9 of the Best Fitness Tech Items That We Tried This Year, All In One Place

As far as I’m concerned, we’re all living in The Jetsons—except, rather than casually owning flying cars, we’re all flying on techy treads, strapping devices that measure our heart rates on our wrists, and taking yoga classes from a magic mirror on the wall. The future is now, folks. So if you have someone on your holiday list who lives the sweat life, we’ve rounded up the best fitness technology buys you can wrap in a bow and feel confident they’ll love.

From smartwatches to wireless earbuds to next-level recovery devices, we’ve rounded up the gifts that just keep on giving—many of which are on sale right now. You can’t go wrong no matter which one you choose, so let’s get shopping, shall we?



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© Photo: Stocksy/Marco Govel; All Graphics: Well+Good Creative
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1. Fitbit Versa 3, $230


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© Provided by Well+Good



Photo: FitbitThe Fitbit Versa 3 arrives packed with cool features. Perhaps most notably, the device records your “active zone minutes” that buzz when you reach your desired heart rate during exercise. That means when the burpees hit just right, you’ll get a little buzz to say “good job.”

Shop now:  Fitbit Versa 3, $230





© Photo: Peloton


There are few things I wouldn’t do to own this treadmill. After running on one years ago at the Peloton Tread+ studio in New York City, I instantly started a “Peloton” fund to save up for the day when I would purchase this baby and run it into the sunset. Alas, I’m still saving—but we’ll get there. One of the techy features that makes this treadmill all the rage is the fact that you can use easy-access knobs to adjust your speed and incline in seconds, but there’s so much more in store, fam.

Shop now: Peloton Tread, $2,495



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© Photo: Amazon


Ah, the Airpods Pro. I’ve written about them so many times because they are worth every word. With noise-cancellation that literally transplants you to a new world, nothing will disrupt your workouts ever again.

Shop now: Apple Airpods Pro, $250



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© Photo: JAXJOX


Who needs five different kettlebells when you could just buy one adjustable one? This device can adapt from weighing 12 pounds to 42 in less than three seconds and uses artificial intelligence reporting to record your reps, sets, and workout as a whole.

Shop now: JAXJOX Kettlebell Connect 2.0, $199



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© Photo: Powerdot


When you gift someone a Powerdot, you’re gifting them a future of home massages. Just strap it onto any sore muscle group and you’ll feel its Smart Muscle Stimulator get to work on repairing those muscles so you can get out for your run, bike ride, or HIIT workout again soon.

Shop now:  Powerdot 2.0, $199





© Photo: Oura


Ask any expert—a trainer, a makeup artist, a sleep doctor—and they’ll tell you that eight hours of sleep is essential for doing all the things you love. The Oura Ring pays attention while you sleep and delivers a morning report that gives you

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Silver Cross Puts New Visitor Restrictions In Place

NEW LENOX, IL — As coronavirus cases increase across the state, Silver Cross Hospital has updated its visitor policy. The hospital has seen increased COVID-related hospitalizations over the last few weeks, Director of Marketing and Community Relations Debra Robbins told Patch.

As of Monday morning, there are 75 total isolated patients at the hospital. 71 patients are positive for the coronavirus, while four are patients under investigation.

Robbins said one patient is on a ventilator.

“With the growing number of COVID cases in the region, to keep our patients and staff safe, we’ve also implemented visitor restrictions effective today, Nov. 2,” Robbins said.

The new changes are:

  • For emergency department, procedural care unit and obstetrics: 1 visitor is allowed, but it must be the same visitor throughout

  • Inpatients: No visitors allowed unless approved for special circumstances such as a pediatric patient, end-of-life situations, or patients with special needs.

  • Outpatients: No visitors allowed unless the patient needs additional support, such as a pediatric patient, or patients with special needs.

“Please remember to mask, wash your hands often, and practice social distancing,” Robbins said.

