OKC Dentist Working With On-Site Lab to Bring Patients Best in Cosmetic Dentistry

OKLAHOMA CITY, Dec. 2, 2020 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — Providing the highest quality, longest lasting and most honest dentistry available has been a commitment of OKC dentist Dr. Chris Saxon’s since he began practicing dentistry. He is keeping this commitment by providing his patients with an on-site dental lab. This allows Dr. Saxon and his team at Saxon Dentistry to work hand in hand with the lab specialists to ensure an outstanding level of quality and service.

The Saxon Dentistry Difference

In most practices, the standard procedure is to outsource your dental lab needs. These typically include dentures, dental crowns, porcelain veneers, implant restorations and more. While convenient and often less expensive for dentists, quality and precision are often compromised. With Saxon Dentistry, this is kept on-site, ensuring greater quality control, accuracy of fit and most importantly, higher patient satisfaction.

When patients embark on full smile makeovers, dental implants, porcelain veneers and even a single crown, they are putting a lot of trust in their dentist. This trust is not taken lightly at Saxon Dentistry. The on-site lab utilizes top tier dental materials, advanced technology and employs skilled, meticulous technicians. Combining this with Dr. Saxon’s expertise allows for predictable, high quality outcomes.

When teaming up with the on-site dental lab specialist, Dr. Saxon can bring them directly into the room with the patient and together listen to the patient’s concerns. Without an on-site lab, dentists have to relay information to their labs via phone call or email. Details get lost in translation, and details matter greatly when customizing a smile for patients. Sometimes the most minor adjustment can have the biggest impact.

Smile Makeovers OKC

Dr. Saxon has a particular passion for making dentistry beautiful and natural. His keen eye for detail can make any dental restoration, from a single cracked tooth repair to dental veneers to full mouth dental implants, blend seamlessly into a smile. This has made him a highly sought after OKC cosmetic dentist and implant dentist.

“When dentistry is done to the highest level, no one should be able to detect that you’ve had dental work completed.”

He believes in meeting patients exactly where they are in life, understanding their goals and setting forth the appropriate treatment from there. There is no one size fits all dentistry in his office. Personalized care is not only necessary; it’s what every patient deserves that walks through a dentist’s door.

Get to Know Oklahoma City Native, Dr. Chris Saxon

Dr. Saxon is a native of Oklahoma City and a graduate of Putnam City North high school. He received his doctorate from the University of Oklahoma College Of Dentistry. He takes between 100-150 hours of continuing education every year, far exceeding the Oklahoma Board of Dentistry’s requirements.

Dr. Saxon is committed to giving back to the local community. One way he does this is by being an Oklahoma Mission of Mercy participant. Dr. Saxon is an avid golfer, cyclist and kite boarder, but his greatest joy comes from spending time with

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Michigan Medicine restricts visitors for adult patients as COVID-19 cases climb

ANN ARBOR – Michigan Medicine has updated its visitor policy with tightened restrictions in order to keep patients and staff safe as COVID-19 cases surge around the state.

As of Wednesday, no visitors will be permitted with adult patients in the health system’s hospitals, unless medically necessary.

Exceptions to the new restrictions include end-of-life care, labor and delivery and other scenarios which are listed here.

According to Michigan Medicine, the new policy change includes restrictions already announced:

  • No visitors are allowed with adult emergency department patients, except when medically necessary.
  • At C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, two visitors are allowed for pediatric patients. But family and other visitors are required to wear a mask (covering their mouth and nose) at all Michigan Medicine properties. This includes in a patient room and throughout the facility. Patients who can tolerate a mask must wear one when a health care worker is present in their room.
  • In clinics, no visitors will be allowed for adult patients unless the patient has a cognitive or physical impairment that requires assistance. One primary caregiver is allowed to accompany each pediatric patient to an appointment, unless an additional aide or assistant is required.

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“COVID-19 transmission rates continue to climb in the community,” Laraine Washer, Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology said in a statement. “Our top priority is the safety of our patients and staff, and to minimize the spread of disease, we need to take this additional step.

“We know this is difficult for our patients and their families and friends. But we need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients.”

