Rhode Island Among States With Highest Childhood Obesity Rates

Rhode Island is among U.S. states with the highest rates of childhood obesity, according to a new study released Wednesday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

According to this year’s State of Childhood Obesity report, about 1 in 7 children nationwide are considered obese — or about 15.5 percent.

At 11th in the nation, our state falls higher than the U.S. average. This year’s report says roughly 17.5 percent of YOUR STATE children ages 10 to 17 are considered obese.

“Childhood obesity remains an epidemic in this country,” Jamie Bussel, senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, said in a release. “We must confront these current crises in ways that also support long-term health and equity for all children and families in the United States.”

The focus of this year’s report, according to a release by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is prioritizing childhood health amid the coronavirus pandemic.

In the study, researchers say the pandemic and ongoing economic recession have worsened many of the broader factors that contribute to obesity, including poverty and health disparities.

Emerging research links obesity with increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, including among children. Evidence from other vaccines also has led some experts to predict that a COVID-19 vaccine may be less effective in those with underlying medical conditions such as obesity.

The pandemic also exacerbates conditions that put children at risk for obesity.

School closures have left millions of children without a regular source of healthy meals or physical activity. In addition, millions of caregivers have lost income or jobs, making it more difficult for families to access or afford healthy foods.

To determine the most recent childhood obesity rates, the foundation used data from the 2018-19 National Survey of Children’s Health, along with information collected through a separate analysis conducted by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

The report also highlights the obesity rates in younger children, high school students and adults. Here’s a look at how Rhode Island rates:

  • Children ages 2 to 4 (participating in WIC — the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program): 15.4 percent, or 11 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Children aged 10 to 17: 17.5 percent, or 11 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • High school students: 14.3 percent, or 28 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults: 30 percent, or 35 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults with diabetes: 10.4 percent, or 30 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults with hypertension: 33 percent, or 30 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

Here are a couple findings of note from this year’s report:

Childhood obesity is more prevalent in children of color: About 11.7 percent of white children are considered obese. Rates are significantly higher for Hispanic (20.7 percent), Black (22.9 percent), American Indian/Alaska Native (28.5 percent), and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander (39.8 percent) children.

Income also affects the prevalence of obesity: About 21.5 percent of youths

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Colorado Among States With Lowest Childhood Obesity Rates

Colorado is among U.S. states with the lowest rates of childhood obesity, says a new study released Wednesday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

According to this year’s State of Childhood Obesity report, about 1 in 7 children nationwide are considered obese — or about 15.5 percent.

At No. 45 in the nation, our state falls lower than the U.S. average. This year’s report says roughly 10.9 percent of Colorado children ages 10 to 17 are considered obese.

“Childhood obesity remains an epidemic in this country,” Jamie Bussel, senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, said in a release. “We must confront these current crises in ways that also support long-term health and equity for all children and families in the United States.”

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The focus of this year’s report, according to a release by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is prioritizing childhood health amid the coronavirus pandemic.

In the study, researchers say the pandemic and ongoing economic recession have worsened many of the broader factors that contribute to obesity, including poverty and health disparities.

Emerging research links obesity with increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, including among children. Evidence from other vaccines also has led some experts to predict that a COVID-19 vaccine may be less effective in those with underlying medical conditions such as obesity.

The pandemic also exacerbates conditions that put children at risk for obesity.

School closures have left millions of children without a regular source of healthy meals or physical activity. In addition, millions of caregivers have lost income or jobs, making it more difficult for families to access or afford healthy foods.

To determine the most recent childhood obesity rates, the foundation used data from the 2018-19 National Survey of Children’s Health, along with information collected through a separate analysis conducted by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

The report also highlights the obesity rates in younger children, high school students and adults. Here’s a look at how Colorado rates:

  • Children ages 2 to 4 (participating in WIC — the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program): 8.1 percent, or 50 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • High school students: 10.3 percent, or 43 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults: 23.8 percent, or 49 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults with diabetes: 7 percent, or 50 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults with hypertension: 25.8 percent, or 50 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

Here are a couple findings of note from this year’s report:

  • Childhood obesity is more prevalent in children of color: About 11.7 percent of white children are considered obese. Rates are significantly higher for Hispanic (20.7 percent), Black (22.9 percent), American Indian/Alaska Native (28.5 percent), and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander (39.8 percent) children.

  • Income also

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Arizona Among States With Lowest Childhood Obesity Rates

ARIZONA — Arizona is among U.S. states with the lowest rates of childhood obesity, says a new study released Wednesday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

According to this year’s State of Childhood Obesity report, about 1 in 7 children nationwide are considered obese — or about 15.5 percent.

At 38th in the nation, our state falls lower than the U.S. average. This year’s report says roughly 12.1 percent of Arizona children ages 10 to 17 are considered obese.

“Childhood obesity remains an epidemic in this country,” Jamie Bussel, senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, said in a release. “We must confront these current crises in ways that also support long-term health and equity for all children and families in the United States.”

The focus of this year’s report, according to a release by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is prioritizing childhood health amid the coronavirus pandemic.

In the study, researchers say the pandemic and ongoing economic recession have worsened many of the broader factors that contribute to obesity, including poverty and health disparities.

Emerging research links obesity with increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, including among children. Evidence from other vaccines also has led some experts to predict that a COVID-19 vaccine may be less effective in those with underlying medical conditions such as obesity.

The pandemic also exacerbates conditions that put children at risk for obesity.

School closures have left millions of children without a regular source of healthy meals or physical activity. In addition, millions of caregivers have lost income or jobs, making it more difficult for families to access or afford healthy foods.

