Most voters believe the coronavirus is out of control in the U.S., poll says

A new poll suggests the majority of Americans believe the coronavirus is out of control in the United States as a new wave of infections is moving through the country less than two weeks before the presidential election. 

The Quinnipiac University poll released Thursday found that 6 in 10 likely voters say the spread of the coronavirus is out of control in the U.S., while 35 percent of respondents believe the spread is under control. 


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The survey also found 57 percent of likely voters disapprove of President Trump’s handling of the coronavirus outbreak compared with 41 percent of respondents who said they approve. On handling the response to the deadly pandemic, 55 percent said they believed former Vice President Biden would do a better job, while 38 percent said Trump would. 

“In a historically chaotic election year, voters are feeling like the coronavirus is out of control,” Quinnipiac University Polling Analyst Tim Malloy said. 

The U.S. continues to be the worst-affected country in the world with more than 8.3 million cases and more than 222,000 deaths as of Thursday.

The number of single-day coronavirus deaths reported in the U.S. on Wednesday reached its highest total in two months, rising to 1,237, after deaths nationwide had averaged about 700 a day through most of October, according to Reuters

More than 60,000 daily new cases have been reported for three straight days and hospitals in many states are beginning to exceed capacity. 

The resurgence comes after months of warnings from public health experts and officials who predicted outbreaks would worsen in the colder months alongside flu season. 

The poll of 1,426 likely voters was conducted from Oct. 16-19 with a margin of error of plus or minus 2.6 percentage points. 


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Nearly 8 in 10 report pandemic is causing mental health strain, poll shows

COVID-19, health care, the economy, systemic racism and the presidential election are a threat to the nation’s mental health, according to an American Psychological Association poll.

Seventy-eight percent of adults polled said the pandemic is causing major stress and 60% called the array of issues facing the country overwhelming.

And younger adults are really struggling, the poll revealed.
Respondents from Generation Z — those born since 1996 — pegged their stress level in the past month at a 6 on 10-point scale in which 1 represented “little to no stress” and 10 was “a great deal of stress.” That compared with an average stress level of 5 among all adults.

Nineteen percent of adults said their mental health is worse than it was a year ago.

That included 34% of Gen Z adults, 19% of millennials, who were born between 1977 and 1995, 21% of Gen Xers, who were born between 1965 and 1976, 12% of baby boomers, who were born between 1946 and 1964, and 8% of those born before 1946.

Gen Z adults were the most likely to report common signs of depression.
More than 7 in 10 said that in the last two weeks they were so tired that they sat around and did nothing, felt very restless, found it hard to think or concentrate, felt lonely, or felt miserable or unhappy.

“This survey confirms what many mental health experts have been saying since the start of the pandemic: Our mental health is suffering from the compounding stressors in our lives,” said Arthur Evans Jr., chief executive officer of the APA.
“This compounding stress will have serious health and social consequences if we don’t act now to reduce it,” he said in an association news release.

Evans noted that the youngest Americans are showing signs of serious mental health issues, including depression and anxiety.

The poll found that changes to school are a big stressor for Gen Zers. More than 8 of 10 teens said they have had negative impacts of school closures, and 51% said planning for the future seems impossible.

Among college students, 67% feel the same way about planning for the future. And 87% of Gen Z members in college said school is a significant source of stress.

“Loneliness and uncertainly about the future are major stressors for adolescents and young adults, who are striving to find their places in the world, both socially, and in terms of education and work. The pandemic and its economic consequences are upending youths’ social lives and their visions for their futures,” said survey researcher Emma Adam, a professor of education and social policy at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.

Adam said public policy must address this generation’s need for social, emotional and mental health supports as well as financial assistance and educational and work opportunities. “Both comfort now and hope for the future are essential for the long-term well-being of this generation,” she said.

But most Americans aren’t getting the support they need. Among adults, 61% said

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Pandemic Putting Americans Under Great Mental Strain: Poll | Health News

By Steven Reinberg, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2020 (HealthDay News) — COVID-19, health care, the economy, systemic racism and the presidential election are a threat to the nation’s mental health, according to an American Psychological Association (APA) poll.

Seventy-eight percent of adults polled said the pandemic is causing major stress and 60% called the array of issues facing the country overwhelming.

And younger adults are really struggling, the poll revealed.

Respondents from Generation Z (those born since 1996), pegged their stress level in the past month at a 6 on 10-point scale in which 1 represented “little to no stress” and 10 was “a great deal of stress.” That compared with an average stress level of 5 among all adults.

Nineteen percent of adults said their mental health is worse than it was a year ago.

That included 34% of Gen Z adults; 19% of millennials (born 1977-1995); 21% of Gen Xers (born 1965-1976); 12% of baby boomers (born 1946-1964); and 8% of those born before 1946.

Gen Z adults were the most likely to report common signs of depression.

More than 7 in 10 said that in the last two weeks they were so tired that they sat around and did nothing, felt very restless, found it hard to think or concentrate, felt lonely, or felt miserable or unhappy.

“This survey confirms what many mental health experts have been saying since the start of the pandemic: Our mental health is suffering from the compounding stressors in our lives,” said Arthur Evans Jr., chief executive officer of the APA.

“This compounding stress will have serious health and social consequences if we don’t act now to reduce it,” he said in an association news release.

Evans noted that the youngest Americans are showing signs of serious mental health issues, including depression and anxiety.

The poll found that changes to school are a big stressor for Gen Zers. More than 8 of 10 teens said they have had negative impacts of school closures, and 51% said planning for the future seems impossible.

Among college students, 67% feel the same way about planning for the future. And 87% of Gen Z members in college said school is a significant source of stress.