Since the pandemic began in March, Michigan Medicine has been taking steps to keep staff and patients safe, including screening patients for symptoms, cleaning and disinfecting facilities, moving furniture to observe social distancing and following the latest guidelines to minimize infections.

“Limiting the risk of transmission of infection has always been a critical priority at Michigan Medicine,” Washer said in a statement. “And I want to reassure the public that if you need health care for a new problem or for continuing care of a chronic problem, you should not put it off.

“We have teams dedicated to keeping our patients and staff safe in our buildings. It is important to not delay emergency or chronic care.”

Washer urged people to avoid Thanksgiving gatherings this year with those outside your household.

“The best advice to limit risk is to continue to avoid gathering with people outside your household even if it is Thanksgiving,” she said in a statement. “If you are reporting to work, don’t have potlucks or share meals in close proximity with your co-workers: you can’t eat without taking off your mask, and that brief period of not wearing a mask could be enough to open the door to disease spread.

“We need everyone’s help with this. A large surge of

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UW Medicine to reschedule some procedures; hospitals agree to share surge of COVID-19 patients

Responding to a surge in COVID-19 caseloads, UW Medicine has decided to postpone surgeries that are not urgent but would require hospitalization afterward, according to an internal email and confirmed by a spokesperson. 

UW Medicine’s action comes as Washington state’s hospitals earlier this week reached an agreement on how to handle the ongoing rise of COVID-19 patients statewide — committing to one another that “no hospital will go into crisis standards alone.” 

Crisis standards are when hospitals are so overwhelmed they cannot provide the typical standard of care, and they are left to triage resources and decide who will receive treatment and who will be left to die. 

The hospitals’ commitment — which expand on agreements reached before the first surge of COVID-19 in spring — says all of the state’s acute care hospitals will make “concrete plans” to scale back on elective procedures as needed, reserve intensive care units for COVID-19 or emergency cases, and readily accept patient transfers from other parts of the state.

It aims to ensure hospitals will work closely with one another and communicate to prevent individual facilities from becoming overwhelmed when others have capacity.  

“It’s essentially to try to manage — all across the system — the capacity,” said Cassie Sauer, of the Washington State Hospital Association (WSHA), which convened a videoconference Monday for the state’s hospital leaders. “In the places that have gone to crisis standards, those doctors and nurses, I’m not sure their soul will ever be the same.” 

Sauer said hospitals hope to create more slack in the system by collaborating closely together and establishing clear communication. Hospitals must document if they deny the transfer of a patient and inform their chief executive officer if a transfer is denied. 

Statewide, as of 4 p.m. Friday, 78% of acute care beds were occupied, according to WSHA. Nearly 84% of intensive care unit (ICU) beds and almost 75% of the ICU beds in airborne infection isolation rooms were in use — numbers higher than two weeks ago.

Sauer said many Washington hospitals, including UW Medicine and Swedish, are beginning to more aggressively scale back on elective procedures.  

“All non-urgent patients who need to occupy a bed [post-operation] for any length of time will be rescheduled,” wrote UW Medical Center CEO Cindy Hecker and Harborview Medical Center CEO Paul Hayes in a message to colleagues Nov. 19. The rescheduling will begin Nov. 23 and continue through Feb. 1, according to the message.  

Procedures for outpatients and in urgent or emergent cases will continue, Hecker and Hayes wrote. 

UW Medicine spokesperson Susan Gregg said the hospital system is “actively contacting” patients whose surgeries will be postponed. 

“Each individual case is being reviewed based on medical urgency and whether the patient would need to be hospitalized after the surgery,” Gregg said in a statement Friday.  

UW Medicine was caring for 77 COVID-19 patients across its campuses as of Thursday. On Oct. 1, the hospital system was caring for 20.  

Dr. Elizabeth Wako, chief medical officer at

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Lynnwood dentist says stress of COVID is grinding on patients, but routine care remains vital

Stress from the coronavirus pandemic has people gnashing their teeth and avoiding dental care.

LYNNWOOD, Wash. — The dentist’s office was a scary place for many people long before the coronavirus pandemic. For some, it’s even scarier now. 

