Pembroke dentist convicted in drunk driving death can’t practice for six months

PEMBROKE —
Pembroke dentist Christy Natsis has lost her license to practice for six months in connection to her past conviction of drunk driving causing death. 

Natis was sentenced to five years in prison in 2012 after being found guilty of drunk driving causing death in a 2011 crash that killed Bryan Casey on Highway 17 near Arnprior. She was granted parole in June of 2019 after serving just 13 months and resumed her practice a short time later. 

A hearing before the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario on Thursday found Natsis guilty of two allegations against her, one of breaking the law and a second of disgraceful, dishonourable, unprofessional or unethical conduct.

The decision means Natsis has been formally reprimanded by the College, will have her license suspended for six months and have her practice monitored with regular visits until April 18, 2023. The suspension will take effect on Dec. 26. She must also pay $7,500 in costs. 

Natsis’ trial was one of the long in Canadian history, dragging on for three years before she was convicted and another two years for appeals to be exhausted. 

Casey, a father of three, was killed in the crash with Natsis on the night of March 31, 2011.

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How This Guy Lost Nearly 40 Pounds in 4 Months and Got Ripped

Tom Boyden, one half of the YouTube fitness channel Juji & Tom, has been on a body transformation journey this year, having lost 37 pounds over the summer. In a new video, Tom breaks down some of the changes he made to his lifestyle in order to aid his weight loss and improve his performance in his workouts.

“If you look at the timeline, I progressively went from 197 pounds in February… then 190 in May,” he says. “And then I just reduced my calories, and slowly started upping my activity. So from May to now, about five months. The vast majority of it has happened in five months. I just had a vast layer of fat over a bunch of nice powerlifting muscles.”

Paying closer attention to nutrition has been the one change that’s had the single biggest impact, Tom explains. “I train all the time, and I work out, but it doesn’t matter if your diet is shit,” he says, adding that he has been finding lower sugar and calorie alternatives to his favorite foods, and reducing his fat intake. He has also been cooking more after falling out of the habit.

In addition to his diet, Tom changed the focus of his exercise, so that he was primarily doing strength training and aesthetic-led bodybuilding workouts. “It’s not that I didn’t train hard over the last two years, but we trained hard over a three-hour workout period,” he says. “Now, the main thing is training, diet, and overall activity, and just what we do in a day.”

“I do faster cardio every morning, walking after meals, just walking in general, riding my bike, trampoline, skateboarding, just all kinds of things,” he continues. “If I’m not active during the day, I’m like ‘what’s going on, why didn’t I go for a walk?’ And I’ll just go stretch, or do some mobility in the garage.”

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In the video, Tom also shares how he was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease as a teenager, recalling how a serious flare-up with his illness this year led to him being hospitalized. But after recovering, he’s back on his fitness routine. He also credits a variety of other semi-related lifestyle changes with having had a positive impact on maintaining his weight loss, including less stress and travel, which have helped him maintain a good sleep schedule and ensure he has the required levels of energy for his workouts.

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Australia has no local case 1st time in months

CANBERRA, Australia — Australia has recorded no new locally transmitted coronavirus infection for the first time in five months.

In Melbourne, the capital of Victoria state, which had the highest number of cases in the country, residents were enjoying the first weekend of cafes, restaurants and pubs reopening to walk-in customers.

The city only has one mystery case without a known source. There are 61 active cases left across the state, down from 70 on Saturday.

State Deputy Premier James Merlino hailed Sunday’s zero figures as “another great day for Victoria,” but urged caution ahead of Australia’s most-prestigious horse race on Tuesday, the Melbourne Cup, known as the “race that stops a nation.” Australians traditionally gather in bars or in private homes to watch the event, a public holiday.

The race attracts crowds of more than 100,000 at Melbourne’s Flemington race course, but this year it will held without fans because of restrictions on public gatherings.


Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton urged Victorians to enjoy the Cup but to continue obeying guidance on mask-wearing and social distancing.

“The great majority of Melburnians know what do to,” Sutton said. “There will be a few who may be a bit liberal in their behavior.”

Sutton said the new wave of infections in Europe showed how quickly the coronavirus can reassert itself.

“What Europe is going through now is a consequence of not being able to get to this point where you can stay on top of very low numbers,” he said. “What we have created is very precious and we need to hold onto it tightly.”

Western Australia state on Sunday recorded one new case of COVID-19, a woman who returned from overseas and is in hotel quarantine.

___

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Halloween in the pandemic: Costumes and candy, at a distance

— England to enter new lockdown; UK virus cases pass 1 million

— Minority US contact tracers build trust in diverse cities

— Efraín Valles guided world leaders, pop stars and a princess on exclusive tours through the land of the Incas. He now makes ice cream to survive amid the pandemic.

