How to Be Part of Men’s Health’s Next Major Virtual Health & Fitness Event

Men’s Health’s virtual event, MH Weekenders, is coming soon, and it’s going to be big.

We don’t want to give much away yet, but throughout the whole of January some of the world’s biggest and most respected athletes and personalities will be taking part. From Saturday night cook-alongs, to in-depth interviews and discussions as well group workouts and challenges to take part in, this festival has something for everyone.

We’re going big with this, and we want you to take part. This is your chance to reach out to our digital audience of over 5 million people.

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What Are Men’s Health Virtual Events?

Unfortunately, getting together to get sweaty and debate the pressing issues in the world of health and fitness is not an option at the moment, which is why we’ve gone virtual.

Our events will take place over the last four weekends of January 2021 – Saturday 9th to Sunday January 31st – with each day comprising of four structured events that will be hosted on the Men’s Health YouTube channel. These videos will also be featured in digital articles and posted across menshealth.com/uk, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

The line-up will be announced in the coming weeks, so keep an eye out.

How You Can Get Involved

Of course, the line-up is not all we’re shouting about. We recognise that with such an event, this is a great opportunity for brands to showcase their products and services to our audience. So, we’ve devised a few new ways for you to reach them. Virtually, of course.

Register your brand

MH Weekenders Marketplace

The MH Weekenders Marketplace will offer businesses the chance to exhibit with us. On the final weekend of January, event attendees will be able to attend the online marketplace where they’ll be able to shop and receive discounts to their favourite health brands.

MH Weekenders E-Zine

As an event bonus, our registered attendees will receive our free e-zine ­– a digital event guide and marketplace electronic magazine, which will feature a selection of our favourite wellness brands.

If you’re a brand looking to get involved, sign up via the registration from below.

Register your brand


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Be Part of Women’s Health’s Next Virtual Health & Fitness Event

Women’s Health’s next virtual event is coming soon – and it’s going to be our biggest one ever.

Of course, we don’t want to give away too much just yet, but considering past events have seen tens of thousands of women tune in from the UK and beyond to work out with and hear talks by the likes of Jillian Michaels, Davina McCall and Kayla Itsines…

Well, you know this one is going to be *big*.

This time, we’re inviting brands to take part, and reach our audience – for starters, that’s a social media following of 1.4 million strong. Interest piqued? Here’s more info.

What are WH Virtual events?

While getting together to get sweaty is not an option, we connected with our audience in two groundbreaking virtual events in 2020.

In both, we’ve beamed fitness, health and wellness sensations like Jillian Michaels, Davina McCall, Kayla Itsines, Kelsey Wells, Dianne Buswell, Simone De La Rue and Jessica Skye straight into our readers’ living rooms for a series of thought-provoking interviews and star-studded workouts.

In our next virtual event – WH Weekenders – we’re looking to build on this incredible success.

What’s new this time?

We mentioned bigger, right? Instead of a two- or three-day event, our next virtual event will last four weeks.

Over the course of four weekends, we’ve scheduled in workouts with some of the world’s hottest trainers and celebs – but WH Weekenders is not all about getting sweaty.

Our audience will also be able to tune into fascinating panel talks with some of WH‘s editors and the UK’s top experts in fitness, health and wellness. We’re also spicing things up with several cook-alongs by top chefs, foodies and brands.

The line-up WH Weekenders will be announced in the coming weeks (and we can’t wait!)

Of course, the event length and line-up is not all we’re building on. We recognise that a big part of our in-person Women’s Health Live event was the opportunity for brands to showcase their products and services to our audience – so we’ve devised a few new ways for you to reach them. Virtually, of course.

1. WH Weekenders Marketplace

The first, our WH Weekenders Marketplace, will offer businesses the chance to exhibit with us. On the final weekend of January, event attendees will be able to attend our the online marketplace, where they’ll be able to shop and receive discounts to their favourite wellness brands.

2. WH Weekenders E-Zine

As an event bonus, our registered attendees will receive our free e-zine – a digital event guide and marketplace electronic magazine, which will feature a selection of our favourite wellness brands.