People are avoiding dentists because they worry it isn’t safe — and that’s creating another set of health issues. 

The ongoing global pandemic is quite literally grinding people down to their breaking point.

“This patient said she started to notice herself clenching and grinding,” said Dr. Bradley Jonnes of Lynnwood’s Cedar View Dental, pointing to an X-ray. “She actually broke the tooth off at the gum line.”

Jonnes said, prior to the pandemic, he’d see a broken tooth every couple of weeks. Now he sees several a week.

“People come in and I ask them what changed, and they say, ‘Look at the world! It’s stress. I’m definitely clenching and grinding now.'”

Fear of contracting COVID-19 also has people putting off check-ups, turning small problems into big ones. Routine cavities can become root canals.

After dental offices across the country were completely shut down at the beginning of the pandemic, the American Dental Association changed its policy, designating check-ups as “essential” services.

When asked whether a check-up truly is “essential,” Jonnes responded, “That’s an interesting question. Sometimes we do a check-up and we find a lot more, so we can prevent a lot more. In some cases, it saves people time and money and pain and hassle by doing that check-up. We screen for oral cancer and other issues. We never know what we’re going to find until we get in there.”

Washington state is now allowing dentists to operate as they did prior to the pandemic with additional requirements, including screening of patients for symptoms and thorough cleaning of facilities.

Though not required, Jonnes uses a hand-held fogger to coat his office with a natural disinfectant every day.

He wears both an N95 and additional surgical mask during each procedure. A hospital grade air purification system filters the air in the office every 15 minutes.

“The good thing is, we now have a track record,” said Jonnes. “When we were first opening, we didn’t know how COVID and dentistry would be affected. Talking with my colleagues, the American Dental Association and the national association, we can see dental offices have been safe.”

The American Dental Association reports less than 1% of the nation’s 200,000 dentists have tested positive for coronavirus, compared to more than 200,000 health care workers who have been infected.

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New Northwestern Medicine location provides patients local access to highest level of thoracic surgery care

Patients in Chicago’s northwest suburbs now have local access to the surgery team that performs state-of-the-art minimally invasive and robotic chest surgery, treatment for cancers of lung and esophagus, and lung transplantation at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

Dr. Ankit Bharat, who performed the United States’ first double lung transplant on a patient with COVID-19, began to see patients in McHenry on Oct. 20.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

The new office location at Northwestern Medicine McHenry Hospital will be open to patients who have diseases of the chest, including the airways, lungs, esophagus, diaphragm and chest wall. Bharat and his surgical partners will receive referrals from medical oncologists, pulmonologists and other physicians who care for patients in the McHenry County area.

“Our goal is to provide unparalleled care of the highest quality to our patients, close to home,” Bharat said. “We are committed to providing the entire gamut of treatments for both simple and complex problems in the chest.”

“Our patients can have appointments and follow-up care in McHenry, and if they need specialized surgeries we perform them in Chicago. This approach provides patients the best of both worlds — convenience for appointments and access to highly advanced surgeries when they’re needed.”

Nick Rave, president of Northwestern Medicine McHenry Hospital, said patients will benefit from the relationships between the physicians and hospital teams.

“Our patients want the peace of mind that they’re doing all they can to address their health issues,” Rave said. “By bringing these experienced thoracic surgeons to McHenry, we’re making it easier for people who are already balancing family life, work and a health diagnosis.”

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

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More US patients to have easy, free access to doctor’s notes

More U.S. patients will soon have free, electronic access to the notes their doctors write about them under a new federal requirement for transparency.

Many health systems are opening up records Monday, the original deadline. At the last minute, federal health officials week gave an extension until April because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Britta Bloomquist of Duluth, Minnesota, has been reading her clinical notes for years, first struggling through red tape and more recently clicking into a secure online patient website.

“It means information about your care can no longer be hidden from you. And you have a say in your care,” said Bloomquist, 32, who has a rare type of arthritis that took years to diagnose.

WHAT’S CHANGING?

Patients have long had a right to their medical records, including doctor notes, but obtaining them could mean filling out requests, waiting for a response and paying fees. A 2016 law said delays and barriers must be removed.