This article originally appeared on the New Lenox Patch

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Boutique fitness as we know it is dead, a new kind is taking its place

  • The COVID-19 pandemic has thrown the previously-booming boutique fitness industry into crisis, with studios struggling to pay rent as classes remain closed or at limited capacity.
  • Consumers are increasingly pivoting to digital and at-home fitness as companies like Peloton and Mirror, already successful pre-pandemic, have been booming. 
  • Experts say the coronavirus exposed existing vulnerabilities in the boutique fitness industry, but the market for premium in-person fitness experiences will likely adapt and survive through the pandemic. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

When Flywheel Sports, the revolutionary spin class with a cult following, announced it was permanently closing its doors in September, other studios saw an ominous sign in the world of boutique fitness.

“When it’s as big as Flywheel, that’s when it really gets noticed. That’s exemplifying what’s going to happen over the next 6 months,” said Amanda Freeman, founder of SLT a pilates studio with locations in several states, including New York and New Jersey.

Flywheel was once widely lauded as a paragon of success, expanding to 42 studios since its founding in 2014. In March, the company laid off 98% of its staff. Flywheel declared bankruptcy September 15, joining the ranks of fitness corporations like Gold’s Gym and New York Sports Club parent company Town International Sports, which have had to permanently shutter locations and liquidate assets in response to pandemic-induced closures.

Six months into the pandemic, the boutique fitness industry is now facing a crisis. 

The business of small, often exclusive or luxury spaces, group exercise classes, and typically a specialization (such as high-intensity interval training, or HIIT, barre, spin, or pilates), has boomed in the past decade.

“The big success was built on that idea that you could have an experience with an individual rockstar trainer or the brand identity and community,” said Jared Kaplan, owner and founder of Studio 26, once called the “WeWork” of fitness, providing a co-working space for fitness professionals. 

“People really identified with the experience they were having rather than being a cog in a big box gym, whether that was a dark class with pumping music or a really serene, meditative studio.”

But that highly successful model of home-away-from-home studios with showers, saunas, and luxe changing rooms may be a thing of the past. Instagram-worthy ambience, amenities, and a trainer that remembers your name may not be enough to entice exercisers back into the studio, given evidence that the virus spreads more easily indoors. 

To compete with the at-home fitness industry that’s booming during the pandemic, boutique fitness has to also adapt to meet clients where they are now, which is increasingly at home. And under intense economic and social pressure, studios that are unable or unwilling to change rapidly may not survive at all. 

Even prior to COVID-19, the industry was being squeezed by platforms like ClassPass, which offered subscribers credits to attend multiple studios, rather than faithfully subscribing to one. While boutique studios typically charge a premium per-class fee, ClassPass leveraged lower prices by helping to fill

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Covid ‘test-and-release’ system for airlines hopefully in place by December, says Shapps

A ‘test-and-release system’ to cut the quarantine period for international arrivals to the UK should be in place by 1 December, the transport secretary has said.



Grant Shapps wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera: Photograph: Toby Melville/Reuters


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Toby Melville/Reuters

Grant Shapps said he was “extremely hopeful” that the system, which would require a single coronavirus test to be taken about a week after arrival and paid for privately, would be ready in six weeks’ time, depending on sufficient tests being available through the private sector.

Speaking to the aviation industry Airlines 2050 summit, Shapps said the government travel taskforce he chairs had been “working extensively with health experts and the private testing sector on the practicalities” of such a regime, as well as discussing possible pre-departure test and isolation schemes with partner countries.

He said the taskforce was in contact with more than a dozen firms about different rapid tests. The taskforce is due to report to the prime minister at the start of November on a reformed entry regime.

Asked if the test-and-release system could be running by 1 December, Shapps said: “As long as the [testing] capacity is there through the private sector to do it, I’m extremely hopeful.”

However, the new boss of British Airways signalled that even a seven-day quarantine period would not do much to restart travel.

Sean Doyle, who replaced Álex Cruz as BA chief executive last week, said: “It’s our view that even if that quarantine period is reduced to seven days, people won’t travel here and the UK will get left behind.”