REGISTER YOUR BRAND

When + where is it happening?

The event will take place over the last 4 weekends of January 2021 – that’s Saturday 9 – Sunday 31 Jan.

The workouts, panel talks and cook-alongs will all be hosted on Women’s Health’s YouTube channel.

How to get involved

If you’re a band looking to get

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Science and medicine were part of my life | Times Online

Dinner table chats with her scientist-parents and hospital ward rounds with her Puncha, these were what inspired her, says Dr. Maheshi N. Ramasamy, Principal Investigator for the Oxford COVID-19 Vaccine Trial, in this interview with Kumudini Hettiarachchi

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Totally relaxed, she comes on Zoom on Wednesday – at the appointed hour of 12 Greenwich Meantime Time (GMT) in Oxford, England, and 5.30 p.m. in Sri Lanka.

No one would imagine that pretty Dr. Maheshi N. Ramasamy, who is quick to smile and chats leisurely, has been having a “crazy” time since the COVID-19 pandemic hit the world.

Dr. Ramasamy delivering a lecture on vaccines at the International Medical Conference of the Sri Lanka Medical Association (SLMA) last year in Colombo

For, 43-year-old Dr. Ramasamy is the Principal Investigator for the Oxford COVID-19 Vaccine Trial. Dubbing these  “exciting” times, she promptly reiterates that the very promising potential vaccine in the Oxford University/AstraZeneca pipeline is “very much a product of teamwork”. The Oxford vaccine will be manufactured by the British pharmaceutical company, AstraZeneca which has made a commitment to making the vaccine on a non-profit basis throughout the pandemic so that it could be distributed globally.

As the Oxford Vaccine Group hopes to put out another strong research paper on their vaccine trials in a week, the Sunday Times looks at the life of this eminent Sri Lankan who loves to come back to her motherland to spend time with family, mainly her four “lovely” cousins who are like her siblings and her ‘Puncha’ (mother’s sister) who is well-known Consultant Physician Dr. Anula Wijesundere.

Out of the ordinary has been only-child Maheshi’s childhood, as her scientist-parents Prof. Ranjan Ramasamy and Prof. Manthri Samaranayake Ramasamy crisscrossed the globe. Born in Colombo, her early years had been spent in Saudi Arabia and Kenya, then back in Sri Lanka and onto California, United States of America, when the country was gripped by communal violence in 1983, then to Brisbane in Australia and finally back to Colombo in 1989.

Dr. Ramasamy says that her mother and aunt were both proud stalwarts and Head Girls of Visakha Vidyalaya, but she was there only briefly, just 10 months, as soon as she began her formal school education. When she returned from Brisbane, she joined Stafford International School – as her “Sinhala was not good enough” to attend Visakha – and did both her OLs and ALs from there. She was awarded the Felix R. de Zoysa Memorial Academic Scholarship and was also the Head Prefect at Stafford International.

Dr. Maheshi Ramasamy in her Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

“I had a great time at Stafford, with its wonderful teachers and amazing Principal Noreen Welikala,” she says, while her family in Colombo was also very close. She and her cousins would be dropped off at school by her aunt in the mornings and they would all go to their grandparents’ home for lunch after school. Family dinners were also a regular occurrence, usually ending on a high note

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This Guy Carried a Full-Size Piano Up a Mountain as Part of a Fitness Stunt

A Welsh athlete has successfully carried a full-sized piano up Garth mountain in Wales. Extreme adventurer and fitness coach Max Glover hauled the 400-pound musical instrument up the 2-mile ascent on Sunday to raise money for the Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospital Charity.



a man that is standing in the grass: The Welsh fitness fanatic hauled 400lb uphill for charity


© Max Glover
The Welsh fitness fanatic hauled 400lb uphill for charity

The 33-year-old former Marine is no stranger to intense challenges, running a marathon in 2019 with a 1.7 ton car attached to his back. Having completed such a grueling test of endurance, he decided to take on another unconventional feat this year. “I have always been a bit different, I guess,” Glover told Runner’s World UK.