If you already use a patient portal such as MyChart to email your doctor or schedule an appointment, you may soon see new options allowing you to view your doctor’s notes and see your test results as soon as they are available. You may get an email explaining where to look, how to share access with a caregiver and how to keep other eyes off your information.

Many people won’t notice a change. About 15% of health care systems already are letting patients read doctor notes online without charge. That means about 53 million patients already have access to their doctor’s notes.

WILL THIS HELP ME?

Studies have shown that patients who read their notes understand more about their health, take their medications as prescribed more often and feel more in control of their care.

That’s true for Bloomquist. Diagnosed with a rare type of arthritis called ankylosing spondylitis, she had extensive surgery to straighten her right leg in 2018. She gets regular drug infusions and sees multiple specialists. It’s a lot to remember.

“I’ve become a health nerd,” Bloomquist said. “Reading the notes has kept me on the same page as my providers about what’s going on.”

WILL I UNDERSTAND THE JARGON?

You may have to look up terms. Or ask you doctor to translate at your next visit. And doctor’s notes tend to use abbreviations. “SOB” means short of breath, by the way. “BS” can mean bowel sounds.

And brace yourself if your weight is an issue.

“I’m a heavy-set person, OK? And their favorite word to use is obese,” said Rosie Bartel, 71, of Chilton, Wisconsin. “You have to get used to that. Doctors use that word.”

To Bartel, who became more involved in her care after getting an infection in the hospital, reading notes means she’s doing what she can to prevent errors and stay healthy.

“I don’t have to remember everything said to me in a 15-minute appointment,” she said.

WHAT IF I SPOT AN ERROR?

Patients do find mistakes in their notes and some errors

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More US Patients to Have Easy, Free Access to Doctor’s Notes | Political News

By CARLA K. JOHNSON, AP Medical Writer

More U.S. patients will soon have free, electronic access to the notes their doctors write about them under a new federal requirement for transparency.

Many health systems are opening up records Monday, the original deadline. At the last minute, federal health officials week gave an extension until April because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Britta Bloomquist of Duluth, Minnesota, has been reading her clinical notes for years, first struggling through red tape and more recently clicking into a secure online patient website.

“It means information about your care can no longer be hidden from you. And you have a say in your care,” said Bloomquist, 32, who has a rare type of arthritis that took years to diagnose.

Patients have long had a right to their medical records, including doctor notes, but obtaining them could mean filling out requests, waiting for a response and paying fees. A 2016 law said delays and barriers must be removed.

If you already use a patient portal such as MyChart to email your doctor or schedule an appointment, you may soon see new options allowing you to view your doctor’s notes and see your test results as soon as they are available. You may get an email explaining where to look, how to share access with a caregiver and how to keep other eyes off your information.

Many people won’t notice a change. About 15% of health care systems already are letting patients read doctor notes online without charge. That means about 53 million patients already have access to their doctor’s notes.

Studies have shown that patients who read their notes understand more about their health, take their medications as prescribed more often and feel more in control of their care.

That’s true for Bloomquist. Diagnosed with a rare type of arthritis called ankylosing spondylitis, she had extensive surgery to straighten her right leg in 2018. She gets regular drug infusions and sees multiple specialists. It’s a lot to remember.

“I’ve become a health nerd,” Bloomquist said. “Reading the notes has kept me on the same page as my providers about what’s going on.”

WILL I UNDERSTAND THE JARGON?

You may have to look up terms. Or ask you doctor to translate at your next visit. And doctor’s notes tend to use abbreviations. “SOB” means short of breath, by the way. “BS” can mean bowel sounds.

And brace yourself if your weight is an issue.

“I’m a heavy-set person, OK? And their favorite word to use is obese,” said Rosie Bartel, 71, of Chilton, Wisconsin. “You have to get used to that. Doctors use that word.”

To Bartel, who became more involved in her care after getting an infection in the hospital, reading notes means she’s doing what she can to prevent errors and stay healthy.

“I don’t have to remember everything said to me in a 15-minute appointment,” she said.

