Sydney dentist Peter Carr performed surgery on female patient while his genitals were exposed

A Sydney dentist who was found guilty of indecently assaulting a young dental nurse also performed surgery on a patient with his genitals exposed.

Peter David Carr, 76, is currently suspended from practice but is now facing disciplinary action by the Health Care Complaints Commission (HCCC), including the cancellation of his registration.

The New South Wales Civil and Administrative Tribunal (NCAT) found the dentist guilty of unsatisfactory and unethical conduct for working with his genitals exposed and tying another patient’s wrists and ankles together with computer cables.

Details of his conduct at the Smile Care Dental practice in Double Bay were released by the tribunal this week.

It included an incident in May 2016 in which he performed surgery while his genitals, “namely his semi-erect penis and testicles, were inappropriately exposed and hanging out of his jeans zipper”.

A younger female dental nurse noticed his physical state after picking an item off the floor, seeing his genitals protruding under his dental gown.

Documents showed Dr Carr explained his version of the incident to the Dental Council of NSW several months later, stating he may have forgotten to secure his trouser buttons after going to the bathroom in a hurry and was most likely not wearing underpants.

A man wearing glasses walks on a red carpet
Peter Carr was found guilty of performing surgery with his genitals out of his trousers.(Instagram)

The tribunal also found him guilty over a separate incident in November 2016 in which he administered a female patient with the drug Triazolam, including one dose which was inhaled through her nose from a rolled-up banknote.

He also tied his patient’s wrists and legs together with computer cables before a procedure to fit the patient with 10 veneers.

In response, Dr Carr stated the patient requested her hands and legs to be tied together as she would be more comfortable.

The hearing was told Dr Carr also lacked adequate training to safely administer Triazolam and failed to identify that the patient had previously taken another drug, Stilnox.

In relation to his previous convictions, the tribunal found Dr Carr also failed to notify the Dental Board of Australia within seven days, after being charged and found guilty for being in possession of cocaine at a Darlinghurst nightclub in February 2016.

Dr Carr was given a good behaviour bond for cocaine possession.

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In 2018 he was also convicted of a string of offences for three separate incidents in 2016 including pushing his dental nurse against a wall while attempting to kiss her, slapping her buttocks with his hand and opening her scrubs after forcefully grabbing her shoulder.

Dr

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Women testify of trust placed in gynecologist who prosecutors say performed unnecessary procedures

The surgeries started that year and ended only in 2015. Each time, her handwritten medical chart reported that she had complained of pelvic and back pain, bad cramps, frequent and long periods, or something growing in her vagina.

The woman was asked whether she had ever suffered those symptoms. “I never said that,” she answered again and again. She was the latest of Perwaiz’s patients to share their experiences with a doctor prosecutors say performed unnecessary procedures over the course of a decade as part of a scam to fund his lavish lifestyle.

Perwaiz faces 61 fraud counts that cover 25 patients, most of whom he saw from 2015 to 2019. Prosecutors have not said how many others were victims. So many women came forward after his arrest in November that the FBI created a website about the case for them.

When the patient asked Perwaiz why she needed surgery, she said he replied that there was an abnormal growth in her uterus that could be cancer. “I was told this lump will keep on growing each time it was removed,” she testified. “If I do not take care of this, then it would spread very rapidly and cause cancer.”

He operated in 2006, 2007, 2010, 2012 and 2015. During the 2012 surgery, he performed a hysterectomy, removing her uterus and left ovary but leaving her right ovary intact. In 2015, according to her testimony, she voiced no complaints during her checkup, but Perwaiz told her she needed another surgery. This time, he removed her remaining ovary.

Each time he told her that surgery was necessary, she believed him. “He’s my doctor,” she told jurors. “I have to trust him.” M.C. was among the patients who testified that they trusted Perwaiz when he told them they needed invasive procedures over the years.

Like patients, health insurers also trusted him.

He billed them hundreds of thousands of dollars for phantom medical procedures, according to his indictment.

He billed for hysteroscopies, a procedure used to view inside a woman’s uterus during examinations, during times when either the scope was broken or he did not have the other materials in his office to perform the procedure, prosecutors allege. They contend he billed for colposcopies, a procedure to view the cervix, and wrote abnormal findings on patients’ charts even though he didn’t use the solution that would allow him to see those abnormalities. And they say he billed for unnecessary hysterectomies.

Prosecutors also contend that Perwaiz often induced labor for pregnant patients before they were due on Saturdays at Chesapeake Regional Medical Center, where he scheduled surgeries, so he could earn money making deliveries.

Between 2010 and 2019, Perwaiz billed insurance companies more than $2.3 million for gynecological care partially justified by diagnostic procedures he never performed, prosecutors allege in the indictment. In testimony earlier in the trial, an investigator for Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield said that, over a decade, more than 41 percent of Perwaiz’s patients had surgical procedures compared with 7.6

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