Dentist arrested for running over woman 2 wks ago | Delhi News

New Delhi: Two weeks after a 38-year-old woman was killed in a road accident in south Delhi’s Lado Sarai, a dentist with a private clinic in Saket has been arrested for allegedly mowing her down and fleeing from the spot.
The victim, who used to work with a private bank as a customer associate and lived on rent in Lado Sarai, was hit while crossing the road.
Police had received a call on November 17 about the accident at the Lado Sarai traffic signal. On reaching the spot, they found the woman, originally from Allahabad in Uttar Pradesh, to be critically injured. She was taken to AIIMS where she was declared brought dead.
On November 26, the victim’s brother tweeted, “I lost my sister, Archana Kushwaha, in an accident on 17th Nov at Lado Sarai Signal Delhi around 8.30PM, till now no clue about car and it’s being 10 days since accident happened (sic).” He also tagged the Prime Minister’s Office, AAP and Delhi Police.
On the day of the accident, crime and forensic teams visited the spot while the victim’s body was sent for a postmortem and her family was informed.
Deputy commissioner of police (south) Atul Thakur said a case of rash driving and causing death due to negligence was registered and a hunt was launched for the accused.
“Multiple teams were formed and CCTV footage from the vicinity were scanned. Following days of surveillance, we zeroed in on a Honda City car and its driver was identified as Pankaj Sudhakar, a resident of Kalkaji Extension,” Thakur said.
The DCP said Sudhakar was driving at a high speed. The accused might have been drunk during the accident, said a source. The car has been seized.

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Regenerative Medicine Market Size, Share to Amass Significant Gains During 2020-2025 – Industry News

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Dec 01, 2020 (Market Insight Reports) —
Selbyville, Delaware. The report Regenerative Medicine Market Size and Analysis maintains enhanced dynamics and is overshadowed by a top player across the globe. The research report provides Regenerative Medicine Market Growth and information corresponding to market segments such as geographies, product type, application, and end-use industry. Experts use the most recent Regenerative Medicine Market research techniques and tools to assemble widespread and precise marketing research reports. A detailed outline about Regenerative Medicine market size and share were combined in this report which gives a comprehensive analysis of different verticals of businesses.

The prevalence of diseases Alzheimera??s, diabetes and other chronic disorders is higher among the aging population across the globe. The incidence of diseases is getting increased day by day among the population. According to the Alzheimera??s Association, it is the 6th leading cause in the United States in 2020 and around 5 million individuals are living with Alzheimera??s. The use of regenerative medicine is getting popular and offers a complete cure from the disease. According to research report a??Global Regenerative Medicine Market Analysis, 2020a??, the Global Regenerative Medicine market is anticipated to grow at a CAGR of around 21.5% during 2020-25.

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Global Regenerative Medicine Market Analysis, 2020 research report depicts a deep dive market analysis of statistics of Global Regenerative Medicine market which consists of regional and country-wise market size, forecast, CAGR market segmentation, market shares of diverse regions and countries, market share of various end-users, applications, product type, technologies, competitive benchmarking, etc.

Pharmaceutical Remains a Dominant Sector

The pharmaceutical sector witnessed immense growth opportunities as more and more companies are indulging in research and studies for regenerative medicine in 2019. Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated in 2018 got approval by FDA for launching their third medicine SYMDEKO for cystic fibrosis (CF) which is a genetic disorder affects liver, kidneys, pancreas, intestine, and lungs. These developments are propelling the growth of regenerative medicine and are expected to witness bolstering demand through 2025 as revealed by the research report a??Global Regenerative Medicine Market Analysis, 2020a??.

Musculoskeletal Disorders is Gaining Pace Across the Globe

The rising occurrence of arthritis and orthopedic diseases among the aging population as well as in the young population. Therefore, musculoskeletal disorders grabbed the largest market share in 2019. Moreover, diseases such as diabetes are also common in the Asian subcontinent. Moreover, around 34.2 million people of all ages or 10.5% of the US population had diabetes in 2018. Approximately, 34.1 million adults aged 18 years or older or 13.0% of all US adults had diabetes, according to US National Diabetes Statistics.

According to the key players with a considerable market share in the Global Regenerative Medicine market include Novartis AG, Vericel, Stryker, Spark Therapeutics, Wright Medical, Pfizer, Abbott, Astra Zenca Ltd., Astellas Pharma Inc., Osiris Therapeutics, Mimedx Group, Organogenesis Inc., Athersys, Inc, Acelity Holdings, Inc, etc.