“Loneliness and uncertainly about the future are major stressors for adolescents and young adults, who are striving to find their places in the world, both socially, and in terms of education and work. The pandemic and its economic consequences are upending youths’ social lives and their visions for their futures,” said survey researcher Emma Adam, a professor of education and social policy at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.

Adam said public policy must address this generation’s need for social, emotional and mental health supports as well as financial assistance and educational and work opportunities. “Both comfort now and hope for the future are essential for the long-term well-being of this generation,” she said.

But most Americans aren’t getting the support they need. Among adults, 61% said they could use

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Gen Z Is the Most Stressed Out Group in America, Poll Finds

Americans aged between 18 to 23, also known as adult Gen Z, are reporting the highest stress levels of any generation in the country, according to a poll.



A stock image shows a stressed student. A poll by the American Psychological Association has found 18 to 23-year-olds are the most stressed generation in the U.S.


A stock image shows a stressed student. A poll by the American Psychological Association has found 18 to 23-year-olds are the most stressed generation in the U.S.

The American Psychological Association’s (APA) Stress in American 2020 report revealed that, on average, Gen Z adults scored their stress levels in the past month as 6.1 out of 10, with 10 being the highest level. The average across all adults was 5.

The survey conducted between August 4 and 26, 2020, by The Harris Poll for the APA, involved 3,409 over-18s living in the U.S. Almost a fifth (19 percent) said their mental health was worse than during the same period last year, at 34 percent of Gen Z adults; 21 percent of Gen Xers aged 42 to 55; 19 percent millennials aged 24 to 41; 12 percent of Boomers, aged 56 to 74, and 8 percent of those aged 75 and above.

Gen Z adults were also more likely to say they were experiencing common symptoms of depression. Three-quarters said they felt so tired in the past two weeks that they “sat around and did nothing,” 74 percent were restless; 73 percent struggled to think properly or concentrate; and the same percentage felt lonely. Some 71 percent felt miserable or unhappy.

Some 81 percent of 13-to-17-year-olds, who are also counted as Gen Zers, said they had suffered negative consequences from school closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Over half (51 percent) said the pandemic has made it feel like planning for the future is impossible, with 67 percent of Gen Z adults feeling the same. Some 87 percent of Gen Z adults who were at college said education is a significant source of stress in their lives.

The poll also revealed 78 percent of Americans felt the COVID-19 pandemic was a significant source of stress in their lives. A further 60 percent said the number of issues America is dealing with was overwhelming. The poll was carried out in a year marked by stressors including a presidential election, protests against racial injustice, an economic recession, and over 220,000 people dying of COVID-19 in the U.S.

Arthur Evans, the CEO of the APA, told Newsweek via email that older people have typically reported less stress than younger generations since the organization carried out its first Stress in America report in 2007. This is likely because people gain life experience, coping skills and resilience as they age, he said.

“For 18-to-23-year-olds, they are just embarking on adulthood—learning to live independently, to manage their finances and to hit milestones like graduating high school or college, having new relationships and getting their first jobs. These events have always been stressful for some, but the new reality of the pandemic means that uncertainty is amplified

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Most People Would Get COVID-19 Vaccine if Offered by Government or Employer: Poll | Top News

LONDON (Reuters) – Most people would get a COVID-19 vaccine if their government or employer recommended it, results of a global poll showed on Tuesday, amid growing concerns about public distrust of the shots being developed at speed to end the pandemic.

Some 71.5% of participants said they would be very or somewhat likely to take a COVID-19 vaccine and 61.4% reported they would accept their employer’s recommendation to do so, according to the survey in June of more than 13,000 people in 19 countries.

The poll was overseen by the Vaccine Confidence Project (VCP), a global surveillance programme on vaccine trust funded by the European Commission and pharmaceutical companies among others, as well as Business Partners to CONVINCE, a U.S./British initiative that is partly government funded.

All respondents, regardless of nationality, said they would be less likely to accept a COVID-19 vaccine if it were mandated by employers.

There were regional differences in responses though, highlighting the polarisation in attitudes on the topic.

Almost 90% of participants in China said they accepted a vaccine, but the rate in Russia was less than 55%. In France, the positive response rate 58.89%, compared with 75.4% in the United States and 71.48% in Britain.

At least 60-70% of the population would need to have immunity to break the chain of transmission, according to the World Health Organization.

Respondents were aged 18 years or older from 19 countries from among the top 35 countries affected by the pandemic in terms of cases per million population.

The results will likely stir the debate about how to overcome public safety concerns, particularly in Western countries, about the frenetic speed of work to develop vaccines, potentially hampering efforts to control the pandemic and revive the global recovery.

There are about 200 COVID-19 vaccine candidates in development globally, including more than 40 in human clinical trials to test for safety and effectiveness. Many are being squeezed into a matter of months for a process that would typically take 10 years or longer.

Scott Ratzan, co-leader of Business Partners to CONVINCE and lecturer at CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, said the data demonstrated diminished public trust.

“It will be tragic if we develop safe and effective vaccines and people refuse to take them,” he said in an email.

“We need to develop a robust and sustained effort to address vaccine hesitancy and rebuild public confidence in the personal, family, and community benefits of immunisations.”

Reporting a willingness to get vaccinated might not be necessarily a good predictor of acceptance, as vaccine decisions can change over time.

Also the poll took place before Russia started the mass inoculation of its population with its Sputnik V shot before full studies had been completed and AstraZeneca

had to pause its late-stage study in September due to a participant’s illness.

Last month, nine leading U.S. and European vaccine developers issued a pledge to uphold scientific standards and testing rigour.

Last week, Facebook Inc

said it would start banning

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