Man In Coma For 8 Years Wakes Up Minutes After Doctors Give Him Sleeping Pill

A man, who was in a coma for nearly a decade, regained full consciousness and started to walk, minutes after a doctor gave him a sleeping pill.

The man, identified as 37-year-old Richard, was hospitalized in his late 20s after he choked on a piece of meat which left him with severe brain damage. He suffered from akinetic mutism, a condition in which a person cannot move or speak.

After eight years, the doctors discovered that certain types of brain damage could be temporarily cured by sleeping pills. With his family’s permission, the pill, Zolpidem, was administered and within 20 minutes of taking it, the man woke up and also asked the nurse how he can operate the wheelchair.

“Because Richard’s situation seemed hopeless, the family and I decided to administer this medication to Richard. Against all expectations, Zolpidem had remarkable effects. After taking the sleeping pill, Richard started talking, wanted to call his father, and started recognizing his brothers again. With some help, he could even get up from his wheelchair and walk short distances,” Doctoral student Willemijn van Erp at Radboud University told medical journal Cortex. 

Speaking about the decision to give him the sleeping pill, Dr. Hisse Arnts at Amsterdam UMC said, “Richard’s brain scans show overactivity in certain parts of the brain. This overactivity causes noise and somehow shuts down the “good” brain activity. We have discovered that administering this sleeping medication can suppress this unwanted brain overactivity, creating space for speech and movement.”

The medication’s effect, however, started wearing off after it was administered once a day for five days.

“The time windows during which the patient was able to talk and move got narrower, and his abilities to move and speak during these time windows decreased. The use of multiple doses of zolpidem during a single day showed no improvement in his clinical condition and sometimes even caused sedation,” Dr. Arnts told the journal. 

CT scan This a representational image showing doctors looking at CT scan in Bethesda, Maryland, Feb. 8, 2018. Photo: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

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Montgomery doctor sentenced to 15 years in federal prison in pill mill case

A former Montgomery physician has been sentenced to federal prison for convictions on drug distribution, health care fraud and money laundering.

Richard A. Stehl, 60, was sentenced Friday to 15 years, according to a joint statement Monday by Middle District of Alabama U.S. Attorney Louis V. Franklin Sr., DEA Assistant Special Agent in Charge Sean Stephen, HHS-OIG Special Agent in Charge Derrick L. Jackson, and Alabama State Board of Medical Examiners Executive Director William Perkins.

Stehl was convicted in December 2019 on 94 counts of unlawfully distributing controlled substances, two counts of health care fraud, and five counts of money laundering.

The trial evidence showed that from 2010 through 2018, Stehl operated a medical practice, Healthcare on Demand. For most of that time, the practice was located at 201 Winton M. Blount Loop in Montgomery—just off of Taylor Road.

At his practice, Stehl prescribed addictive, controlled substances—including hydrocodone cough syrup, Adderall, Xanax, Klonopin, Valium, and Ativan—despite knowing no legitimate medical purposes existed to support these prescriptions.

During the trial, the jury heard from ten of Stehl’s former patients. Each patient received multiple controlled substances prescriptions from Stehl. Several of the patients either developed addictions while seeing Stehl or had existing addictions worsened as a result of the supposed medical treatment Stehl provided.

One patient testified she would wait four hours to see Stehl and, by the time she made it to the examination room, she would demand that Stehl give her a prescription and let her leave—which he would then do. Another described driving more than four hours to see Stehl because she knew that Stehl would give her the drugs that she wanted. A third patient stated that Stehl gave her routine steroid injections—even though she reported to Stehl that she was allergic to steroids. After receiving several injections from Stehl, this patient wound up in the hospital.

At Friday’s sentencing hearing, U.S. District Judge Terry F. Moorer emphasized the harm that Stehl inflicted upon his patients, the fact that he prioritized profit over patient care, and Stehl’s complete lack of remorse as grounds for imposing the 15-year sentence.

The Drug Enforcement Agency and Health and Human Services-Office of the Inspector General investigated this case. They were aided by the Internal Revenue Service-Criminal Investigation Division. Additionally, the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency, the Millbrook Police Department, the Opelika Police Department, the Montgomery Police Department, the Alabama Board of Medical Examiners, and the United States Marshals Service all assisted in the investigation. Assistant United States Attorneys Jonathan S. Ross, Alice LaCour, and Megan Kirkpatrick prosecuted the case.

“The criminal conduct that occurred under the guise of Stehl’s medical practice was appalling,” stated Franklin said. “Stehl caused his patients to become addicted to powerful controlled substances all in the name of profit. In doing so, he inflicted immeasurable harm in the lives of his patients and his patients’ loved ones. The significant sentence imposed in this case reflects a just reward for Stehl’s drug dealing.”

“Stehl was the kingpin of taking advantage

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The Truth About Those ‘Shark Tank’ Keto Pill Advertisements You Keep Seeing

Photo credit: Courtesy of Getty / Lori Grenier via Twitter
Photo credit: Courtesy of Getty / Lori Grenier via Twitter

From Good Housekeeping

  • A few of Shark Tank‘s business moguls have been targeted by fake advertisements for Keto diet pills products that have never appeared on the show.

  • Lori Grenier and Mark Cuban have directly appealed to the public to avoid falling prey to these scams.

  • Keto-related products have rarely ever appeared on the ABC program, and Grenier said she has “never done a Keto or diet product, ever.”

Shark Tank has been a platform for thousands upon thousands of products, some of which the series’ diehard fans would say seem almost too good to be true. The major commercial success associated with the show (which Inc. reports can be worth double or triple a company’s revenue in a single year) has pushed more inventors, brands, and businesses to seek endorsement from one of the shows’ stars. And when a product is just too outlandish to appear on the show, some entrepreneurs will simply fake an endorsement — which is the case for a whole suite of Ketogenic diet products, including some of which actually steal Lori Grenier’s image to be used on social media.

As reported by fact checkers at Snopes.com, there have been many digital advertisements for Keto diet pills that purport that the product has appeared on Shark Tank. Some even claim to have been funded or personally endorsed by the business moguls featured on Shark Tank while pitching on the show. The pills are billed as a supplement to help boost weight loss for those working their way through the Keto diet, a targeted program that pushes one’s metabolism to process fat (or, to reach ketosis) as the main source of energy, as opposed to carbohydrates like sugar.

But viewers may be surprised to learn that there have only been a few instances when a Keto-related product has crossed the Shark Tank stage — and none have ever secured an investment from one of the show’s main “Sharks.”

A brand called Nui first appeared on Shark Tank in 2018 to seek investment in their Keto-friendly cookie product that skipped added sugar but doubled down on saturated fats. During the episode, guest investor and sports icon Alex Rodriguez ended up sinking a $300,000 investment into the cookie, according to CNBC. In another episode in 2018, a brand known as the Honest Keto Diet tried seeking investment for a supplement that supposedly helped Keto dieters maintain ketosis without strictly observing required sugar limitations that the diet is famous for. The product didn’t earn an investment from any of the show’s stars, but blogs like The Health Radar believe the appearance allowed fraudulent businesses to start pedaling fake ads.

Fake advertisements for “Shark Tank Keto pills” have even caught the eye of the Better Business Bureau, as officials found that one product used images “taken from a separate Shark Tank episode that does not mention PureFit KETO. “Some advertisements have even gone as far to manipulate

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