Key Questions

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First Diversity Week at Stanford Medicine tackles tough topics in medical education, health care | News Center

People are a composite of many interconnected identities, Lassiter said, and taking an “intersectional” point of view is helpful in assessing how diverse, equitable and inclusive a workplace is. As an example, Lassiter described a case study of a particular organization that touted the number of women and people of color in their workforce. 

 The “statistics sound great on the surface, but … when we look at the data from an intersectional perspective, we see that the women in the organization are mostly white women, and the largest group of men in their organization is white men,” Lassiter said. 

 “When organizations say, ‘We’ve increased our numbers of women,’ who are those women?” Lassiter said. Similarly, when groups claim, “’We’ve increased our numbers of people of color,’ who’s included in [their definition of] people of color?” These are the questions that the framework of intersectionality helps us address, Lassiter said.

Diversity, equity and inclusion in medical education

We have to be willing to employ the same kind of rigor we apply to studies of science and medicine to efforts designed to eliminate bias and racism and promote diversity and inclusion, several speakers said.

In 2017, a 10-month program called Leadership, Education and Advancing Diversity, or LEAD, was created to pair Stanford Medicine residents and fellows with mentors who are Stanford Medicine faculty or educational administrators. 

“I had no idea how impactful this work would be,” Carmin Powell, MD, clinical assistant professor of pediatrics, told attendees at the Diversity and Inclusion Forum on Oct. 9. Powell co-directs LEAD with Lahia Yemane, MD. 

Every month, LEAD’s participants take part in discussion-based lectures on various topics related to equity, diversity and inclusion. They also work with their mentors to develop a presentation to deliver at the annual Diversity and Inclusion Forum.

 In just four years, LEAD has tripled in size, growing from 30 scholars and mentors to more than 100, Powell said. Part of the program’s success is its engagement with medical residents and fellows early in their careers, making equity, diversity and inclusion a part of their training.

Knowledge is key

Educating yourself on the history of racism and how to foster diversity and inclusion is essential, said Marc Nivet, executive vice president for institutional advancement at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and keynote speaker at this year’s Diversity and Inclusion Forum.

“If you get nothing else out of today’s talk, I would just implore you to read and to get educated,” Nivet said. 

“You can no longer be an effective leader, period — not just in academic medicine — but period, without being much more elevated in your ability to understand these issues,” he said. “And that comes from reading and learning.”

Learning, trying new things and sharing what does — and doesn’t— work is important for progress, Nivet explained. “I think we don’t share the results of failure, which is typical in academic medicine. We don’t get points for writing about failures or initiatives that didn’t work and why

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Stanford Medicine begins enrolling for COVID-19 vaccine trial | News Center

Stanford Medicine has joined a large, Phase 3 clinical trial of an experimental vaccine against COVID-19.

The trial will test whether the vaccine, which is produced by the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, protects people from the disease. It will enroll some 60,000 people at about 180 sites around the world. The Stanford site is expected to enroll about 1,000 participants.  

Participants will receive either the vaccine or a placebo, and their health and immune responses will be monitored for about one year after their initial visits. If any participants become ill with symptoms of COVID-19, a health care provider will go to their homes to assess their health and collect a nasal sample to test for the presence of the novel coronavirus. If they are infected, Stanford physicians will monitor their disease progression. 

“We’re enrolling a wide variety of participants, but we are particularly interested in those who feel like their home or workplace exposure puts them at risk,” said Philip Grant, MD, assistant professor of medicine and the trial’s principal investigator at Stanford. “Teachers, grocery store workers, people who live in multigenerational households, health care workers and students on campus would all be good candidates for participation.”

Participants will be followed for two years and one month. They are expected to visit the trial site eight times: six in the first year and two in the second year. The initial visit will last about two hours; subsequent visits will consist of a short blood draw and symptom screening. If a participant develops COVID-19 during the study period, additional visits may be required.

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Recover, Restore and Re-open: A Stanford Medicine framework for bouncing back from pandemic | News Center

Last spring, as office buildings emptied and local governments ordered residents to shelter in place, Stanford Medicine faculty members and executives sprang into action to understand more about the mysterious new coronavirus.

Even in the early months of the pandemic, it was clear that a return to normal — bringing students back to classrooms, workers back to offices and travelers back to airlines — would take complex and scientifically grounded policies and guidance.

