How to keep motivated with your fitness goals in the new normal


How to keep motivated with your fitness goals in the new normal

MANILA, Philippines — For active people who regularly work out in the gym or who frequently exercise in the outdoors, being quarantined at home for months not only affected their routines but also their mindsets.

If this happened to you, don’t feel guilty as it’s totally normal. The mind had different ways of coping with the challenges and changes brought about by the pandemic.

But it’s also about time to get back on track with your fitness goals, especially as quarantine measures are being eased. Some physical activities like running and biking are already allowed outdoors as long as safety protocols are observed. While gyms are yet to reopen, home workouts are always accessible and free for all.

Here are simple tips to keep you motivated.

1. Remember what got you started

Were you trying to lose weight, or were you building body mass? Were you training for an upcoming marathon, or were you learning a new workout?

No matter your reason, remind yourself of the goal that got you to the road of fitness. This way, you will also remember your previous mileage and accomplishments, and then be encouraged to accomplish more and ultimately, achieve your fitness goal.

2. Find your support team

While everyone must remain physically and socially distant with one another, this gap could be bridged with digital connectivity. Support could be expressed over the internet.

Knowing this, rally your fitness friends and invite them to join online workout classes together. By working out together, albeit in your own homes, you already support each other.

If exercising outside, you can find a running buddy so it wouldn’t feel so lonely. Cheer up one another as you complete your kilometers.

 

Some physical activities like running and biking are already allowed outdoors as long as safety protocols are observed.

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3. Try new activities

Who says you cannot experience new things during this pandemic?

Today, more and more Filipinos have already tried cycling not only to commute and go to places, but also to stay fit and active. You can give this a try and feel how easily biking could burn those calories. If you’re a first timer, best to also have a group whom you can ride together and watch over each other for road safety.

Apart from this, various gyms have set up online classes. You can check out The Movement Studio, which aims you to practice sustainable fitness that’ll boost your cardio, sculpt your body, and do it all in a very fun and invigorating way; or Plana Forma, a technique that combines pilates, yoga and dance and uses your own body weight as resistance for an invigorating and fun experience.

Another recently launched app, Rebel, offers free fitness classes from yoga to HIIT. With just your mobile phone, you can experience high-intensity workouts or a relaxing stretch for the first time, without being too conscious of not being able to follow

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A Health Care Worker’s New Normal : The Picture Show : NPR

The daughter of health care worker in the New York City area portrays her family during the pandemic. Her photography gives witness to her mother’s determination to live fully in a new normal. — Laura Beltrán Villamizar, NPR photo editor

Raymonde Elian no longer does her hair and makeup before work. No more earrings. But she still aims to look “neat and clean” as it helps her feel in good spirit.

Melissa Bunni Elian


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Melissa Bunni Elian

Raymonde Elian no longer does her hair and makeup before work. No more earrings. But she still aims to look “neat and clean” as it helps her feel in good spirit.

Melissa Bunni Elian

My mother works as an emergency room technician at NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital in Bronxville, N.Y. This year, while I sought ways to work online and my father telecommuted, my mother has been risking her life to take care of others.

My mom is one of the health care workers you meet in the triage ward. Maybe she drew your blood or monitored your heart. If you succumb to the coronavirus, she’d be one of the staffers transporting your body to the overflowing morgue.

I wasn’t able to photograph her at the hospital. So like other photojournalists confined to their homes, I turned the camera to my own life and family. I focused on what I’ve always seen: my mother’s rituals and the subtle changes around our home.

In the spring, before wearing masks was common, my mother wouldn’t leave the house without one. She’d return from a 12-hour shift with trenches dug into her face by the N95 she had to reuse for a week at a time.

Many Americans have now returned to a semblance of life, but frontline families like ours continue to bear the greatest risk in this pandemic.

Health care workers were forced to come up with ways to preserve N95 masks. Raymonde Elian wore three masks so that the N95 was less exposed.

Melissa Bunni Elian


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Melissa Bunni Elian

Health care workers were forced to come up with ways to preserve N95 masks. Raymonde Elian wore three masks so that the N95 was less exposed.

Melissa Bunni Elian

When my mother left Haiti in 1979, she left behind my infant older sister and my father, who worked as an accountant at an elementary school. In the U.S., my mother initially assembled hand saws in a steel tool factory while attending school, then as a cashier at a department store.

By the time I was born in 1987, she and my father were both working in corporate America. My mom was working at an investment firm, but she had other career interests, so she began taking courses at Iona College. A philosophy course on death and dying inspired her to leave the corporate world.