Determined to pursue his goal and to raise money for the hospital that supported his close friend, he began a strength training program last year. The strict plan entailed “squats, Romanian deadlifts, farmers walks, weighted step-ups and other similar compound exercises.” When lockdown restricted access to gyms, Glover relocated his training to outdoor spaces.

“I just carried heavy things in a backpack and just kept increasing the weight and walking up hills,” he reveals. “I bought a bergen (infantry rucksack) as I know they can handle a lot of weight and put dumbbells in there to take to the field or park.”



Jaime Ordóñez sitting on a bench: Man Carries Full-Sized Piano Up Mountain


© Max Glover
Man Carries Full-Sized Piano Up Mountain

Glover was faced with a series of obstacles throughout this training period, including injury and illness. His preparation was thwarted by Achilles pain in July and a sudden onset of poor health in the two weeks prior to the event.

Gallery: 5 Moves for a Stronger Butt That You Can Do Right Now (Eat This, Not That!)

Rather than demotivating him, these adversities only pushed him harder to accomplish his goal. “I think being in the Marines was the foundation for having the strength of mind and determination to complete something like this,” he says.

Accompanied by a small group of supporters called “Team Lungs,” he reached the summit in 3 hours and 45 minutes. After removing the weight from his back and gulping down a well-earned coffee, the victorious athlete and his crew were treated to a beautiful piano performance from a little girl.

“It was one of those magic moments,’ Glover says. ‘How many kids can say they played a real piano on the top of a mountain?!” To support Glover’s cause, you can donate here.

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Council Post: Adapting To The Digitization Of Fitness: Part I

Fortune 100 VP | Silicon Valley Executive | Founder of BestBox.co | Growth Advisor | Author of The Digital Intrapreneur | CoachTony.ca

The way most people were exposed to or became involved in fitness in the past was pretty cut and dry. Physical gyms and classes were the primary drivers of the industry. Sure, there were niche apps and home programs that worked for some, but arguably only a fraction. In light of the Covid-19 pandemic, however, I believe the industry has changed not only significantly but permanently. 

Earlier this year, I wrote an article titled “Putting Your Fitness Business On The Digital Road Map,” and over the last six months, there has been a veritable explosion of digital growth in this sector. From banner brands all the way down to small-town gyms, fitness professionals have had to get smarter and more agile to deliver the kind of digital fitness experience consumers are demanding during this unprecedented time in our global history.

Big Players Making Moves In The Digital Fitness Market

The way I see it, there is no bigger signal of this seismic shift than a company like Apple entering the marketplace. Apple is one of the largest companies in the world, and it carries on its back a metric ton of consumer influence, choice and perception. The company recently launched its virtual fitness application, Apple Fitness+, available on the Apple Watch and iPad products.

In a similar vein, Lululemon — a company that has largely operated as a clothing business — recently purchased the at-home fitness company Mirror, which sells smart mirrors that stream home workout classes. The company has already upped its projections for Mirror’s profits in this fiscal year, from $100 million to $150 million.

Spin giant Peloton has seen sales explode in the fourth quarter, 172% over last year, with subscriber numbers up 113%. Demand for at-home and digital-ready fitness is high, and its supply chain is struggling to keep up. When companies of this size are driving digital innovation at this level, it’s a clear signal that we’ve crossed into new territory.

Spikes In Mergers And Acquisitions

Anytime we see increased activity around mergers or acquisitions in an industry, it’s a sign that things are shifting. Perhaps it is consolidation because everyone is running out of money. Or, more likely to be the case right now, it’s the breakneck speed of growth — everyone is buying each other up in the hopes of being the one to lead the pack.

In 2019, Mindbody, a technology platform for health and fitness companies, was acquired for just under $2 billion. And earlier this year, Eric Roza, a tech entrepreneur with extensive experience in the software and digital space, acquired CrossFit. I believe this acquisition will bring a renewed focus on increasing digital developments in a company that was already trending up before the pandemic began.

Another company in this space, Zwift, allows runners and bikers to exercise in a simulated 3D world via its online

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Santa actors were offered early vaccine as part of scrapped federal PSA campaign: HHS

Oct. 25 (UPI) — Federal health officials in a scrapped $250 million promotional campaign offered professional Santa Claus actors early access to a vaccine for COVID-19 in exchange for participating in pro-vaccine public service announcements, the Department of Health and Human Services said Sunday.