To determine the most recent childhood obesity rates, the foundation used data from the 2018-19 National Survey of Children’s Health, along with information collected through a separate analysis conducted by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

The report also highlights the obesity rates in younger children, high school students and adults. Here’s a look at how Arizona rates:

  • Children ages 2 to 4 (participating in WIC — the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program): 12.1 percent, or 41 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • High school students: 13.3 percent, or 35 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults: 31.4 percent, or 31 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults with diabetes: 10.9 percent, or 21 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults with hypertension: 32.5 percent, or 21 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

Here are a couple findings of note from this year’s report:

  • Childhood obesity is more prevalent in children of color: About 11.7 percent of white children are considered obese. Rates are significantly higher for Hispanic (20.7 percent), Black (22.9 percent), American Indian/Alaska Native (28.5 percent), and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander (39.8 percent) children.

  • Income also affects the prevalence of obesity: About 21.5 percent of youths in households making less than the federal poverty level were considered obese, more than double the 8.8 percent

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Obesity And Overweight: Five Diseases And Health Conditions

A health care professional can readily tell if you are obese, overweight, or healthy by simply measuring your Body Mass Index, or BMI, in short. It effectively determines your weight in proportion to your height and the further it goes outside the scope of the standard range, the greater your odds are of developing a host of critical health issues from obesity and overweight.

Accomplishing and sustaining a healthy weight is something that cannot be achieved overnight and might turn out to be a challenging task for obese and overweight individuals in the long-term. Ensuring a healthy weight through appropriate means or at least preventing yourself from gaining more weight can help overweight people reduce the likelihood of developing specific medical conditions.

Obesity is on the verge of becoming a national epidemic in the USA and is associated with several chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, hyperlipidemia, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. The grave medical condition is responsible for an astounding 18% mortality rate in the age group of 40 to 85 among American population, as observed by a health research study carried out in 2013, questioning the deeply-rooted, prevailing notion of the medical and scientific community that a mere 5 in every 100 deaths in the country are related to obesity. The new finding essentially suggests that it is as fatal as cigarette smoking, when it comes to the discussion of public health hazards, as the particular way of nicotine consumption can be linked to 20 in every 100 deaths in the USA and is acknowledged as the major preventable cause of mortality in the country.

Almost 2 in every 5 American adults were diagnosed with obesity in 2015-16, which is a significant increase from 34% in 2007-08, and its impact became more profound with a steep increase from 5.7% to 7.7% during that time. While not a single state reported an obesity rate of over 15% in 1985, as many as 5 of them registered rates higher than 35% for the year 2016.

Obesity and overweight are often associated with emotional health issues like depression. People who are either obese or overweight may also experience weight bias as well as face the stigma of the medical care services providers and others, which, in turn, can result in guilt, feeling of rejection, or shame, further worsening the prevailing problems concerning one’s mental well-being.

The major diseases and health complications caused by obesity and overweight are illustrated below in brief.

I. TYPE 2 DIABETES

When the blood glucose concentration becomes abnormally high on a permanent basis, the particular medical condition is termed as type 2 diabetes. About 4 in every 5 individuals with the said form of diabetes are known to be either obese or overweight. High blood sugar levels can manifest a large number of medical conditions, such as stroke, heart conditions, eye issues, neuropathic damage, eye problems, and other health issues.

Allowing yourself to engage in periodic physical activities and reducing 5% to 7% of your …

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Treating Obesity With Orthomolecular Medicine

Treating and healing obesity and weight problems with ordinary amino acids is the basis for Orthomolecular Medicine. Large doses of naturally found proteins called amino acids can repair the imbalance in the brain and repair its malfunction. These amino acids are affordable and are used in therapeutic doses much larger than those levels normally found in food. The concept of orthomolecular medicine is based upon the use of very large doses of vitamins, minerals, amino acids, or botanical extracts for the cellular repair and enhancement of normal brain activities. Amino acids are also key to supporting increase muscle mass needed to keep the metabolism higher as weight loss occurs. Weight loss without increasing muscle mass and exercising will result in decreased metabolic rates and the body will adapt to low daily calorie requirements as weight loss is achieved without intervention.

Many times there is a problem wit the body preventing it from losing weight easily. These problems include thyroid disease, hormone imbalances, diabetes, impaired cardiac function, neurotransmitter imbalances, chronic viral infections that result in low energy and fatigue, chromosome problems in developmentally challenged people, fatty liver disease, impaired spleen function, and digestive tracts which are significantly longer than normal, problems digesting fat. A fatty liver is a very big problem in weight loss. This may be partially due to a high fat diet and high levels of heavy metal or pesticide toxins. Detoxification of toxins is a great idea along with herbs to support good liver function. Heavy metals or pesticides toxins need to be removed with far infrared sauna or hot yoga and oral chelators like cilantro, organic wheat grass, or chorella. Milk thistle is a very good herb for liver support. Fat cells store toxins and a fatty liver has additional stores of toxins which impair cellular metabolism and the normal release of fat for energy. Additional herbs that are very good for improved liver function are Gynostemma Pentaphyllum and Hawthorn Berries. These can be taken in capsule form or as a tea. Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids and CLA are very good to reduce liver fat that is not due to alcoholism.

Amino acid therapy is very good for weight loss and there are it works. These weight loss effects include decreasing appetite, altering glucose regulation, tweaking the metabolism of energy by the cell, and speeding the release of fat during energy production. 5-HTP, carnitine, orthinine, phenylalanine, theanine, and arginine are amino acids which are effective in weight loss. These amino acids should be used in therapeutic doses for several months. You should be able to discern within seven to twelve days if the therapy is successful.

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