Popular Banquet Venue Shutting Down Operations Until Spring

SOUTHINGTON, CT — One of the state’s most popular banquet venues will be taking the colder months off, citing coronavirus restrictions.

The announcement was made on the Aqua Turf Club’s Facebook page. It is located at 556 Mulberry St. in the Plantsville section of Southington.

“To all our valued business customers, brides and their family, community, staff and vendors … As we enter the winter season and upcoming, cold New England weather, the ATC will be initiating a temporary shutdown,” it read.

Officials said in the announcement the shutdown will be similar to what the business underwent this past spring, when starting in mid-March, “we were unable to provide our customary services due to Covid-19 restrictions and regulations.”

All 2020 weddings and “standard bookings” have either taken place, been postponed or in some cases, canceled, officials said.

Officials said they expect to resume operations early March, “with anticipated expectation we will be allowed to do so.”

Officials continued, “We will monitor the state of Connecticut’s executive orders relating to our industry. We hope to see an increase in the allowable indoor capacity, the public’s comfort level when attending an indoor event, or best-case scenario, the release of a viable vaccine.”

Officials were adamant the announcement make no implication that the venue is closing permanently.

“We will remain open for tours, phone calls, and emails for those wishing to communicate with us or who are interested in hosting a future event, as well as working on various projects to the facility. We have some dates available for 2021 and currently booking through 2023,” officials said. “While we appreciate those who are concerned for us and our industry, we would rather anyone with a question regarding an event they have scheduled or wish to schedule, to reach out to us personally so we may quell any uncertainties you may have.”

This article originally appeared on the Southington Patch

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Traditional Chinese medicine popular among Russian elites amid epidemic

A Russian woman applies moxibustion to a boy to prevent virus. Photo: Courtesy of Huang Guorong

The Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has a history of more than 20 years spreading in Russia, especially among governmental officials and businessmen. With the development of COVID-19 epidemic in Russia, TCM has been gaining recognition in preventing virus and strengthening treatment.

The Global Times has learned that the wide use of TCM, such as Lianhua Qingwen Capsule, a Chinese herbal product, to treat COVID-19 has also helped TCM gain more attention in Russia.  

As early as in April, Lianhua Qingwen capsule has been approved for use in COVID-19 treatments in China. Beijing TCM authorities said the capsule can alleviate COVID-19 symptoms such as fever, cough and fatigue.

Zhang Boli, an academician with the Chinese Academy of Engineering, told the media in April that Russia is considering approving the capsule as a medicine. 

A Global Times reporter in Moscow noticed that a few Russian medicine websites translated the specification of the capsule in detail and the medicine can be purchased online.

Huang Guorong, a Moscow-based Chinese doctor who graduated from the Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, said that more Russians have been trying TCM to prevent COVID-19 since the epidemic developed in the country.

“Compared with the Western medicine using antibiotic, the TCM focuses on the mediation of the whole body, which defends the body through strengthening your immunity,” he told the Global Times.

Photo: IC

Even though there have been introductions on TCM on Russia’s TV or newspapers from time to time, and most people in the country have heard about it, only a small number have tried it.

“In Russia, TCM is not cheap,” he said. “And some kinds of herbs have not been approved by the medicine authority in Russia yet.”

But it is understood that “the rich and powerful people would recommend their friends to try TCM once they found it useful,” Huang said.

Li Yunhai, another prestigious Chinese doctor in Moscow, said some Russian officials visited TCM doctors during the epidemic for prevention and treatment. 

Li has received a Russian official who suffered from high blood pressure, weakness and asthma after recovering from COVID-19. Li gave him skin scraping, acupuncture and herbs, and after one course of treatment, the official recovered. 

Huang would not disclose how many clients from the high-level government officials he has received, but said they include  Moscow’s district officials and members of the State Duma.

Though he has not heard if President Putin has accepted TCM treatment, he does know a Russian friend who wrote to the president’s office to advocate the use of TCM in COVID-19 prevention and treatment across the country. “But we haven’t received a reply yet,” Huang said.