Santa Claus actors, as well as those playing Mrs. Claus and Christmas elves, were to be hired as part of a cancelled celebrity campaign to promote getting vaccinated, an HHS official told the New York Times.

The campaign was envisioned by President Donald Trump’s then-appointee Michael Caputo, a former HHS assistant secretary, who has been on medical leave since September after being diagnosed with cancer and posting conspiracy theories on his Facebook page, including a video accusing the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention of harboring a “resistance unit” seeking to undermine Trump.

The office of HHS Secretary Alex M. Azar said this week that the program had been cancelled. The Santa “collaboration will not be happening,” a spokesperson told the Wall Street Journal.

In late August, as the coronavirus pandemic peaked across parts of the United States, Caputo and the agency approached Ric Erwin, chairman of the Fraternal Order of Real Bearded Santas, to ask if members would participate in TV, radio, social media and podcast ads and live events in 35 cities.

The campaign was titled “Covid 19 Public Health and Reopening America Public Service Announcements and Advertising Campaign” designed to “defeat despair, inspire hope and achieve national recovery,” the Wall Street Journal reported.

The Santa group agreed to participate and asked to be given the vaccine early, as Santa actors had been vaccinated early in 2009 for H1N1.

The actors who play Santa are in an “at risk” category because of their “advanced age” and “underlying health issues,” Erwin wrote in a newsletter for Santa actors.

“Furthermore, health care officials all concurred that our high rate of interpersonal contact with young children (who are notorious vectors for disease dissemination) further highlighted our need for the vaccine,” he added.

Christmas seasonal workers are watching their livelihoods disappear as stores like Macy’s have cancelled in-person visits with Santa Claus, Mrs. Claus and their elves. Some tech-savvy Santas have offered a Zoom alternative or pre-recorded video messages.

Caputo told Erwin in August that the vaccine was likely to be approved in the late fall and that Santas and other seasonal workers would have it by Thanksgiving, the Wall Street Journal reported.

“If you and your colleagues are not essential workers, I don’t know what is,” Caputo said on a call, which was recorded by Erwin. “I cannot wait to tell the president,” Caputo added. “He’s going to love this.”

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Yanga SC part ways with South African fitness coach

Tanzania giants Young Africans (Yanga SC) have parted ways with fitness coach Riedoh Berdien.

Berdien joined the Jangwani giants alongside Belgian coach Luc Eymael, who was later fired at the end of the 2019-20 Mainland Premier League season after finishing without silverware.

Despite the exit of Eymael, Berdien remained at Yanga and at one time worked as the assistant coach as the team searched for a successor to replace Eymael.

The team then hired Serbian Zlatko Krmpotic, who worked with Berdien, before he was also fired after only 37 days in charge.

Berdien has exclusively told Goal he has also left the giants, who are now under another new coach – Cedric Kaze – who signed a three-year contract last Friday.

“I would like to thank Yanga supporters, players and sponsors for really making me be part of the Yanga family,” Berdien said in a signed statement obtained by Goal.

“As we come to an end of our journey, I will like to show my appreciation to all those who have supported the team in helping to build the club into the giants they are known to be.

“As we part ways I wish this great club all the best in the future.”

Yanga are currently preparing for their next league match against Polisi Tanzania set for Thursday at the Benjamin Mkapa Stadium.

The Timu ya Mwananchi are currently enjoying a good run of form in the top-flight as they have managed to win five matches from the six played so far this campaign.

However, the team will miss the services of two players – Mapinduzi Balama and Ally Makame – due to injury and malaria, respectively.

According to Yanga team manager Hafidhi Saleh, both players were in line to play a role in the fixture but have now been ruled out.

“[Balama] is working his way back to full fitness and has started light exercise to make him fit, however, the medical team is yet to confirm his fitness if he can join the first team training,” Saleh told Goal.

