The Dentist Entrepreneur Organization and Share Moving Media Announce Joint Venture to Publish DSO-focused Dental Trade Magazine

The Dentist Entrepreneur Organization (DEO) is committed to providing emerging dental group leaders access to the connections, education, and resources they need to grow. So, The DEO is excited to announce its joint venture with Share Moving Media to form DEO Media, LLC, publisher of Efficiency In Group Practice Magazine, a resource for dentist entrepreneurs and DSO leaders.

PORTLAND, Ore. (PRWEB) December 03, 2020

The Dentist Entrepreneur Organization (The DEO) of Portland, Oregon and Share Moving Media of Lawrenceville, Georgia announce the formation of a new entity called DEO Media, LLC, a joint venture between the two organizations to publish Efficiency in Group Practice, a bi-monthly dental trade magazine focused on DSOs (dental service organizations) and group dentistry.

“We’re extremely excited to give emerging dental group leaders even more access to the people, education, and resources they need to grow,” said Jacob Puhl, CEO of The DEO. “This partnership further enables us to continue our mission to help dentist entrepreneurs and their executives fulfill their visions. We hope to have a continued positive impact on the dental community.”

Efficiency In Group Practice provides an informational and educational link between manufacturers, distributors, service providers, and dental group practices. Each issue of Efficiency covers emerging trends in dentistry, and provides content to enable group practices to capitalize on their distinct strengths and differences to reach new heights of efficiency and become more profitable.

“This new partnership positions Efficiency in Group Practice with the leadership and direction so dearly needed for a publication to thrive in these dynamic times,” said Share Moving Media CEO John Pritchard. “Now more than ever, dental group practices need insight, understanding and community to grow their practices. We are excited to partner with Jacob Puhl and the entire DEO team to help provide just that!”

Under the partnership, The DEO and Share Moving Media will collaborate on editorial, sales, marketing and distribution of the industry-leading publication. Jacob Puhl, partner and CEO of the Dentist Entrepreneur Organization, will be Efficiency’s publisher.

The first issue from DEO Media, LLC will be the January-February 2021 edition of Efficiency In Group Practice.

About

The Dentist Entrepreneur Organization© (DEO) provides a context, a professional resource, and a peer-to-peer network within a well-managed organizational structure. For more information, visit https://deodentalgroup.com/.

Share Moving Media is a leading publishing and content company providing information, communication and educational services to providers, manufacturers and distributors involved in the business of healthcare. For more information, visit https://sharemovingmedia.com/.

For more information on Efficiency in Group Practice, visit https://www.dentalgrouppractice.com/.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: https://www.prweb.com/releases/the_dentist_entrepreneur_organization_and_share_moving_media_announce_joint_venture_to_publish_dso_focused_dental_trade_magazine/prweb17583024.htm

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To avoid quarantining students, a school district tries moving them around every 15 minutes.

To reduce the number of students sent home to quarantine after exposure to the coronavirus, the Billings Public Schools, the largest school district in Montana, came up with an idea that has public health experts shaking their heads: Reshuffling students in the classroom four times an hour.

The strategy is based on the definition of a “close contact” requiring quarantine — being within 6 feet of an infected person for 15 minutes or more. If the students are moved around within that time, the thinking goes, no one will have had “close contact” and be required to stay home if a classmate tests positive.

Greg Upham, the superintendent of the 16,500-student school district, said in an interview that contact tracing had become a huge burden for the district, and administrators were looking for a way to ease the burden when they came up with the movement idea. It was not intended to “game the system,” he said, but rather to encourage the staff to be cognizant of the 15-minute window.

In an email to administrators last week, Mr. Upham encouraged staff to “whenever possible, disrupt the 15-minute timeline through movement, distancing, and masking.”

Infectious disease experts say that moving students around every few minutes is actually more likely to increase transmission of the virus, by exposing more people to an infected student. It will also complicate contact tracing efforts, they said.

“That is not an evidence-based practice or sound scientific policy,” said Dr. Jennifer Nuzzo, an epidemiologist at the John Hopkins Center for Health Security who has been supportive of reopening schools for in-person instruction.

The 15-minute, 6-foot definition is a guideline for identifying who might be at greater risk of infection, not a hard-and-fast rule about when it can or cannot happen, Dr. Nuzzo said, adding that a person can certainly become infected in less time or from farther away, especially indoors.

Dr. Sarah Fortune, chair of the department of immunology and infectious diseases at Harvard’s school of public health, said the 15-minute definition was meant to help contact tracers “effectively and efficiently identify people with the highest risk and target intervention to them.”

Kelly Hornby, principal of Billings West High School, wrote in an email to his staff last week that moving students around every few minutes and then returning them to their original desks would help dissipate airborne droplets containing coronavirus, to the point “where the risk of being contaminated is greatly reduced.”

Dr. Fortune disagreed with that idea. “The particles that transmit Covid, they hang out in the air, and they spread through the air, and the aerosols can hang out for a very long time,” she said. “So stirring that air up or moving around from your spot doesn’t really limit your exposure or risk.”

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