a safe and effective diagnostic tool that can be life-saving for patients.”

Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has a number of benefits. Increased usage of POCUS contributes to more timely and accurate diagnoses, more accurate monitoring and has been shown to lead to changes in patient management in 47% of cases for critically ill patients. POCUS also allows patients to avoid additional visits to receive imaging, as well as providing real-time results that can be recorded into a patient’s electronic medical record.

“I think the most exciting part is that Caption AI allows our intensive care unit (ICU) providers to do a point-of-care, real-time ultrasound for a sick patient,” said James “Mac”

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Lack of Chelsea practice games delaying Hakim Ziyech return to fitness, says Frank Lampard

Hakim Ziyech’s return to full fitness has been delayed by Chelsea’s failure to get the winger involved in enough practice games, Frank Lampard has revealed.

The Morocco international has recovered from the knee injury that kept him out of the start of the season.

It has seen him come on as a substitute in the draws against Southampton and Sevilla – but the 27-year-old is still to regain full match fitness.


Lampard and Chelsea’s medical staff were so eager for Ziyech to get minutes on the pitch that they supported him joining up with Morocco during the international break, where he played 30-plus minutes against Senegal before being cleared to make his club debut.

Lampard has revealed how Covid-19 restrictions have impacted on his recovery time.

Christian Pulisic reacts to Chelsea’s draw against Sevilla

“It’s very difficult,” said the Chelsea manager. “We have a bubble at Cobham. We cannot play against the under 23s or bring over a lot of kids to replicate 11v11 games on big-sized pitches, which is generally where you would want someone to work when they’ve not played for six months off the back of an injury.

“So we miss that. We just have to do the best we can, train as well as we can, find the right way to give Hakim minutes and others in the squad because a few signings did come in with different issues, and try to do that as quickly as we can. It’s a big challenge.

“Hakim has confidence about him, his fitness is coming, he still needs time to get his actual match fitness.”

Lampard has praised Ziyech’s attitude since joining from Ajax – and his leadership qualities.

“When I look at squad always want to help grow the idea of leaders in the group,” he added. “Personalities within the group. Over the course of long, difficult seasons when we play so many games there will be moments when you really rely on them to help you in tough times.

“I don’t think you can get on in any elite team sport without people with personality and character in your team. I’ve seen that in Hakim and I’ve seen that in Mendy, as soon as they came through

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Schenectady practice helping to eliminate nerve pain

SCHENECTADY — Cyndie Powell loves to cook.

But her lower back pain and sciatica were so bad that she had to sit on a stool in her kitchen in order to cook. She couldn’t stand the pain from standing after just five minutes.

Powell, a resident of Schuylerville who works as a program manager and financial consultant for 1st Scotia Wealth Management, tried everything to dull the pain.

She tried over-the-counter pain relievers and massage. She visited a chiropractor. And she didn’t want to get surgery.

“Nothing really ever made the pain go away,” Powell said.

Until she met Laura Brown, a physical therapist and massage therapist in Schenectady who earlier this year invested in buying and getting trained to operate a electrical stimulation, or eSTIM, medical device made by a company called Calmare.

The machine has the ability to target five separate parts of the body by sending electronic pulses that “reset” the nerves, making them essentially forget the pain. The device can help with fibromyalgia, migraines, sciatica, neuropathy and what is known as Complex Regional Pain Syndrome.


Brown’s business is known as Capital Region Calmare. She operates the only licensed Calmare facility in the local area. Until now, patients who wanted to try the technology would have to travel to Stony Brook on Long Island. Brown has continued to operate her massage business as well.

“I’ve seen firsthand the extraordinary pain relief it’s provided to individuals who have tried traditional treatments, sometimes for years, without success,” Brown said, “There is no better feeling than giving someone his or her life back by re-introducing them to a world without pain, and to do so without any side effects, drugs or surgical procedures is a huge benefit.”

The treatment by the device is not covered by insurance, although some of the physical therapy done as part of the treatment is. The initial session when Brown evaluates a patient costs $100, while each subsequent session costs $250, although Brown offers 10 treatments at a discount for $2,000.

Powell, who has been working from home during the pandemic but travels an hour for treatments, said she got relief after each treatment. The pain would come back to a degree after each one.

But after four sessions, Powell said the pain went away for good. And there was no pain or side effects. She says the electronic therapy is a great alternative to opioids that are often prescribed for back pain. Patients often need more than four sessions.

“It was like a miracle,” Powell said.

[email protected]

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Glaring Gap Between Vit D Guidance and Practice in Care Homes

Vitamin D supplementation in elderly care home residents is largely viewed as a “medicine” rather than a protective nutrient, risking vitamin D deficiency in this particularly vulnerable population, say British public health scientists.

Writing in BMJ Nutrition Prevention & Health, they stress an urgent review is needed of the nutritional guidelines and regulations in England on the use of the vitamin in elderly residential care homes.

Vitamin D supplementation “needs a professional separation from medicine and reframing as a matter of public health nutrition as well as a medical responsibility,” emphasizes Joe Williams, MSc Public Health graduate, Brighton University, UK, and colleagues.

The findings reveal “both a failure to implement evidence-based recommendations and a social injustice in urgent need of public health advocacy and resolution,” they emphasize.

For 30 years, vitamin D 10 µg as a daily supplement has been endorsed for care home residents. In 2016, the recommendations were extended to the entire population in the winter months and throughout the year for those living in care homes.

But this new study shows care home staff understood that they were only allowed to give residents vitamin supplements that have been prescribed and that physicians had been advised by the UK National Health Service not to prescribe preventative vitamins because they can be bought cheaply over the counter.

