Central Ohio nonprofit’s ‘Farmacy in the City’ program in South Linden to combine diet, medicine

Editor’s note: This story has been updated to correct the number of patients served by the Charitable Pharmacy and which government agency gave it $1.5 million to renovate the building where it is opening a second location.



a sign on the side of the road: Site of the former Eagle Supermarket, 1464 Cleveland Ave., on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020 in Columbus, Ohio. The Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio and Community Development for All People will open a pharmacy and fresh-food market at the site of the former South Linden carryout, which the city shut down in 2016. The "Farmacy in the City" will open in Spring 2021.


© Joshua A. Bickel/Columbus Dispatch
Site of the former Eagle Supermarket, 1464 Cleveland Ave., on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020 in Columbus, Ohio. The Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio and Community Development for All People will open a pharmacy and fresh-food market at the site of the former South Linden carryout, which the city shut down in 2016. The “Farmacy in the City” will open in Spring 2021.

The Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio will open a second location addressing low-income Franklin County residents’ food and pharmaceutical needs with its “Farmacy in the City” program. 

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The nonprofit’s new site, co-located with Community Development for All People, will feature a pharmacy and fresh food market under one roof. Here, vulnerable Franklin County residents can receive non-narcotic prescription medicine, pharmacy services and healthy food at no cost. 

“Our patients may not have access to healthy food and other resources that you need to stay in those healthy habits to reduce your disease burden,” Charitable Pharmacy executive director Jennifer Seifert said. “We’re really excited now that when someone says, ‘I don’t know what to eat,’ we can bring some resources around them.”

Since 2010, CPCO has contributed $50 million in pharmacy services and prescription medicine, today serving over 7,000 Franklin County residents living at or below 200% of the federal poverty level.

More: Charitable Pharmacy sees more patients, more costs due to COVID-19

CPCO’s model is different from that of free clinics. Pharmacists spend time with patients to understand their medical history, explain the impact of their prescribed medicine and create an action plan for the future, development director Melanie Boyd said.

Despite this decade of positive impact, it’s clear that sometimes medicine isn’t the most pressing need when patients walk through the pharmacy’s doors. Basic needs such as food, shelter and clothing often take precedence. 

After receiving a grant of nearly $100,000 from the Franklin County Board of Commissioners in 2019, CPCO began exploring communities where its support could have the most impact and identified South Linden as a place where it could help the neighborhood achieve better health outcomes.



A rendering of the completed renovations for the Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio's fresh market. Slated to open spring 2021, the "farmacy" will be located at 1464 Cleveland Ave. in South Linden in a former Eagle Market.


© Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio
A rendering of the completed renovations for the Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio’s fresh market. Slated to open spring 2021, the “farmacy” will be located at 1464 Cleveland Ave. in South Linden in a former Eagle Market.

The unfortunate truth is that one’s ZIP code often determines the quality of their health care.

“You go to the suburbs and look at how many pharmacies you have per capita — it’s a real different story in some other sections of the city,” Boyd said. “We know that coming in (to South Linden) as a charitable pharmacy to work with the existing pharmacies, we’re going to be able to meet

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‘This Is A Precarious Time’ In Ohio, Governor Says

COLUMBUS, OH — Gov. Mike DeWine warned Ohioans that the state is in a “precarious” position in its battle with the coronavirus.

The governor spoke with media on Monday and addressed the state’s widespread surge of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations. He said he was alarmed at how rapidly the virus has spread among Ohioans over the past two weeks.

DeWine emphasized that the virus is spreading at social gatherings, as more people get together and ignore social distancing and masking rules. The governor said Ohioans are responsible for curbing the spread of the virus — and that means wearing masks.

“We’ve learned the value of a mask. These masks, when two people are wearing them, there’s a great ability to cut the spread down,” DeWine said.

Don’t miss the latest updates from health and government officials in Ohio on the coronavirus. Sign up for Patch newsletters and news alerts.

The governor said Ohioans living in rural areas are increasingly refusing to wear masks when they’re in public. He urged Ohioans to don masks whenever they’re around someone who isn’t part of their bubble.

“This is a more precarious time,” DeWine said. He emphasized that as colder weather forces Ohioans indoors, there’s a greater opportunity for the virus to spread.