He said BA wanted to see pre-departure testing, particularly to restore major transatlantic routes. BA is now flying two planes a day between London and New York, instead of the normal 12, carrying just 200 passengers, Doyle said.

Doyle quoted recent research by the global airline body Iata that showed there had been only 44 confirmed cases of aircraft passengers contracting Covid-19 onboard, including in the period before wearing face masks was mandatory. He said: “I find that pretty reassuring. That’s one in 27 million, and mostly before people wore face masks.”

Speaking to the summit, Doyle said: “We do not believe quarantine is the solution. The best way to reassure people is to introduce a reliable and affordable test before flying.

“If we look abroad to our near neighbours, we see that business travel and indeed tourism is being prioritised by some countries. We need to get the economy moving again and this just isn’t possible when you’re asking people to quarantine for 14 days.”

The trade body Airlines UK also questioned the value of the proposed regime. Its chief executive, Tim Alderslade, said: “Eight days, plus one or two days to get the results, isn’t going to have the impact we want. If you look at the average number of days people stay in the UK, from the US it’s about four days. Eight days isn’t going to cut the mustard.”



Grant Shapps wearing a suit and tie: Transport secretary, Grant Shapps, told the Airlines 2050 summit the new system could be in place by 1 December.


© Photograph: Toby Melville/Reuters
Transport secretary, Grant Shapps, told the Airlines 2050

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The place in North America with no Covid-19 cases

Covid-19 cases are rising in many parts of Canada, but one region – Nunavut, a northern territory – is a lone place in North American that can say it’s free of coronavirus in its communities.

Last March, as borders around the world were slamming shut as coronavirus infections rose, officials in Nunavut decided they too would take no risks.

They brought in some of the strictest travel regulations in Canada, barring entry to the territory almost all non-residents.

Residents returning home from the south would first have to spend two weeks, at the Nunavut government’s expense, in “isolation hubs” – hotels in the cities of Winnipeg, Yellowknife, Ottawa or Edmonton.

Security guards are stationed throughout the hotels, and nurses check in on the health of those isolating. To date, just over 7,000 Nunavummiut have spent time in these hubs as a stopover on their return home.

It’s not been without challenges: People have been caught breaking isolation and have had stays extended, which has in part contributed to occasional wait times to enter the some of the hubs. There have been complaints about the food available to those confined to the hubs.

But, as coronavirus infections spread throughout Canada, and with the number of cases on the rise again, the official case count in Nunavut remains zero.

Graph of daily cases and deaths in Canada, showing recent uptick
Graph of daily cases and deaths in Canada, showing recent uptick

The “fairly drastic” decision to bring in these measures was made both due to the population’s potential vulnerability to Covid-19 and the unique challenges of the Arctic region, says Nunavut’s chief public health officer, Dr Michael Patterson.

About 36,000 people live in Nunavut, bounded by the Arctic Ocean to the north and the Northwest Territories to the west, in 25 communities scattered across its two million square kilometres (809,000 square miles). That’s about three times the size of the largest US state – Texas.

The distances are “mind-boggling at times”, admits Dr Patterson.

Natural isolation is likely part of the reason for the lack of cases – those communities can only be reached year-round by plane.

A general view of Sylvia Grinnel Territorial Park during a 3 day official visit to Canada on June 29, 2017 in Iqaluit, Canada.
Over 80% of the residents of Nunavut are Inuit

In late September, there was an outbreak linked to workers who flew in from the south to a remote gold mine 160km (100 miles) from the Arctic Circle.

(Those cases are currently being counted as infections in the miners’ home jurisdictions, keeping the territory’s official positive count nil).

That outbreak has “almost no chance” of spreading in the community because there hasn’t been any travel between the mine and any of the communities for months, says Dr Patterson.

But where isolation can help, it can also create hurdles.

Most communities don’t have the capacity to do Covid-19 testing locally, so tests have to be flown in and out.

Early on, tests results could take a week meaning “you’re really, really far behind by the time you can identify and respond”, Dr Patterson says. There are efforts underway to boost testing capacity and turnaround times

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