Patients do find mistakes in their notes and some errors are serious enough to affect their care,

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How Drug Imports Can Endanger Patients

KEY POINTS

  • There is no mechanism in place to regulate the quality of drugs imported by American patients. 
  • A 2017 study by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy found that three-quarters of online pharmacies claiming to sell Canadian drugs actually sourced their products from places like India, Singapore, and Hong Kong, all major suppliers of counterfeits. 
  • The FDA acknowledges that it is “unable to estimate the cost savings” from President Trump’s new plan.

I was diagnosed with HIV just shy of my 30th birthday. That day, everything changed. I was apprehensive about my prognosis, my treatment plan, and my ability to live a normal life.

Fortunately, medical advances have turned HIV from a certain death sentence into a manageable condition. Still, like all Americans who depend on complex medications to stay healthy, I worry about high drug prices, and this concern has only intensified amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Especially since some of the proposed “solutions” to high drug prices would put patients’ health at risk.

Just recently, the Trump administration announced that it would allow states to import prescription medications from Canada with the aim of saving money for consumers. Doing so, though, could expose millions of Americans to counterfeit drugs, while achieving little in the way of savings.

I’ve seen firsthand how importation schemes can put patients at risk.

Shortly after learning I was HIV-positive, I ordered my anti-retroviral drugs from an online Canadian pharmacy. For two months, I received medications via mail without ever wondering where they were sourced or whether they contained the active ingredients I needed to keep me alive.

Then my doctor intervened. She told me that drugs purchased through online storefronts are often adulterated or counterfeit—in fact, the global trade in fake medicines is a $30 billion-a-year business. Unknowingly, I had been rolling the dice with my health.

There are two types of counterfeit drugs. The first contains potentially deadly substances—everything from arsenic to antifreeze. The second contains few, if any, active ingredients. Though pills in the latter category don’t contain actual poisons, they can be just as deadly.  Anti-retroviral drugs have to be taken exactly as prescribed; missing even a few doses can allow the virus to reemerge.

There is no mechanism in place to regulate the quality of drugs imported by American patients. A senior official at Health Canada explicitly told the US surgeon general that her agency “does not assure that products being sold to U.S. citizens are safe, effective, and of high quality.” The FDA, meanwhile, plainly states that it “cannot ensure the safety and effectiveness of drugs that it has not approved.”

Moreover, drugs purportedly from Canada could come from anywhere. A 2017 study by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy found that three-quarters of online pharmacies claiming to sell Canadian drugs actually sourced their products from places like India, Singapore, and Hong Kong, all major suppliers of counterfeits. Back in 2005, the FDA reported that only 15% of imported drugs marketed as Canadian actually originated in

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Here are the hospitals with the highest rate of COVID patients

Health workers wearing full personal protective equipment (PPE) on the intensive care unit (ICU) at Whiston Hospital in Merseyside as they continue deal with the increasing number of coronavirus patients. (Photo by Peter Byrne/PA Images via Getty Images)
Health workers wearing full personal protective equipment (PPE) on the intensive care unit (ICU) at Whiston Hospital in Merseyside. (Getty)

Several hospitals across England have seen the number of coronavirus admissions surge past levels seen in the first wave of the pandemic, newly released data shows.

Statistics compiled by Public Health England (PHE), shown to cabinet ministers last week ahead of Saturday’s lockdown announcement, shows there are currently scores of hospitals dealing with over 100 COVID positive inpatients.

The graph shows that the number of coronavirus patients at Doncaster and Bassetlaw Trust in Yorkshire and Blackpool Hospital Trust exceeded their first wave peak on 19 October.

Liverpool University Hospital Foundation Trust was next worst hit, with patients passing the highest first wave levels a day later on 20 October.

A Public Health England heat map shows hospital admissions for COVID have risen sharply. (PHE)
A Public Health England heat map shows hospital admissions for COVID have risen sharply. (PHE)
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks during a virtual press conference inside 10 Downing Street in central London on October 31, 2020 to announce new lockdown restrictions in an effort to curb rising infections of the novel coronavirus. - UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Saturday announced a new four-week coronavirus lockdown across England, a dramatic strategy shift following warnings hospitals would become overwhelmed under his current system of localised restrictions. (Photo by Alberto Pezzali / POOL / AFP) (Photo by ALBERTO PEZZALI/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
The PM announced a second nationwide lockdown on Saturday. (Getty)

Several other hospitals, mainly in the north of England, have reported exceedingly high levels of coronavirus in the past week.