Former Russian president Boris Yeltsin had a TCM therapist, Huang said, adding that the 1990s was the time when the TCM was introduced to Russia and became popular among the officials and business people, he said.

Moreover, Tibetan medicine, similar in some ways to

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FIGS ad: Popular scrubs company generates backlash from women in medicine and DOs after insensitive video

FIGS, a scrubs start-up, apologized for the video and pledged to donate $100,000 to the American Osteopathic Association, an organization for DOs, after the video generated backlash among Twitter’s vibrant medical community.

In the now-deleted video, which was meant to show how one of its pairs of women’s scrub pants looked in action, a bespectacled model played a DO and pretended to scan through the book “Medical Terminology for Dummies,” which she held upside down.

On Twitter, a handful of women health care professionals and DOs quickly criticized the video’s contents and FIGS for producing it.

Brenna Hohl, a first-year medical student from North Carolina, told CNN she found the ad disrespectful, particularly as health care workers face the brunt of coronavirus exposure.

“In the midst of a pandemic, we should be supporting and building up our health care workers, not bringing them down like this,” she said.

She tweeted a response to the video, in which she said “the disrespect for female physicians and DOs exhibited in this ad … is unforgivable.

After addressing the video briefly in two now-deleted tweets, FIGS co-founders Heather Hasson and Trina Spear apologized for publishing the video, which they said was “offensive” and “particularly disparaging” to women in medicine and DOs.

“Our mission at FIGS has always been to empower medical professionals,” the co-founders said in a statement to CNN. “Beyond a lapse in judgment, the bottom line is — our processes at FIGS failed. We are fixing that now. It will never happen again.”

Some women in medicine say video was harmful

FIGS largely caters to young women in the medical profession (though it sells men’s scrubs, too) and is popular among medical students who often serve as brand ambassadors. The company touts its line as the comfortable and fashionable alternative to the “boxy, scratchy, uncomfortable” scrubs of yore.

But some women in health care said they are turned off by the brand after the video.

Dr. Agnieszka Solberg, a radiologist and internal medicine physician in Bismark, North Dakota, has called for a boycott of the brand for its depiction of women and DOs.

“The ‘silly and dumb, but sexy’ look in ads and other media contributes to harmful gender stereotypes,” she told CNN. “When girls see this, they start feeling like this is what is ‘cool,’ and start yearning to be like this.”

In a tweet, Solberg criticized the brand for portraying DOs as less competent than MDs, or doctors of medicine.
The American Osteopathic Association says there’s a harmful stigma toward DOs, who make up 11% of the physician workforce. Both DOs and MDs are trained physicians who are licensed by the same accrediting body. (The main difference is that DOs receive additional training in “whole-body” techniques, as holistic physicians.)

YouTube influencer and family physician Dr. Mike Varshavski encouraged medical students to stop wearing scrubs from the brand.

“They’re willing to put women down; they’re willing to put DOs down to make more money,” the DO said in a
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Popular scrubs company generates backlash from women in medicine and DOs after insensitive video

A popular scrubs company offended DOs and women in medicine alike with a video that appeared to mock doctors of osteopathic medicine, or DOs, and women health care professionals.



a woman holding a cell phone: A now-deleted video, seen above, shared by scrubs company FIGS offended women in medicine and doctors of osteopathic medicine who said it misrepresented women health care professionals and DOs alike.


© from FIGS
A now-deleted video, seen above, shared by scrubs company FIGS offended women in medicine and doctors of osteopathic medicine who said it misrepresented women health care professionals and DOs alike.

FIGS, a scrubs start-up, apologized for the video and pledged to donate $100,000 to the American Osteopathic Association, an organization for DOs, after the video generated backlash among Twitter’s vibrant medical community.

In the now-deleted video, which was meant to show how one of its pairs of women’s scrub pants looked in action, a bespectacled model played a DO and pretended to scan through the book “Medical Terminology for Dummies,” which she held upside down.

On Twitter, a handful of women health care professionals and DOs quickly criticized the video’s contents and FIGS for producing it.

Brenna Hohl, a first-year medical student from North Carolina, told CNN she found the ad disrespectful, particularly as health care workers face the brunt of coronavirus exposure.