— The government of the Netherlands will halt its multibillion euro coronavirus bailout to national carrier KLM amid a standoff with a pilot’s union about terms of the rescue package.

— Austria has announced a partial shutdown that will see restaurants and bars closed for four weeks, cultural, sports and leisure activities canceled, and residents asked to stay home after 8 p.m.

___

Follow AP’s coronavirus pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

___

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

SANTA FE, N.M. — Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham on Saturday said the spread of coronavirus is out of control in New Mexico as she urged residents to stay home and avoid gathering with others to celebrate Halloween.

“Please — do your part to protect yourself and your fellow New Mexicans by celebrating a COVID-SAFE Halloween,” the Democratic governor’s office said in a

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Australia reports no new local cases in months



Police officers and security guards direct bystanders not to pause and stop pedestrian traffic as they try to watch people in Halloween costumes gathered near Tokyo's famed Shibuya traffic intersection Saturday, Oct. 31, 2020. The sign in the background reads, "Refrain from going out to be safe during this year's Halloween." Halloween for Japanese people is simply a fun time, but the city government asked people not to gather because of the pandemic.(AP Photo/Hiro Komae)


© Provided by Associated Press
Police officers and security guards direct bystanders not to pause and stop pedestrian traffic as they try to watch people in Halloween costumes gathered near Tokyo’s famed Shibuya traffic intersection Saturday, Oct. 31, 2020. The sign in the background reads, “Refrain from going out to be safe during this year’s Halloween.” Halloween for Japanese people is simply a fun time, but the city government asked people not to gather because of the pandemic.(AP Photo/Hiro Komae)

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia has recorded no new locally transmitted coronavirus infection for the first time in five months.

In Melbourne, the capital of Victoria state, which had the highest number of cases in the country, residents were enjoying the first weekend of cafes, restaurants and pubs reopening to walk-in customers.

The city only has one mystery case without a known source. There are 61 active cases left across the state, down from 70 on Saturday.

State Deputy Premier James Merlino hailed Sunday’s zero figures as “another great day for Victoria,” but urged caution ahead of Australia’s most-prestigious horse race on Tuesday, the Melbourne Cup, known as the “race that stops a nation.” Australians traditionally gather in bars or in private homes to watch the event, a public holiday.



People wearing face masks as a precaution against the coronavirus line up to receive free food distributed by a non-government organization in Bengaluru, India, Saturday, Oct. 31, 2020. Life in India is edging back to pre-virus levels with shops, businesses, subway trains and movie theaters reopening and the country's third-largest state of Bihar with a population of about 122 million people holding elections. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)


© Provided by Associated Press
People wearing face masks as a precaution against the coronavirus line up to receive free food distributed by a non-government organization in Bengaluru, India, Saturday, Oct. 31, 2020. Life in India is edging back to pre-virus levels with shops, businesses, subway trains and movie theaters reopening and the country’s third-largest state of Bihar with a population of about 122 million people holding elections. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)

The race attracts crowds of more than 100,000 at Melbourne’s Flemington race course, but this year it will held without fans because of restrictions on public gatherings.

Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton urged Victorians to enjoy the Cup but to continue obeying guidance on mask-wearing and social distancing.

“The great majority of Melburnians know what do to,” Sutton said. “There will be a few who may be a bit liberal in their behavior.”

Sutton said the new wave of infections in Europe showed how quickly the coronavirus can reassert itself.

“What Europe is going through now is a consequence of not being able to get to this point where you can stay on top of very low numbers,” he said. “What we have created is very precious and we need to hold onto it tightly.”



People wearing face masks as a precaution against the coronavirus line up to receive free food distributed by a non-government organization in Bengaluru, India, Saturday, Oct. 31, 2020. Life in India is edging back to pre-virus levels with shops, businesses, subway trains and movie theaters reopening and the country's third-largest state of Bihar with a population of about 122 million people holding elections. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)


© Provided by Associated Press
People wearing face masks as a precaution against the coronavirus line up to receive free food distributed by a non-government organization in Bengaluru, India, Saturday, Oct. 31, 2020. Life in India is edging back to pre-virus levels with shops, businesses, subway trains and movie theaters reopening and the country’s third-largest state of Bihar with a population of about 122 million people holding elections. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)

Western Australia state on Sunday recorded one new case of COVID-19, a woman

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Immunity to coronavirus lingers for months, study finds

Immunity to Covid-19 infection lingers for at least five months, researchers reported — and probably longer than that.