“I understand people are sick of masks. I understand people are sick of distancing. I know they’re sick of everything. But we can see the end of this thing,” DeWine said.

State officials have developed a plan to distribute any forthcoming COVID-19 vaccine. DeWine said officials will continue to tweak that plan, even though there is no timeline on when a vaccine may be available.

Health officials confirmed 1,837 in the past 24 hours, the Ohio Department of Health reported. Since the start of the pandemic, Ohio has seen more than 183,000 COVID-19 cases.

Here are all of Monday’s COVID-19 numbers in Ohio:

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This article originally appeared on the Across Ohio Patch

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Ohio reports 1,562 new coronavirus cases, no new deaths: Sunday update

CLEVELAND, Ohio – The Ohio Department of Health reported Sunday that while no new COVID-19 deaths have been reported statewide, the number of confirmed or probable infections of the novel coronavirus had risen to 181,787, up 1,562 since Saturday.

On Saturday, Ohio reported its highest number of coronavirus cases in a 24-hour span, tallying 2,234 new cases. In total, the department reported 5,067 deaths and 180,225 infections.

Ohio’s coronavirus figures tend to lag on weekends due to reporting delays.

Sunday’s new case count is slightly higher than the 21-day rolling average, which currently sits at 1,475 cases. The state has seen a spike in cases over the past week, inching the rolling average higher.

There are nearly 40 million confirmed cases of coronavirus and more than 1.1 million deaths worldwide, according to Johns Hopkins researchers. In the U.S., there are more than 8.1 million confirmed cases of coronavirus and nearly 220,000 COVID-19 deaths.

More Ohio coronavirus news:

Delta Air Lines suspends flights to Akron-Canton Airport amid coronavirus pandemic

Read Ohio’s latest amended senior center and adult day center public health order lifting mandatory coronavirus testing

Cuyahoga County Board of Health reports 463 more suburban cases of coronavirus in the past week

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Cincinnati, Ohio Cosmetic Dentist Uses Neuromuscular Dentistry To Treat TMJ

People don't often think to consult their dentist for treatment of migraines and other chronic headaches, neck aches and facial pain, but they should.

These debilitating symptoms often are the result of temporomandibular joint disorder- commonly referred to as TMJ-a jaw alignment and bite disorder that can be treated through neuromuscular dentistry.

The TMJ is the ball-and-socket joint on each side of the head where the lower jawbone joins the temporal bone of the skull, according to mayoclinic.com/health/tmj-disorders/DS00355
The lower jaw has rounded ends that glide in and out of the joint socket when talking, chewing or yawning.

Between five percent and 15 percent of people in the United States experience pain associated with TMJ disorders, according to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), part of the National Institutes of Health. Women are more likely than men to develop TMJ disorders.

In most cases, pain and discomfort associated with TMJ disorders can be treated through self-managed care or non-surgical treatments, said Dr. Mindy Munowitz, a dentist who specializes in neuromuscular and cosmetic dentistry in Cincinnati, Ohio. However, more severe cases may require further dental or surgical treatment.

While traditional dentistry evaluates primarily the teeth, bones and gums, neuromuscular dentistry works with the hard tissues and the soft tissues, muscles and nerves, according to leadingdentists.com/what_is_neuromuscular/what_is_neuromuscular_dent.html the Las Vegas Institute for Advanced Dental Studies Web site.

Typically, the treatment follows three steps. The first is to relieve the pain of muscle spasms and the overall discomfort of TMJ symptoms.

"Patients suffering from TMJ are looking for relief of the symptoms," Munowitz said. "We are successful in doing this through non-surgical neuromuscular dentistry methods."

The best way to do this is by using technology called Ultra Low Frequency Transcutaneous Electrical Neural Stimulation, or ULF-TENS. Simply put, this stimulation emits pulses to gently massage the jaw muscles and relax them. ULF-TENS relieves the pain by stimulating the body's production of endorphins, the body's natural anesthetic.

The next step is to stabilize the patient's bite. This is accomplished using an orthotic, which is worn over the teeth.

"The orthotic allows me to make easy adjustments to the plastic without adjusting the teeth until the bite is stabilized," Munowitz said.

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