At age 38, she began working in child care and then as a nurse’s aid, all while caring for our family and taking

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Country may not be back to normal until 2022, Fauci says

As Covid-19 cases continue to jump during the fall surge, Dr. Anthony Fauci says there’s little chance of normalcy on the horizon.



background pattern: Reading, PA - October 13: A nurse puts a swab into a vial after administering a test. At the state run free COVID-19 testing site setup on Front Street in Reading, PA outside FirstEnergy Stadium Tuesday morning October 13, 2020. The site will be there for 5 days and was setup in response to an increase in cases in Berks County. (Photo by Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images)


© Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle/Getty Images
Reading, PA – October 13: A nurse puts a swab into a vial after administering a test. At the state run free COVID-19 testing site setup on Front Street in Reading, PA outside FirstEnergy Stadium Tuesday morning October 13, 2020. The site will be there for 5 days and was setup in response to an increase in cases in Berks County. (Photo by Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images)

The US will have a vaccine in the next few months, but there’s a chance a “substantial proportion of the people” won’t be vaccinated until the second or third quarter of 2021, Fauci said.

The director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases reiterated caution on the nation’s outlook.

“I think it will be easily by the end of 2021, and perhaps even into the next year, before we start having some semblances of normality,” Fauci said during a University of Melbourne panel discussion Tuesday.

Things aren’t looking too good for the US as the winter approaches, he said Wednesday.

Twenty-nine states set new records this month for the most new daily cases since the pandemic began, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

“We’re not in a good place,” Fauci during a virtual Q&A session on Wednesday. “Now we’re averaging about 70,000 a (day). That’s a bad position to be in.”

And it’s not just due to more testing. The average number of daily new cases this past week is up 21% compared to the previous week, according to JHU. But testing has increased only 6.63% over the same time frame, according to the Covid Tracking Project.

“We’re rising quickly. If we just go back about six, seven weeks ago to Labor Day, we were at about 35,000 cases a day,” said Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of Brown University School of Public Health.

“I would not be surprised if we end up getting to 100,000” new cases a day, Jha said.

At least 73,240 new US cases and 985 deaths were reported Tuesday, according to JHU.

The surge is hitting all regions of the country. As of Wednesday, 40 states were trending in the wrong direction, with at least 10% more new cases this past week compared to the previous week, according to JHU.

Missouri is the only state with at least 10% fewer cases, and the remaining nine states are relatively steady.

Track the virus in your state and nationwide

And with more cases come more hospitalizations and deaths.

Without changes, ‘half a million people will be dead’

This month, 11 states reported their highest single day of new deaths since the pandemic began.

And because a vaccine probably won’t be available to most Americans until the middle of next year, personal responsibility will be key to saving American lives.

“If we continue our current behavior, by

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Bengaluru leads the way in fitness journey in ‘new normal’- The New Indian Express

Express News Service

BENGALURU: Garden city, pub city, and now fitness capital… Bengaluru, according to a recent survey, leads the way when it comes to fitness and health consciousness.

A survey by Gympik to assess the impact of Covid-19 on India’s fitness behaviour, shows that the city tops the list in the virtual fitness landscape, with 58 per cent Bengalureans surveyed working out at least 3-4 times a week. Mumbai, with 46 per cent, Delhi/NCR, with 42 pre cent, take the second and third spot, respectively. 

Illustration: Tapas Ranjan

With more than 50,000 respondents from across geographies, the report tracks key wellness trends such as mental health, emerging fitness solutions, and new industry challenges.

The city’s vast population of IT professionals, who work long hours and are prone to health issues, have realised that they need to up their fitness quotient to sustain their line of work.

“Because they have travelled to the West a lot on work-related projects, their exposure to Western themes like CrossFit, long-distance running and yoga – which people are lapping up because of the way the it has propagated there – have influenced them to become fitness conscious,” says Abinav Shankar Narayan, founder, Namma CrossFit, adding that only those who liked lifting weights are eager to return to gyms as training at home does not allow people to lift and drop heavy weights.

Agrees nutrition advisor Shalini Manglani who feels that people in the “tech city” are more savvy with the virtual medium.

According to fitness consultant and personal trainer Bhaskar Prabhu, Bengaluru has fitness enthusiasts who are serious about their workouts.

“Many clients have set up a small gym in their houses so as to not skip their usual routine. This way they don’t have to worry about the safety issues involved in going to a gym,” says Prabhu.

With many living with senior family members, and not wanting to take a risk, Prabhu is not surprised that they have easily adapted to the virtual route.

“This way they feel they are keeping fit and building immunity without stepping out,” he says. 

Bengaluru is a hub for fitness seekers and experts, says Amaresh Ojha, founder-CEO, Gympik.

“Even before Covid-19, Bengaluru had the highest traction for online gym membership sales via our platform, which clearly shows Bengalureans’ inclination towards fitness and wellness,” he adds, pointing out that the average resident in the city is more than enthusiastic about trying out new things, especially when it involves technology.

“It’s this attitude which has made Bangalore top the charts in adopting virtual fitness services as well,” he says.

In a nutshell

  • Bengaluru leads in the virtual fitness landscape with 58%, followed by Mumbai with 46%, Delhi/NCR with 42% surveyed residents working out at least 3-4 times a week. 

  • While deciding to return to the gym, 90% of the members are strongly concerned about the sanitisation measures taken at the fitness centre.