“This means that elderly care home residents often do not get the vitamin D they require, leaving them at increased risk of falls,” Williams explained.

Vitamin D May Protect Against COVID-19

In the United States, the Institute of Medicine recommends 800 IU/day of vitamin D, and the American Association of Family Physicians/American Geriatric Society recommends 1000 IU/day.

“It is not a medicine to be taken only as needed,” Catharine Ross, PhD, professor of nutrition and physiology at Penn State University, told Medscape Medical News.

“The diet of individuals who do not get much sunlight needs to include enough of the vitamin in foods or from a nutritional supplement,” she stressed.

“The elderly living in long-term care facilities are a particular concern,” she added. “They may not have much sun exposure, and it is known that the skin of older persons is not so efficient at making vitamin D. So for this group especially, attention does need to be paid to getting sufficient vitamin D from diet or a vitamin D-containing supplement,” she said.

Martin Kohlmeier, MD, PhD, from the UNC Nutrition Research Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, wholeheartedly agreed.

Vitamin D deficiency increases not only the risk of bone fractures, but could also make people more susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection and worsen outcomes, he said. 

“Everybody should use a moderately dosed vitamin D supplement, and guiding patients and the public towards this is already established policy in many countries including the UK,” he said.  

Dereliction of Duty: Whose Responsibility Is it to Give Vitamin D?

“Unfortunately,” said Kohlmeier, “this message has not reached all health professionals and care providers.” 

And he went so far as

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Cherry Hill doctor can’t practice medicine after conspiracy conviction

TRENTON – A Cherry Hill doctor who pleaded guilty to defrauding Medicare can no longer practice medicine in New Jersey, a state agency says.

Robert Claude McGrath, D.O., has retired his license under a consent order with the state Board of Medical Examiners, according to the agency’s website. It said the license retirement would be “deemed a permanent revocation.”

Separately, a Stratford doctor  has agreed to a temporary suspension of his license after pleading guilty to a federal crime, the board said.

Michael Goldis, D.O., will stop practicing medicine on Oct. 30 under an interim consent order.

The board noted McGrath pleaded guilty in June 2017 to conspiring to commit health care fraud and received a 30-month term in federal prison.

McGrath admitted to defrauding Medicare and other health care benefit programs of $890,000 in payments, according to the order.

McGrath, 69, was released from custody in May of this year.

The doctor and his chiropractor son — Robert Christopher McGrath, 48, of Cherry Hill —were accused of using unqualified people to give physical therapy, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for New Jersey.

The fraud took place from January 2011 through April 2016, the federal prosecutor’s office said.

It said the McGraths owned Atlantic Spine & Joint Institute, a practice with offices in Westmont and Wayne, Pa., the federal prosecutor’s office said.

The younger McGrath received a 10-month prison term for conspiring to commit health care fraud in December 2017.

The McGraths and Atlantic Spine also agreed to pay $1.78 million plus interest to the federal government to resolve allegations that their scheme caused false claims to be submitted to Medicare. 

The state Attorney General’s Office moved to suspend or revoke the elder McGrath’s license in August, according to the Oct. 13

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Dentist Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta Explains the Field’s Most Common Area of Practice, Centered Around Preventive and Restorative Care

Press release content from Accesswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

ATLANTA, GA / ACCESSWIRE / October 9, 2020 / Focused on preventive and restorative services intended to promote optimum oral health, general dentists make up more than two-thirds of the profession. A popular dentist based in the so-called Peach State of Georgia, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta explains more about the field.

“Often I’m asked, ‘What is general dentistry?’” says Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta, speaking from his office in the Gwinnett County city of Norcross.

According to Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta, as many as 80 percent of all qualified individuals-those using their dental degree in some fashion-in the United States are considered general dentists. “Distinct from those who are focused primarily on one area of dental practice, such as periodontics, general dentists handle an array of different services, vital to the continued oral health of their patients,” he explains.

The general dentistry field, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta goes on to illustrate, primarily covers preventive and restorative services. “General dentists may also take care of cosmetic procedures,” adds the expert, “as well as overall health concerns, such as in the case of obstructive sleep apnea.”

For many people, the one healthcare provider that they see more than any other is their dentist. Invariably, this will be a general dentist, says Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta. “As general dentists, we are the primary providers of dental care to patients of all ages,” he points out.

Routine visits, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta suggests, to a family dentist, are the most common occurrence in a general dentistry practice, followed by professional cleaning, and, in the presence of decay, the process of filling an affected tooth.

The majority of patients are advised, Dr. Roach says, to visit their dentist at regular intervals to keep their pearly whites in tip-top condition. “Anywhere from quarterly to once or twice per year should be the norm for a typical patient,” proposes Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta, “although a quick conversation with your chosen dentist will provide a more concrete idea.”

All general dentists, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta reports, have successfully completed four years of education at an accredited dental school. “They will also have fulfilled the requirements of their local state licensing board,” he explains, “including testing and, in some instances, continuing education.”

Proudly practicing dentistry for more than two decades, Dr. Frank Roach is based in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta metropolitan statistical area city of Norcross. Norcross, in turn, is located in Gwinnett County – a suburban county of Atlanta in the north-central portion of Georgia. Home to almost a million people, Gwinnett County is the second-most populous in the so-called Peach State after Fulton County.

In addition to general dentistry, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta also focuses on dental implants, veneers, and teeth whitening, among a number of other services. In his spare time, Dr. Roach is a keen scuba diver, an avid tennis player, and is the proud guardian

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