Now, Stanford Medicine has launched a website to advise various segments of society on getting back to healthy functioning. The effort is called Recover, Restore and Re-open, or R3.

“Our experts’ immediate and steadfast response to the pandemic has built a valuable resource that we feel is imperative to share with the broader community,” said Priya Singh, chief strategy officer and senior associate dean for strategy and communications at Stanford Medicine. “We see the R3 framework as a collection of resources that community members — whether you’re from academia, industry or government, or you’re an individual — can use to inform and guide how they adapt to the uncertainties wrought by COVID-19.”

At the onset of the pandemic, experts from the School of Medicine, Stanford Health Care, Stanford Children’s Health, University HealthCare Alliance and Stanford University began building a framework for broad-based recovery. The group considered the needs of the community, such as developing a strategy for expanded coronavirus testing and building a public health surveillance system to track new cases, and used lessons learned from Stanford’s hospitals to inform preparedness for future inevitabilities, such as a surge in cases and a lack of personal protective equipment.

The R3 framework, which was commissioned by Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the School of Medicine; David Entwistle, president and CEO of Stanford Health Care; and Paul King, president and CEO of Stanford Children’s Health, is powered by more than a dozen Stanford Medicine faculty and leaders. Along with Singh, Bob Harrington, MD, professor and chair of medicine; Mary Leonard, MD, MSCE, professor and chair of pediatrics; and Catherine Krna, MBA, president and CEO of the University HealthCare Alliance, led the R3 committee. Based on the committee’s expertise, the framework is a culmination of the lessons learned while delivering patient care, conducting research and forming policy recommendations as the pandemic evolved.

“Our success in responding so quickly at the beginning of the pandemic was, in part, due to the alignment between the School of Medicine and the clinical enterprises, Stanford Health Care and Stanford Children’s Health,” Krna said. “We would not have been as successful if it weren’t for the joint accountability of our faculty and clinicians and the staff who work with them to care for our patients.”

Guiding current and future response

The R3 framework is a guide to making policy, conducting research and developing treatments, among other things. It’s both a resource for helping communities deal with the pandemic and recover from it. For example, it offers recommendations for protecting vulnerable populations from the virus and safely

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Lawsuit claims video shows Bishop’s Falls guards assaulting unconscious inmate in dentist’s chair | Canada | News

An inmate at a central Newfoundland prison is filing multiple lawsuits, including against corrections officers and a Gander oral surgeon, following an incident that reportedly happened at the surgeon’s office.

The Telegram has learned the man — an inmate at Bishops Falls Corrections Centre whose name is not being made public yet — alleges he was medically sedated at the oral surgeon’s office last month, when a corrections officer was video-recorded performing a dental procedure on him.

The video is believed to have been taken by another corrections officer, while two dental assistants were in the room at one point of the procedure.

The two corrections officers, who took the inmate to the oral surgeon’s office for an undisclosed procedure, were recently escorted out of the Bishop’s Falls facility by RCMP officers, a source told The Telegram earlier this week.

On Tuesday, both the RCMP and the Justice Department turned down requests for comment.

“My first reaction was shock and disbelief. With all due respect to my client. I thought it was incomprehensible and thought maybe he misapprehended what had happened.”

However, when contacted by The Telegram Wednesday, St. John’s lawyer Bob Buckingham confirmed he has been retained to represent the inmate and will file the lawsuit “fairly quickly” on his behalf.

“I haven’t heard of this happening in recent times in Newfoundland,” Buckingham said.

He said the lawsuits will claim battery, assault and breach of trust against the corrections officers; professional negligence and a breach of contract against the oral surgeon and the oral surgeon’s office; breach of trust by the corrections services and the provincial government, as well as vicarious liability against the provincial government, as it is alleged to have happened while corrections officers were on duty.

Buckingham said his client was unconscious at the time of the alleged incident, having been medically sedated, and had no knowledge of what happened when he left the dentist’s office a short time later. He said he learned about it and the video later from corrections administration.

“He understands one of the corrections officers took a video of this, which made the rounds within corrections services,” said Buckingham, adding that both the corrections administration and the RCMP are in possession of the video.

Buckingham said he was appalled to hear what the inmate says happened to him.

“My first reaction was shock and disbelief,” he said. “With all due respect to my client, I thought it was incomprehensible and thought maybe he misapprehended what had happened.

“It’s a very difficult set of circumstances to believe, given a professional involving a dentist and corrections officers who were there for his protection, and the inmate being under medically induced sedation.