“In the midst of a pandemic, we should be supporting and building up our health care workers, not bringing them down like this,” she said.

She tweeted a response to the video, in which she said “the disrespect for female physicians and DOs exhibited in this ad … is unforgivable.

After addressing the video briefly in two now-deleted tweets, FIGS co-founders Heather Hasson and Trina Spear apologized for publishing the video, which they said was “offensive” and “particularly disparaging” to women in medicine and DOs.

“Our mission at FIGS has always been to empower medical professionals,” the co-founders said in a statement to CNN. “Beyond a lapse in judgment, the bottom line is — our processes at FIGS failed. We are fixing that now. It will never happen again.”

Some women in medicine say video was harmful

FIGS largely caters to young women in the medical profession (though it sells men’s scrubs, too) and is popular among medical students who often serve as brand ambassadors. The company touts its line as the comfortable and fashionable alternative to the “boxy, scratchy, uncomfortable” scrubs of yore.

But some women in health care said they are turned off by the brand after the video.

Dr. Agnieszka Solberg, a radiologist and internal medicine physician in Bismark, North Dakota, has called for a boycott of the brand for its depiction of women and DOs.

“The ‘silly and dumb, but sexy’ look in ads and other media contributes to harmful gender stereotypes,” she told CNN. “When girls see this, they start feeling like this is what is ‘cool,’ and start yearning to be like this.”

In a tweet, Solberg criticized the brand for portraying DOs as less competent than MDs, or doctors of medicine.

The American Osteopathic Association says there’s a harmful stigma toward DOs, who make up 11% of the physician workforce. Both DOs and MDs are trained

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Popular Health and Fitness Books Online

Health and fitness is of topmost priority to everyone. Then what happens when your book love unites with the fitness freak in you? Magic happens! The joy is unparalleled when you curl up in a blanket at the corner of your bed with one of the favorite books in hand. The book that was written just the way you want to teach you with the ways to stay fit and healthy following a good diet. What could be better than somebody telling you about how to do the right things exactly?

Find below the popular health and fitness books that may help you keep your diet in check and weight within limits.

The VB6 Cookbook By Mark Bittman

This edition is special because it contains recipes for around 350 healthy and delicious vegan meals. The VB6 diet plan is one of the bestsellers and it helps you stay vegan till six in the evening. Follow part-time veganism which is a smarter way to control weight and become food-friendly. The regimen is easy to adopt and can last for a lifetime. The challenging meal of a breakfast itself is full of dairy-free smoothies, hot cereals, brunch-worthy entrees and toast toppers. Lunches comprise sandwiches, grains, beans, hearty soups and pastas and the snack recipes are the perfect afternoon pick-ups to avoid those vending machine cravings. If you do not want your vegan meals to appear boring or you do not want to give up your favorite food item, this book can help you see your food in a new light.

The Whole30: The 30-Day Guide to Total Health and Food Freedom By Melissa and Dallas Hartwig

It is a recipe-by-recipe and step-by-step guidebook to help people transform their lives in only a month. Go through it for an effortless weight loss by just improving your sleep quality, pepping up your mood, increasing energy levels and your self-esteem. Follow some basic steps and you are near to breaking your unhealthy habits, regulate digestion, reduce cravings and strengthen the immune system. It also includes real-life success stories, an extensive list of frequently-asked questions and community resources to embark upon a journey towards food freedom.

How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease By Michael Greger

It provides the groundbreaking scientific facts related to the diet that may prevent and reverse the causes behind disease-related deaths. The author examines top 15 reasons for premature deaths covering heart disease, diabetes, cancer, high blood pressure and more. He describes how making lifestyle and nutritional interventions can help us avoid medicinal and surgical approaches to elad healthier lives. Did you know that hibiscus tea works better than hypertensive drugs in fighting high blood pressure. Drinking coffee can ward off liver diseases and breast can be avoided by consuming soy. The writer makes a checklist of 12 food items consumed everyday to evade deadly ailments.

Always Hungry? Conquer Cravings, Retrain Your Fat Cells and Lose Weight Permanently By David Ludwig

In this book, …

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