  • 72% of members said they would feel more comfortable at the gym with additional sanitiser dispensers

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Will masks become the ‘new normal’ even after the pandemic has passed? Some Americans say so

  • Some countries, particularly in Asia, shifted their cultures after a pandemic to embrace mask-wearing in public places.
  • Some Americans say they’ve been forever changed by the pandemic, particularly when it comes to hygiene practices like hand-washing and masks.
  • For those with auto-immune diseases, that would be a positive shift.



a person standing in front of a building: People wear face masks in Times Square as the city continues the re-opening efforts following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on October 22, 2020 in New York City.


© Provided by CNBC
People wear face masks in Times Square as the city continues the re-opening efforts following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on October 22, 2020 in New York City.

Mandy Elmore, 47, has been wearing masks for more than 20 years. That’s because she has cystic fibrosis, a hereditary disease that affects her lungs and digestive system.

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Because of her illness, a cold or flu can land her in the hospital. Prior to the pandemic, Elmore, who lives in Dallas, Texas, had to stop going to church or traveling on planes to avoid strangers coughing and sneezing directly on her.

“Masks offer freedom for those of us who are sick,” she said. “I would feel comfortable going to church in the winter or to movies or to birthday parties if people could think about those like me who truly suffer as a result of a simple cold virus.”

For millions of Americans like Elmore, it would change their lives for the better if it became more of a cultural norm in the U.S. for people to wear masks when they’re under the weather or in crowded areas. The West has stigmatized mask-wearing, but in countries like Japan or South Korea, residents might get dirty looks if they hop on a subway with a sniffle and no mask.

Still, there’s reason for skepticism. Not everyone in America is wearing masks, even now, when public health officials are strongly encouraging them to do so. Rallies to protest masks have popped up across the country, with many Americans pointing out that it’s a violation of their personal freedoms.

But for others, who potentially represent a less vocal majority, it could become the new normal. Since the start of the pandemic, many people bought a handful of masks for the first time and have gotten used to wearing them in public. Doctors and public health experts believe that American culture could fundamentally shift to embrace new hygiene practices.

“I think we do need a new culture of masks, at least any time not feeling well, and I think masks are in and handshakes out for the indefinite future,” said Dr. Tom Frieden, the former director of the C.D.C. during the Obama Administration and the president of global health initiative Resolve to Save Lives.

“Post pandemic, there will be new social norms,” added Dr. Panagis Galiatsatos, a pulmonary and critical care doctor, who treats patients with chronic respiratory conditions like COPD and cystic fibrosis, as well as Covid-19.

“I think face masks will continue to be used by the general public in times when they don’t feel well, and honestly we’re realizing that no one feels slighted without

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When Will Football Stadiums Look Normal Again?

It has been a roller-coaster year for sports, and we’re nowhere near done. In recent weeks, the advent of rapid testing for COVID-19 appears to have led several college conferences, the Big Ten and Pac-12 among them, to reverse earlier decisions and declare that they’ll play a fall football season after all. Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott went so far as to call the conference’s agreement with Quidel to provide daily rapid-results testing “a game-changer” that will give student-athletes “the opportunity to pursue their dreams.”

We’ll be watching the coming weeks to see how that plays outbut the truth is, it’s probably not the biggest challenge facing the sports industry. No, the biggest challenge is this: How, and how soon, can conferences and leagues get fans back in the stands?

The abrupt restart of the college season has brought that question to the fore, as have plans by the National Football League (NFL) to play a full schedule. After eight months of watching on our screens and amid clear COVID-19 fatigue, the idea of a contest played in front of a packed house of electric-energy fans is beyond enticing. It’s the feeling of being part of something bigger, something communal, that appeals to so many sports fans.

But considering how many teams themselves are having trouble staying COVID-free, is the idea of fans in the stands even remotely worth considering? We’ll get to what we know about that (and what we don’t) in a moment. For now, staying true to sports, let’s look at the statistics.

In the NFL, money driven by in-stadium attendance is estimated to account for about 30 percent of league-wide revenue—somewhere in the area of $4 billion to $5 billion annually. So, as you might expect, the NFL is aggressively trying to figure out how soon it can fill the stands. It has left that decision to the individual teams. Of the league’s 32 franchises, 17 have plans to permit fans or are already doing so, but their approaches vary wildly, with the Dallas Cowboys permitting close to 25,000 fans per game, while the Pittsburgh Steelers and Philadelphia Eagles have been allowing about 5,500 in recent weeks. Following tumultuous recent weeks, with games being postponed and rescheduled, fan attendance will continue to be a hot topic.

In college football, the numbers change by the day. Already some 30 teams have plans to bring back 10,000 or more fans to their stadiums, and many more will do so in the thousands. Here, too, the financial incentive is powerful; college football teams generate revenue that can range from tens to hundreds of millions of dollars annually, and, in high-powered conferences like the SEC, Big Ten and Big-12, their success often is used to fund other athletic programs at their schools.

All of it matters. And none of it is possible unless having fans games can be deemed safe. So, is it?

“The idea of just opening a stadium and letting the crowds come back to capacity in

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