“But types of egregious breaches of trust do happen in our province,” added Buckingham, who also represents the family of Jonathan Henoche, an inmate who was killed in segregation at Her Majesty’s Penitentiary in November 2019, in lawsuits against the corrections officers, the prison and the provincial government.

He said

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Precision medicine key to preventing disease developing later in life, Singapore News & Top Stories

SINGAPORE – An individual’s genes can determine the amount of risk he has of developing life-threatening conditions such as heart disease and in turn allows for early intervention.

This is central to the precision medicine programme here, said Professor Tan Chorh Chuan, the chief health scientist from the Ministry of Health and executive director at the Healthcare Transformation Office.

Prof Tan told a webinar on Wednesday (Nov 25) that the programme looks at the genome sequences of participants to help determine the cumulative risks of different diseases based on their genes.

This can be particularly useful for some complaints like premature heart disease, added Prof Tan, who was joined on the webinar panel by Prudential chief executive Dennis Tan and Health Promotion Board (HPB) CEO Zee Yoong Kang.

The event, which covered a broad range of health topics from diabetes and vaccines to strategies on how to stay healthy, is part of The Straits Times Reset 2021 webinar series. It was sponsored by Prudential and moderated by ST senior health correspondent Salma Khalik.

Prof Tan told the webinar that a condition known as familial hypercholesterolemia is caused when a person has a gene that results in high cholesterol levels at a much younger age. If that gene is present, the individual will have up to 20 times higher risk of heart disease – and at an earlier age.

“And then if we identify somebody, we can also test the family. So these preventive strategies will be part of precision health,” he added.

The HPB is working to make use of the clinical, behavioural and digital data as well as genetic data – with patient consent – to identify those at higher risk to allow for early intervention.

Prudential’s Mr Tan said Singaporeans need not be worried about being part of the programme or be concerned if they find out their genome sequences. Having “bad” genes will not make it harder for them to secure insurance policies, he assured.

Privacy is really important, Mr Tan said, adding that “we (Prudential) are very, very careful about such things”.

He said individuals ultimately have to take charge of their own health and should find out more. He said: “Preventive healthcare is all about them being in the driver’s seat, and going through the whole process of early detection, health screening and all.

“So I think as insurers, we will definitely support them.”

Ms Khalik noted that if a person learns that he is at a high risk of getting a certain disease, it will give him the time and opportunity to act before the ailment takes hold.

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Precision Medicine Leader Dennis H. Langer, M.D., J.D. Joins Javelin Oncology’s Board of Directors | News

LEBANON, N.H., Nov. 24, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Javelin Oncology, Inc. announced today that the company has named Dennis H. Langer, M.D., J.D. to the company’s board of directors as an independent director. Dr. Langer has served as a director of several public and private health care companies, and served in leadership roles in several pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostic companies. Dr. Langer was a Senior Vice President at GlaxoSmithKline plc, served as CEO of Neose Technologies, Inc., and was President of Dr. Reddy’s North American business. He is currently a director of Myriad Genetics, Inc., and was previously a director of Dicerna Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sirna Therapeutics, Inc.. Dr. Langer is a graduate of Columbia University, and earned an M.D. at Georgetown University School of Medicine and a J.D. at Harvard Law School.

“We are very fortunate to have Dennis’ counsel and unique skill set to help our team and board as we evolve our promising science towards creating cures for solid tumor cancer patients,” said Steven Yecies, Javelin’s Chief Executive Officer. “His track record and experience in moving promising science to ground-breaking therapies that help patients is a great match for Javelin’s needs. Dennis is a great example of the talent that we seek to surround ourselves with at Javelin and we look forward to his contributions. “

“Javelin has innovative and very promising immune-oncology technology and has assembled strong leadership in its management and on the board,” stated Dr. Langer. “I look forward to working with the company to advance the technology and make a difference for patients with solid cancers.”

More information about Dennis Langer is available at www.javelinoncology.com.

About Javelin Oncology

Javelin Oncology is a leader in precision immune medicine. The company has novel targeting and stratification capabilities that it is utilizing for its own proprietary efforts as well to create a services business to accelerate the science and use of precision immune medicine for others.

Learn more about Javelin Oncology at www.javelinoncology.com.

Contact info
Steven Yecies
CEO, Javelin Oncology
[email protected]

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Glace Bay father happy class-action lawsuit being launched against Bedford dentist | Local | News

GLACE BAY, N.S. —

MacGillivray Injury and Insurance plans to conduct 135 interviews with people who say they were victims of dentist Dr. Errol Guam.