a man and a woman looking at her cell phone: PERTH, AUSTRALIA - APRIL 20: Registered nurse Heather Hoppe receives a flu vaccination in the trial clinic at Sir Charles Gairdner hospital on April 20, 2020 in Perth, Australia. Healthcare workers in Western Australia are participating in a new trial to test whether an existing tuberculosis vaccine can help reduce their chances of contracting COVID-19. 2000 frontline staff from Fiona Stanley, Sir Charles Gairdner and Perth Children's Hospital are taking part in the research trial, which will see half of participants receiving the existing Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine in addition to their flu vaccine, while the other half receive the regular flu shot. The BCG vaccine was originally developed to work against tuberculosis, but it is hoped it might help reduce the chance of contracting coronavirus as well as lessen the severity of symptoms and boost immunity in the long term. The BRACE trial is being led by by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute. (Photo by Paul Kane/Getty Images)


© Paul Kane/Getty Images AsiaPac/Getty Images
PERTH, AUSTRALIA – APRIL 20: Registered nurse Heather Hoppe receives a flu vaccination in the trial clinic at Sir Charles Gairdner hospital on April 20, 2020 in Perth, Australia. Healthcare workers in Western Australia are participating in a new trial to test whether an existing tuberculosis vaccine can help reduce their chances of contracting COVID-19. 2000 frontline staff from Fiona Stanley, Sir Charles Gairdner and Perth Children’s Hospital are taking part in the research trial, which will see half of participants receiving the existing Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine in addition to their flu vaccine, while the other half receive the regular flu shot. The BCG vaccine was originally developed to work against tuberculosis, but it is hoped it might help reduce the chance of contracting coronavirus as well as lessen the severity of symptoms and boost immunity in the long term. The BRACE trial is being led by by the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute. (Photo by Paul Kane/Getty Images)

While the report may seem confusing and contradictory to a similar report out of Britain this week, it really isn’t. People’s bodies produce an army of immune compounds in response to an infection and some are overwhelming at first, dying off quickly, while others build more slowly.

The new report out Wednesday shows 90% of people who recover from Covid-19 infections keep a stable antibody response.

“While some reports have come out saying antibodies to this virus go away quickly, we have found just the opposite — that more than 90% of people who were mildly or moderately ill produce an antibody response strong enough to neutralize the virus, and the response is maintained for many months,” Florian Krammer, a professor of vaccinology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, who led the study team, said in a statement.

“This is essential for effective vaccine development.”

The team looked at the antibody responses of more than 30,000 people who tested positive for Covid-19 at Mount Sinai’s Health System between March and October. They characterized their antibody responses as low, moderate or high. More than 90% had moderate to high levels, or titers, of antibodies to the spike protein of the virus — the structure it uses to grapple the cells it infects.

They then closely studied 121 patients who recovered and donated their plasma — once three months after they first developed symptoms, and again five months later.

They did see a drop-off in some antibodies. But others persisted, they reported in the journal Science.

“The serum antibody titer we measured in individuals initially were likely produced by plasmablasts, cells that act as first responders to an invading virus and come together to produce initial bouts of antibodies whose strength soon wanes,” said Dr. Ania Wajnberg, director of Clinical Antibody Testing at the Mount Sinai Hospital.

“The sustained antibody levels that we subsequently observed

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Dr. Fauci warns of a ‘whole lot of pain’ due to coronavirus pandemic in the coming months

White House coronavirus advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci told CNBC in an interview Wednesday that the United States is “going in the wrong direction” as coronavirus cases rise in 47 states and infected patients overwhelm hospitals across the country.

“If things do not change, if they continue on the course we’re on, there’s gonna be a whole lot of pain in this country with regard to additional cases and hospitalizations, and deaths,” the White House coronavirus taskforce member said in an interview Wednesday evening on “The News with Shepard Smith.”

States in the northeast held the virus in check over the summer, but are seeing cases climb again. New York topped half a million confirmed cases while hospitalizations in New Jersey crossed 1,000 for the first time since July.

Fauci noted, however, that cities like New York and Philadelphia are more equipped to deal with the surge, whereas locations in the northwest and heartland are going to have a more difficult time with the pandemic.

“They never had the kind of hospital and intensive care facility and flexibility that some of the larger hospitals in larger cities have,” said Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. “They’re concerned that if the trajectory continues, they may be in a position where they are going to be strapped for things like intensive care beds,” said Fauci.

In the Midwest, cases and hospitalizations are surging at record numbers. Wisconsin had a 7-day positivity rate of 28% while Minnesota reported its highest number of Covid-19 hospitalizations to-date. Hospitalizations have tripled in less than three weeks in El Paso, Texas. Joel Hendricks, the Chief Medical Officer at El Paso’s University Medical Center even warned about the possibility of rationing hospital care there during an interview with NBC’S Gabe Gutierrez.