“On the other hand, Makame is suffering from a bout of malaria and he has been excused from the squad, we will check him out if he will be available for the next match.”

Balama has become a regular in Yanga’s team where he scored three goals last season, including the game against rivals Simba SC which gave him a chance to be nominated for the goal of the season award.

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Healthy volunteers to be infected with Covid as part of new U.K. ‘challenge trial’

LONDON — British volunteers will be intentionally infected with Covid-19 as part of an experimental trial that could change scientists’ understanding of the virus.

London is hosting the world’s first coronavirus so-called “challenge trials” in which volunteers are injected with a potential vaccine before being given a nasal-spray dose of the potentially deadly pathogen.

Ahead of the announcement by Open Orphan plc on Tuesday, there has been huge controversy within the scientific community.

Supporters say challenge trials can be far quicker than regular vaccine tests, potentially shortening the wait until the world has access to an effective inoculation.

But critics argue that too little is known about Covid-19 to make challenge trials safe. While young people rarely die of the disease, there is increasing evidence they can be left with long-term debilitating illnesses.

Sue Tansey, a pharmaceutical physician who is a member of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics, an independent British watchdog, said that there was still “disagreement among experts” whether it’s appropriate to go ahead with challenge trials. “People are divided because it’s an ethical conundrum,” she said.

There are more than 150 vaccines in development around the world, a handful of which have reached phase 3 tests, where large numbers of people — as many as tens of thousands — are given the vaccine, while others get a placebo.

In ordinary studies volunteers are sent out into the world and regularly tested for Covid-19 in the hope that there will be some noticeable difference between the vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups. However this can take a long time — many of the participants will take months to get infected if they do at all.

A challenge trial could shorten that timeline: All volunteers get the vaccine, and all of them get the virus too. Researchers say a group of just 40 volunteers would likely tell them a huge amount about any vaccine candidate in just a short space of time. Everyone accepts there are risks.

Image: The construction site is seen of the new dedicated Vaccines Manufacturing Innovation Centre (VMIC) currently under construction on the Harwell science and innovations campus near Didcot in central England (Richard Pohle / AFP - Getty Images)
Image: The construction site is seen of the new dedicated Vaccines Manufacturing Innovation Centre (VMIC) currently under construction on the Harwell science and innovations campus near Didcot in central England (Richard Pohle / AFP – Getty Images)

Sir Patrick Vallance, the U.K.’s chief scientific adviser, said in July that two things needed to happen for challenge trials to be considered safe. Scientists need to know the right dose to administer and to have discovered antiviral drugs that can “rescue” patients who become seriously ill.

Asked what the answers to these questions were, he said, “We don’t yet know.”

Although young people aged 18 to 30 — who typically volunteer for medical trials — rarely die from coronavirus, there is increasing data and anecdotal evidence of young, healthy people crushed by debilitating long-term conditions affecting the heart, brain and lungs.

“The argument against doing it is that we don’t know enough about the cases where some younger people have these long term problems afterwards,” Tansey said. “The other downside is that although we’ve

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What’s the Difference Between a Dentist and an Orthodontist? Part 2

This follows on from a previous article explaining the simple difference between dentists and orthodontists in terms of other subjects like doctors and surgeons and police officers and detectives. This article outlines the types of work that dentists and orthodontists do.

Years ago, hundreds of years ago, dentistry was a fairly unsophisticated subject. It required good physical skill, but the range of treatments available was fairly small – if your tooth was badly hurting, you saw someone to take it out. There weren’t any anaesthetics, so if you were lucky, the dentist took out the tooth quickly, and it didn’t break on the way out, and it didn’t hurt too much, and if you were very lucky he took out the correct tooth first time.

There wasn’t the option of modern fillings or root treatments, or gum treatments. There weren’t even antibiotic medicines to stop infections and abscesses. In fact, dental infections were a significant cause of death in the middle ages. Back then, a lot of dentistry, like a lot of surgery, was carried out by barbers, who had a good collection of blades and steel instruments.

Eventually dentistry moved on. More treatments were developed and some teeth could be saved. Advances in anaesthetics meant that more work could be done on teeth without upsetting the patients. After a while examinations were brought in to make sure that the people carrying out dentistry were fit to do so and this helped protect the public from poor dentists.