Ryan Binder is one of them and the Glace Bay father was one of the first to contact the law firm after filing complaints with police and the dental board in relation to his six-year-old daughter’s appointment with Gaum on Nov. 10.

“I wanted (Dr. Gaum) to be accountable for all the people he has hurt over the years,” Binder said.

“I feel good about it because I don’t think a big law firm like MacGillivary would take it on if they didn’t think they could win.”

A press release from the firm Friday evening, the day MacGillivary decided to take on the case, indicated they had 60 possible claimants on the suit. By Saturday afternoon that number had more than doubled.

Managing partner Jamie MacGillivray said there was “nothing normal” about this case but couldn’t disclose much more due to it being in the early stages of the process.

“We have 135 phone intakes scheduled over the weekend with two lawyers … and more intake calls have been coming in … there are a lot of people coming two us at this point,” MacGillivray said.

“The first step we have is to determine how to legally file this action … we plan to file the claim this week.”

Binder claimed during his daughter’s appointment with Gaum he hurt and traumatized her by restraining her physically and verbally abusing her during the appointment.

After filing a complaint with the Dental Board of Nova Scotia and Halifax Regional Police, Binder posted about the incident on Facebook on Nov. 11 in hopes of alerting others to what allegedly happened.

By Nov. 12, two Facebook groups were made for victims of Dr. Errol Gaum. One is private and currently has more than 560 members. The other is public and has more than 2,100 members.

Halifax Regional Police confirmed they are currently investigating multiple allegations

Nicole Sullivan is an education, enterprise and diversity reporter for the Cape Breton Post. 

RELATED:

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Does Health Insurance Cover Concierge Medicine? |U.S. News

Does health insurance cover concierge medicine? Are there strategies for getting the most out of your health insurance with respect to concierge medicine?

(Getty Images)

The answers are: sometimes, and yes.

How Concierge Medicine Works

Concierge medicine is a heath care model in which a patient pays a fee – monthly, biannually or annually – directly to their doctor for the practice’s services. Under this model, consumers have access to their doctor or another physician in the practice whenever they want. Patients can make same-day appointments with little or no waiting.

This framework is similar to an arrangement of a client who keeps an attorney on retainer. Such clients can obtain legal services whenever they need them and don’t pay by the hour or case.

Concierge Medicine Costs

As for costs, the annual fee to subscribe to most concierge medicine practices ranges between $1,200 and $3,000, according to conciergemedicinetoday.org. Some high-end concierge medicine practices that provide services to well-off patients can cost tens of thousands of dollars a year, experts say.

Here is the breakdown of payment options that concierge medicine practices accept, according to conciergemedicinetoday.org:

  • Cash only, 51%
  • Medicare or some insurance, 29%
  • Medicare but no HMO or PPO plans, 14%
  • Insurance but no Medicare, 6%

What Health Insurance Does and Does Not Cover

Here are the ways you can use health insurance for concierge medicine:

Medicare or some insurance. If you have Medicare or other health insurance, you can join a concierge medical practice, but you’ll have to pay the membership fee yourself. Regarding Medicare, a concierge medical practice “can’t include additional charges for items or services that Medicare usually covers unless Medicare won’t pay for the item or service,” according to Medicare.gov. In those situations, your physician must give you a written notice, known as an “Advance Beneficiary Notice of Noncoverage,” listing the services and reasons why Medicare may not pay. In such situations, a concierge practice may seek to impose additional fees for services not covered by Medicare, says Michael Seavers, the program lead in Healthcare Informatics at Harrisburg University of Science and Technology in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He notes that Medicare isn’t only used by older people. Individuals under age 65 with certain medical conditions, like renal failure, may also qualify for Medicare.

Similarly, if you have private health insurance, you must pay the fee yourself to become a patient in a concierge practice, says Dr. Amna Husain, a pediatrician and the founder of Pure Direct Pediatrics. That’s a concierge practice in Marlboro, New Jersey. “This fee will include the normal care you received from a non-concierge doctor with the added personal medical amenities the concierge practice offers,” she says.

You may be able to use Medicare or other health insurance to pay for items and services the concierge practice doesn’t provide, which can include:

  • Prescription medications.
  • Lab work.
  • Imaging.
  • Emergency department visits and hospitalizations.

Doctors who accept assignment can’t charge you extra for Medicare-covered services. (In the context of Medicare, “assignment” means your health

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