Authorities Remove Statue of Uyghur Medicine ‘Pioneer’ From Xinjiang Hospital



Radio Free Asia

2020-11-30 — Authorities in northwest China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR) have removed the statue of a progenitor of Uyghur medicinal science from the site of a hospital in the capital Urumqi, as part of what observers say is an ongoing campaign to eradicate the ethnic group’s culture.

Ghazibay, who lived in present-day Hotan (in Chinese, Hetian) between 460 and 375 B.C., was the author of a famous medical treatise—the modern Uyghur-language title of which translates as “Ghazibay’s Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicines.”

A listener recently told RFA’s Uyghur Service that a statue of Ghazibay, whose work documenting medicinal herbs is believed to have drawn disciples of Plato to the Tarim Basin, was taken down from in front of the XUAR Hospital of Uyghur Medicine sometime after authorities launched a campaign of extralegal incarceration in the region in early 2017. Up to 1.8 million Uyghurs and other Muslim minorities are believed to have been detained in a vast network of internment camps since then.

RFA was able to determine from images taken in front of the hospital that the statue was removed sometime between Oct. 26, 2017 and March 9, 2018.

Additionally, a video produced by the hospital that began circulating on Aug. 16, 2019 shows doctors and other hospital staff participating in a flag-raising ceremony and singing “red,” or patriotic, songs in front of the main building, where the statue is nowhere to be found. Details of the hospital grounds visible in the film suggest that the site where the statue once stood now serves as a dedicated space for such forms of compulsory political education.

RFA spoke with a nurse at the XUAR Hospital of Uyghur Medicine who confirmed that the statue, which she said was erected in late 2015 or early 2016 following the multi-year construction of a new 17-story main building on the hospital grounds, had been removed from the site as part of a “standardization” process for medical centers in the capital.

“It happened at the end of [2017],” she said. “Because we’re a large hospital, they were starting to reorganize things related to Uyghur medicine and Uyghur culture at the time.”

While the nurse said she was unaware of the reason for the statue’s removal, her use of the term “reorganize” suggests that it was part of an elimination drive by authorities.

‘A pioneer in Uyghur medicine’

RFA spoke with Mutellip Elihajim, who has served as the leader of a group conducting research on Uyghur medicine since relocating to Turkey from the XUAR in 2016, about Ghazibay and his contributions to the science.

According to Elihajim, everyone in the field of Uyghur medicine knows the figure of Ghazibay because his biography is considered so essential that it is the basis of a lesson in the curricula of medical schools.

“We introduced Ghazibay [to students] as a pioneer in Uyghur medicine,” said Elihajim, who before leaving Xinjiang for Turkey had worked in the field for more than 30 years, with stints teaching at the Hotan Prefectural

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Dr. Augusto Sola, Masimo VP of Medical Affairs for Neonatology, Honored by the American Academy of Pediatrics with Pioneer Award

Dr. Sola Pioneered New Protocol Using Masimo SET® Pulse Oximetry That Dramatically Reduced Blindness and Eye Damage in Neonates

Masimo (NASDAQ: MASI) announced today that Augusto Sola, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs for Neonatology at Masimo, has been awarded the 2020 Pioneer Award, Section of Neonatal Perinatal Medicine, by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The honor recognizes the groundbreaking achievements and contributions Dr. Sola has made, using his Masimo SET®-based protocol, to improve the health and well-being of newborn infants.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201019005215/en/

Dr. Augusto Sola (Photo: Business Wire)

Dr. Sola’s impressive career in neonatology has improved the lives of countless newborns in the U.S., Latin America, and across the world. Dr. Sola’s innovative research on oxygen administration and monitoring oxygen saturation in preterm infants has played a key role in reducing the rate of neonatal blindness (retinopathy of prematurity) and our understanding of the impact of various neonatal practices on the developing brain. Dr. Sola has published 130 original articles in peer-reviewed journals, 390 review articles, and 5 neonatology textbooks, as well as delivered more than 3,500 lectures to research and clinical groups around the world. Dr. Sola also founded the Ibero-American Society of Neonatology (SIBEN), dedicated to continuous quality improvement in neonatal care throughout the Americas.

Dr. Sola received his MD at Buenos Aires University School of Medicine and completed his Pediatric Residency and Chief Pediatric Residency at the University of Massachusetts, followed by a Neonatal Fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco. In neonatal practice since 1974, Dr. Sola has been Professor of Pediatrics at Buenos Aires University Medical School, the University of California, San Francisco, the University of California, Los Angeles, and Emory University. In addition to his position at Masimo, Dr. Sola continues to work directly with critically ill newborns.

Dr. Sola’s seminal work was done in 1998 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. The results, published in 2003 by Drs. Sola, Wright, and Chow, showed that using a new protocol with Masimo SET®, clinicians reduced ROP to nearly zero over five years.1 Dr. Sola and colleagues later showed at Emory that the protocol’s success depended on SET® technology, as the same protocol with a competing pulse oximeter did not reduce ROP.2 Dr. Sola’s work on the reduction of ROP through oxygen saturation targeting has now become the standard of care.3-5

Dr. Sergio Golombek, MD, MPH, Professor of Pediatrics at New York Medical College, Neonatologist, Ex-President of SIBEN, and AAP member, commented, “In 1952, a Chicago newspaper wrote: ‘The best friend a baby ever had,’ referring to pediatrician Isaac A. Abt, MD, FAAP (1867-1955), founder of the AAP and its first president in 1930. He was known as a leading clinician, academic, advocate, promoter, writer, and leader. I think this has been overcome by Dr. Sola, who is, in my opinion, the best friend of a baby and his or her parents

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