Over the years dentistry became even more advanced. Nowadays, a dentist would leave dental school and expect to know about:

  • Fillings
  • Crowns
  • Bridges
  • Veneers
  • Tooth whitening
  • Implants
  • Root treatments
  • Gum diseases
  • Jaw muscle problems
  • Problems involving the lining of the mouth, including the tongue, and including monitoring for mouth cancer
  • Dentures
  • Dental Surgery
  • Children’s dentistry
  • Orthodontics
  • Dental X-Rays
  • Medical problems related to dentistry
  • Dental problems related to medicine
  • Medications needed to treat dental problems

That’s a lot to stay on top of, and it also is a lot of instruments to keep in order to provide all of these treatments, so many dentists tend to concentrate on the areas that interest them most. The area I know best is orthodontics, and here are some of the areas of orthodontics that orthodontists need to think about when planning, organising, and carrying out treatment for a patient:

  • Invisible braces (like INVISALIGN))
  • Tooth coloured braces (like DAMON CLEAR)
  • Metal Fixed Braces (train tracks like DAMON Q or MX)
  • Lingual Braces (Braces on the inside of the teeth)
  • Removable braces
  • Retainer braces
  • Twin block braces
  • Headgear braces
  • Developing teeth
  • Extra teeth (supernumerary teeth)
  • Missing teeth
  • Teeth with abnormal roots
  • Teeth in an abnormal position
  • Abnormal jaw bone
  • Abnormal tooth shape
  • Abnormal jaw sizes
  • Abnormal gums
  • How the growth of the face and jaws will affect the treatment
  • How to tell if a patient’s face is still growing
  • If the patient needs surgery for the teeth
  • If the patient needs surgery for the jaws
  • If the patient
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Health Insurance Solutions Part II

Time and time again there is a solution to every problem, challenge, obstacle or anything else that may cause us to fret. Ecclesiastes 3: 1-8. The Affordable Care Act never stated insurer had to do away with the underwriting process. Several elements to sell plans were implemented to conform and to be compliant with the law which included: essential health benefits which are all necessary; with the exception of pediatric dental and vision coverage, especially for someone who does not have minor children in their custody.

The other element is the fact that carriers could no longer deny coverage to consumers who has more than enough health related conditions with exorbitant premiums, terms in the insurance world “rated” because of preexisting conditions.

This is the major problem facing the health sector and why insurers are unable to measure their risk with finding reasonable rates for the American people. This is a shot in the dark for insurance companies to play a guessing game of not knowing who has chronic health problems on a regular basis and what the cost would be to accurately provide care at reasonable prices. Actuaries’ calculate insurance with a purpose; to estimate risk. No measuring stick, no wonder why carriers have lost money over the last several years and are ready to bail out.

The government involvement in the insurance industry is to govern, not necessarily to run the insurance business. It is sad that large carriers are allowing the government to dictate and rule out the main premise of insurance. This business is built on risk factors. There is no difference if you wanted to purchase homeowners, auto; or any other type of insurance, there are risks with insuring property. Our physical bodies are a higher risk since we are moving objects on the go all the time, we wear out and break down time to time and have to be repaired and healed.

Why aren’t insurers addressing this fact with lawmakers? What are the chances of a mechanical breakdown with stationary buildings? Physical buildings breakdown due to neglect and lack of maintenance, or if someone physically damaged the property for whatever reason. When was the last time you purchased property and casualty insurance and your risk wasn’t taken into consideration for how much you will be charged in premium dollars? Well, it is no different with health insurance.

There is a solution and a plan that will work. It is not about taxes, neither is it about how many people will lose coverage, cutting back on Medicaid, squeezing the poor, the rich getting richer or the other non sense we hear from politicians. Insurers need to be bold and follow the guidelines of the current law, go back to the underwriting process, deny no one coverage and have affordable premiums based on risk the way it was in time past; prior-Affordable Care Act.

As consumers, it is our responsibility to take care of these earthly bodies and to protect our finances while we are …

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