In total, 24 hospitals reported COVID patient levels at over half their previous peak during the first wave of the pandemic.

Read more: ‘Terrifying’ projections and concern over NHS capacity at heart of push for new lockdown

On Friday, figures released by the government showed that more than 10,000 Covid-19 patients are now being treated in hospitals across the UK.

But the number has yet to reach the 20,000 seen at the height of the first wave of the pandemic earlier this year.

Liverpool University Hospitals Foundation Trust had the highest number of beds occupied by coronavirus patients in England on Tuesday at 450, according to NHS England data.

Watch: Starmer blasts delay in imposing second nationwide lockdown

Pennine Acute Hospitals Trust in Greater Manchester was second on the list with 290 inpatients.

In Nottinghamshire, which has been subject to Tier 3 lockdown restrictions, the number of hospitalisations is 40 per cent higher than those seen in April.

And in Greater Manchester, most hospital trusts there will reportedly exceed their critical care capacity by next week due to high COVID-19 hospital admissions.

The county’s public health director Jonathan Gribbin said “even a well-organised NHS and care system will struggle to cope” with the sharp rise in patients in the county’s hospitals.

It comes as advisors from the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) said on Friday that England has breached its “reasonable worst-case” scenario for COVID-19 infections and hospital admissions.

Sage also warned that the number of daily deaths in England is in line with that scenario, but “is almost certain to exceed this within the next two weeks”.

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Europe’s hospitals could soon hit capacity with covid-19 patients

Germany, Europe’s best-resourced nation, risks being swamped even after increasing its intensive care beds by a quarter over the summer. Belgium, which had doubled its intensive care capacity, is now preparing for decisions about which needy patient should get a bed.

“This huge capacity we’ve built gave a false impression of security. It gave a higher buffer, but ultimately it only represents a week when you’re in an exponential phase,” said Emmanuel André, a leading Belgian virologist who has advised the government on the pandemic — and has bitterly criticized leaders for acting too slowly this fall.

In retrospect, the warning signs could be seen as early as July, when cases in Europe started ticking up again after the relaxation of spring lockdowns. In absolute terms, the numbers were still tiny. Spanish emergency room doctors enjoyed a respite, after being hammered in March and April. Italian nurses headed to the beach. Central European leaders — among the worst hit now, but back then largely untouched — gathered at the end of August for a triumphant conference to discuss the post-pandemic era.

But the math for exponential growth is as simple as it is scary. When two coronavirus cases double to four, and four cases double to eight, it doesn’t take long for the numbers to reach the tens of thousands — and beyond.

“An exponential phenomenon starts with very small numbers, and it is not tangible for weeks and weeks and weeks for people out there,” André said. “If you look at the numbers, you have very strong indicators early on that things are going wrong, but it is only at the very end that things explode.”

Europe is now feeling the explosion.

The continent reported 1.5 million cases over the past week, the highest yet during the pandemic, the World Health Organization’s Europe director, Hans Kluge, told an emergency meeting of health ministers on Thursday. Deaths rose by a third in seven days. Occupancy of intensive care units doubled in 17 days leading up to Oct. 25 in countries tracked by the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control.

“Europe is at the epicenter of this pandemic once again,” Kluge said.

A week ago, French intensive care beds were half full. Now, they are more than two-thirds occupied, with more than 3,100 covid-19 patients. When President Emmanuel Macron on Wednesday announced a second national lockdown — something he and other European leaders have sought mightily to avoid — he warned that “at this stage, we know that whatever we do, nearly 9,000 patients will be in intensive care by mid-November, which is almost the entirety of French capacities.”

Top public health leaders echoed his dire message.

“We are going to have two to three extremely difficult weeks for the health-care system,” Jean-François Delfraissy, the head of the scientific council that advises the French government on the pandemic, told France Inter radio on Thursday. “We can’t allow it to crack. We are in a worse situation than in the beginning

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