“Rationing of care is the worst thing doctors ever want to talk about,” said Hendricks. “Having said that, we have looked at that, we’re in the process of looking at that.”

Dr. Fauci told Smith that he doesn’t foresee the United States taking the same lockdown measures that Melbourne, Australia took to curb its summer spike in cases. Melbourne only reopened Wednesday after spending three months shutdown.

“There is very little appetite for a lockdown in this country,” said Fauci. “There’s going to be major pushback both from above and at the local level, however, what Melbourne did, what Australia did as a country, was very successful.”

Dr. Fauci suggested doubling down on masks, distancing, and avoiding crowds and congregations amid Americans’ coronavirus fatigue, and added that the country would “be much better than we’re doing right now.”

For more of Dr. Anthony Fauci’s interview with Shepard Smith, watch the full interview above.

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U.K study finds sharp drop in COVID-19 antibodies just months after infection

One of the vexing things about coronaviruses like the common cold is that the immune response they induce is often short-lived. You catch a cold, recover and then catch it again six months later.

New research published Tuesday indicates fading immunity might also occur with the much more serious coronavirus, SARS CoV-2. Imperial College London scientists found that in a random sample of 365,000 adults in the United Kingdom, the presence of COVID-19 antibodies declined in all age groups by 26% from June to September.

The subjects in the REACT2 study, which has not been peer-reviewed, were given finger-prick tests in three rounds over the summer. After the first round, which ended in July, about 60 of 1,000 people in the sample, or 6%, had positive antibodies. By the end of September, that number had fallen to 44 per 1,000 (4.4%).

Age appeared to affect antibody duration. Younger people had higher levels than those over 65, and their antibodies lasted longer.


A faster decline in antibodies was observed in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic cases than in those with full-blown symptoms, said Professor Wendy Barclay, head of the college’s infectious disease department, in a video call with journalists. Health care workers showed no change in antibody levels, possibly due to continuous on-the-job exposure to the virus.

“On the balance of evidence, I would say, with what we know for other coronaviruses, it would look as if immunity declines away at the same rate as antibodies decline away, and that this is an indication of waning immunity at the population level,” Barclay added.

“We don’t yet know what level of antibody is needed in a person’s blood to prevent reinfection,” she added.

Just a handful of cases of people getting COVID-19 twice have been confirmed. But immunity from the first wave of infections in March and April may only now be starting to dissipate, raising the prospect of more repeat cases, according to epidemiologists.

The findings suggest that those expecting increased infections to result in so-called herd immunity over time could be disappointed.

Herd immunity occurs when enough of a population is immune to a disease, making it unlikely to spread and protecting the rest of the community.

If no vaccine is developed, the portion of the population that would have to recover from COVID-19 in order to achieve herd immunity is estimated at about 70%, or more than 200 million people in the United States, according to the Mayo Clinic.

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Study suggests coronavirus immunity drops after 3 months

A new study suggests immunity to coronavirus may drop over several months.

Over 365,000 people across England took finger prick tests from late June to September, as part of Imperial College London’s Real-time Assessment of Community Transmission (REACT) study. Findings were published ahead of peer review on Thursday.

Findings stemmed from finger prick tests, researchers said. (iStock)

Findings stemmed from finger prick tests, researchers said. (iStock)

The finger pricks tested for coronavirus antibodies, and results revealed a drop from nearly 6% to 4.4% over a three-month span, which researchers said translates to a 26.5% decline.

If a person tests positive for antibodies, it means they were once infected.

ALMOST 800,000 KIDS HAVE CONTRACTED CORONAVIRUS IN US, PEDIATRICIANS SAY

“Our study shows that over time there is a reduction in the proportion of people testing positive for antibodies,” Paul Elliott, study author and professor at Imperial College London, said in a university news release. “It remains unclear what level of immunity antibodies provide, or for how long this immunity lasts.”

The study and university release included suggestions over declining immunity.

“These findings suggest that there may be a decline in the level of immunity in the population in the months following the first wave of the epidemic,” per the university release. Likewise, the study says: “These data suggest the possibility of decreasing population immunity and increasing risk of reinfection as detectable antibodies decline in the population.”

More specifically, the study tested for detectable IgG antibodies. When a virus attacks, the body first produces IgM antibodies, which indicate active or recent infection. IgG antibodies develop later, and often indicate a past infection.

CLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

Across three rounds in the REACT study, 17,576 results returned positive, and 30% of people were asymptomatic. The largest reduction in antibody prevalence was among the oldest age group, 75 and above, at 39%, per the university release. The youngest age group saw the least reduction at nearly 15%. 

A lead study author stressed the importance of mitigation measures. 

“This very large study has shown that the proportion of people with detectable antibodies is falling over time,” said Helen Ward, professor at Imperial College London. “We don’t yet know whether this will leave these people at risk of reinfection with the virus that causes COVID-19, but it is essential that everyone continues to follow guidance to reduce the risk to themselves and others.”

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Eight months into the pandemic, nurses say they still aren’t getting the safety equipment they need

Hospital Nurses
Hospital Nurses

Nurses hold a meeting on one of five Covid-19 wards at Whiston Hospital in Merseyside where patients are taken to recover from the virus. Peter Byrne/PA Images via Getty Images

This article originally appeared here on Salon.com

Since the start of the pandemic, around 635,000 Americans have been hospitalized for symptoms related to COVID-19, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The massive hospital influx of COVID-19 patients in this span has taxed the American healthcare system, in particular nurses, who deal with the minute-by-minute needs of these hundreds of thousands of patients. Unfortunately, many of those nurses say they have not been receiving the help that they need in return.

According to a report released last month by National Nurses United, the largest organization of registered nurses in the United States, at least 213 nurses in the United States have died of COVID-19 and related complications since Sept. 16, nearly three-fifths of whom were nurses of color. (By contrast, just under one fourth of American registered nurses are people of color.) National Nurses United also told Salon that 232 nurses have died overall as of Friday.

The National Nurses United report also found that at least 1,718 health care workers have died of COVID-19 and related complications, including registered nurses; nearly one-third of the hospital health care workers who suffered this fate were registered nurses. Overall, their report found that there have been at least 258,768 cases of COVID-19 among health care workers, a number representing 166 percent of the 156,306 cases reported by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In other words, their report states that the CDC is underreporting them.

Nurses are noticing this, too. A survey released in July of more than 21,200 nurses nationwide found that only 24 percent of nurses believe their employer is making sure they have a safe workplace. Only 31 percent say that every patient is screened for COVID-19. 36 percent are afraid of developing COVID-19, and 43 percent are afraid that they will spread the disease to a family member.

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The data is even more sobering when it comes to personal protective equipment, or PPE, with 87 percent of nurses saying they were required to reuse at least one piece of PPE at some point. Nurses also report chronic understaffing issues, with 27 percent of those who work in hospitals reporting that staffing has declined in recent months, even though the likelihood of patient death increases by 7 percent for every extra patient in a hospital nurse’s workload.

“I’m so disappointed in our lack of preparation as a country for a pandemic,” a nurse from Pennsylvania wrote to Salon. “N95s [a type of surgical mask with a respirator on it] quickly became sparse and we were forced to reuse them for days, basically until [they] broke, when they are intended per the manufacturer to be single/ one time use. We had to put them in a brown paper bag in

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Dr. Fauci Says Trump Hasn’t Been to White House COVID-19 Task Force Meetings in ‘Several Months’

Donald Trump has been absent from White House COVID-19 task force meetings for “several months,” says White House coronavirus advisor Dr. Fauci.

According to CNBC, Vice President Pence leads the task force meetings that used to occur every day during the first few months of the pandemic but have now been scaled down to one virtual meeting a week despite cases continuing to rise.

“We certainly interact with the vice president at the task force meetings, and the vice president makes our feelings and what we talk about there known to the president,” Fauci told MSNBC’s Chuck Todd. 

Related: Fauci quotes ‘The Godfather’ in response to Trump criticisms

Trump apparently receives all of his information via Pence and coronavirus advisor Scott Atlas, according to the director of the National Institutes of Health Dr. Francis Collins, who did an interview with NPR on Monday. Dr. Collins also sits on the task force.

“The President is routinely briefed about the coronavirus each and every day,” White House spokeswoman Sarah Matthews told CNBC in a statement. “The relevant information is brought to him on the big decisions, and then he moves forward in the way that’s best for our country.”

While the President misses task force meetings, the United States is averaging nearly 61,000 new cases of COVID-19 on a daily basis, CNBC cited. Texas currently has the most cases out of any other state of the last seven days, currently sitting at 35,292 according to CDC COVID data tracker.

Trump has also gone on record to ridicule Dr. Fauci, saying that he is tired of listening to him. 

“Fauci is a disaster. If I listened to him, we’d have 500,000 deaths,” he said, later repeating himself and raising the number even higher. “If there’s a reporter on, you can have it just the way I said it, I couldn’t care less.”

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