Canadian Red Cross kickstarts recruitment campaign to build teams for its ongoing response to the COVID-19 pandemic

Recruitment campaign launches to build additional capacity, initial focus on Ottawa

OTTAWA, Oct. 29, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The Canadian Red Cross has launched a nationwide recruitment campaign seeking Canadians who want to make a difference during the COVID-19 pandemic, and beyond. The Red Cross anticipates the need for assistance to increase across sectors as the pandemic persists and communities across the country are experiencing second waves of the virus. The Red Cross continues to work in support of the federal and provincial governments, and is coordinating with local authorities, public health officials, and others as needed to address emerging needs.

QUICK FACTS
The Canadian Red Cross is hiring for a variety of roles as it continues to build care teams to work in many areas across the country. The immediate focus is to build teams to support in long-term care (LTC) homes in Ontario where personnel will work alongside existing staff in the homes to provide assistance to seniors. Red Cross personnel is currently providing essential personal care services and assisting with daily living activities of seniors residing in LTC.

In building effective and strong care teams, Red Cross will:

  • Seek to recruit and train people to join already existing Red Cross personnel in supporting the care of seniors in LTC;

  • Train newly recruited and existing personnel on preventing disease transmission, including the proper use of personal protective equipment; and,

  • Provide emergency equipment supplies, including mobile health clinics, to help augment public health efforts.

QUOTE
“With many communities across the country experiencing a second wave of the pandemic, the Red Cross is well positioned to provide assistance in long-term care homes and beyond. The Red Cross has been supporting efforts across the country since the initial onset of COVID-19. Our recent work of providing comfort and care to seniors in long-term care facilities in Quebec, along with training to prevent disease transmission, will be foundational to this role in Ontario. The Red Cross is ready to further-build its capacity across the country and provide this vital assistance as needs emerge. We encourage Canadians who wish to make a difference to apply.”
Conrad Sauvé, president and CEO, Canadian Red Cross

The Canadian Red Cross has played a significant role in Canada’s response to the global pandemic and has been there from the beginning when it provided support to returning travellers under quarantine in Trenton and Cornwall. The Canadian Red Cross is well-positioned to provide assistance in LTC with expertise led by its Global Health Unit, a team of medical experts who have experience responding to emergencies around the world. In addition, the Red Cross continues to support LTC homes in Quebec where teams have been organizing and delivering personal protective equipment and prevention of disease transmission training, offering technical advice on epidemic prevention and control, as well as providing components of its field hospital to use.

More information on available job opportunities can be found on redcross.ca.

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Hospitalised COVID-19 Patients Can Have Ongoing Symptoms for Months -Study | Top News

LONDON (Reuters) – More than half of COVID-19 patients discharged from hospital still experienced symptoms of breathlessness, fatigue, anxiety and depression for two to three months after their initial infection, according to the findings of a small UK study.

The research, led by scientists at Britain’s Oxford University, looked at the long-term impact of COVID-19 in 58 patients hospitalised with the pandemic disease.

It found that some patients have abnormalities in multiple organs after being infected with the novel coronavirus and that persistent inflammation caused problems for some for months.

The study has not been peer-reviewed by other scientists but was published before review on the MedRxiv website.

“These findings underscore the need to further explore the physiological processes associated with COVID-19 and to develop a holistic, integrated model of clinical care for our patients after they have been discharged from hospital,” said Betty Raman, a doctor at Oxford’s Radcliffe Department of Medicine who co-led the research.

An initial report by Britain’s National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) published last week showed that ongoing illness after infection with COVID-19, sometimes called “long COVID”, can involve a wide range of symptoms affecting all parts of the body and mind.

The Oxford study’s results showed that two to three months after the onset of the COVID-19, 64% of patients suffered persistent breathlessness and 55% reported significant fatigue.

MRI scans showed abnormalities in the lungs of 60% of the COVID-19 patients, in the kidneys of 29%, in the hearts of 26% and the livers of 10%.

“The abnormalities detected … strongly correlated with serum markers of inflammation,” Raman said. “This suggests a potential link between chronic inflammation and ongoing organ damage among survivors.”

(Reporting by Kate Kelland in London. Additional reporting by Ann Maria Shibu in Bengaluru; Editing by Alison Williams and Steve Orlofsky)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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Hospitalised COVID-19 patients can have ongoing symptoms for months: study

LONDON (Reuters) – More than half of COVID-19 patients discharged from hospital still experienced symptoms of breathlessness, fatigue, anxiety and depression for two to three months after their initial infection, according to the findings of a small UK study.

The research, led by scientists at Britain’s Oxford University, looked at the long-term impact of COVID-19 in 58 patients hospitalised with the pandemic disease.

It found that some patients have abnormalities in multiple organs after being infected with the novel coronavirus and that persistent inflammation caused problems for some for months.

The study has not been peer-reviewed by other scientists but was published before review on the MedRxiv website.

“These findings underscore the need to further explore the physiological processes associated with COVID-19 and to develop a holistic, integrated model of clinical care for our patients after they have been discharged from hospital,” said Betty Raman, a doctor at Oxford’s Radcliffe Department of Medicine who co-led the research.

An initial report by Britain’s National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) published last week showed that ongoing illness after infection with COVID-19, sometimes called “long COVID”, can involve a wide range of symptoms affecting all parts of the body and mind.

The Oxford study’s results showed that two to three months after the onset of the COVID-19, 64% of patients suffered persistent breathlessness and 55% reported significant fatigue.

MRI scans showed abnormalities in the lungs of 60% of the COVID-19 patients, in the kidneys of 29%, in the hearts of 26% and the livers of 10%.

“The abnormalities detected … strongly correlated with serum markers of inflammation,” Raman said. “This suggests a potential link between chronic inflammation and ongoing organ damage among survivors.”

(Reporting by Kate Kelland in London. Additional reporting by Ann Maria Shibu in Bengaluru; Editing by Alison Williams and Steve Orlofsky)

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