Lobe Sciences Announces Launch of Preclinical Study in Collaboration with the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

(MENAFN – Newsfile Corp) Lobe Sciences Announces Launch of Preclinical Study in Collaboration with the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Vancouver, British Columbia–(Newsfile Corp. – November 30, 2020) – Lobe Sciences Ltd. (CSE: LOBE) (OTC Pink: GTSIF) (” Lobe ” or the ” Company “) is pleased to announce the launch of preclinical research studies using psilocybin and N-Acetylcysteine (” NAC “) for the treatment of mild traumatic brain injury/concussion (” mTBI “) with post-traumatic stress disorder (” PTSD “). The study is in collaboration with a multidisciplinary team of scientists and physicians at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine under the lead of Michael E. Hoffer, M.D., professor of otolaryngology and neurological surgery.

NAC has been shown to be safe and efficacious in a phase I human clinical study in treating military personnel who had suffered mTBI. The initial research focus is to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the combination of psilocybin and NAC using broadly accepted rodent models. Final results are expected in 2021. Once this is established, more specific work can examine dose response, medicine uptake, and medicine levels. The research team at the Miller School of Medicine has conducted prior studies involving NAC with mTBI and has a license from the United States Drug Enforcement Administration to conduct research using Schedule I controlled substances, which includes psilocybin.

The Miller School of Medicine is an internationally recognized leader in medical research, ranked No. 39 among the top medical schools in the nation by Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research. In 2019, the medical school submitted 1,968 research proposals and was awarded $149 million in research funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Advances in neuro-diagnostic assessment have revealed mild traumatic brain injury (concussion) is more common than previously thought and potentially associated with a host of negative health outcomes. The Centers for Disease Control (” CDC “) estimates that there are 3 million emergency room visits and over 230,000 hospitalizations due to TBI in any given year in the United States alone. Also, at the same time there are 5.3 million Americans living with the effects of mTBI (a 53% increase over ten years ago). The World Health Organization calls traumatic brain injury a “silent epidemic” that affects over 70 million individuals across the world. The United States Department of Defense estimates that over 345,000 individuals are affected by mTBI and that 20% of all service members who deploy suffer mTBI. mTBI and PTSD are significant health care issues that often co-occur and impact each other.

Dr. Hoffer, the principal investigator on the study, said, “This a very important extension of our work with NAC and other medicines to identify new treatments for mTBI and PTSD. We are hopeful that this new combination of psilocybin with NAC will lead us to better solutions for those suffering from mTBI and/or PTSD.”

Maghsoud Dariani, Chief Science Officer of Lobe said, “We are very excited to begin the preclinical studies in collaboration with Dr.

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Miami Zoo’s resident dentist gives animals check ups for dental week



a group of people sitting around a dog: MailOnline logo


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Dental health is as important for animals as it is for humans.

This week, the furry and fanged residents of Miami-Dade Zoological Park and Gardens, also known as Zoo Miami, went to the dentist. 

A variety of procedures were performed during Dental Week, from cleanings to root canals, and patients included a lion, gorilla, chimpanzee, tapir, aardvark and otters. 

The most common issue was removing accumulated tarter, as well as cracked or broken teeth that had to be repaired or extracted.

All the animals were fully sedated, both for their comfort and the dentist’s safety.

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a person sitting on the floor: Barney, a 27-year-old-gorilla, getting a tooth extracted during 'Dental Week' at Zoo Miami


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Barney, a 27-year-old-gorilla, getting a tooth extracted during ‘Dental Week’ at Zoo Miami

‘We have never had an animal wake up during a procedure,’ said zoo ambassador Ron Magill. ‘They are carefully monitored by an anesthesia team and if they show any sign of awakening, they are administered additional anesthesia to keep them fully sedated.’

Because animals generally don’t complain about dental pain, veterinarians often refer to it as ‘silent suffering.’

By the time anything is discovered, the disease or infection may be so far along that it’s debilitating – or even fatal.

General dental exams are performed on animals during regular health examinations.



a group of stuffed animals sitting next to a woman: Kashifa, a 10-year-old lioness, was well sedated before her tooth was extracted. 'We have never had an animal wake up during a procedure,' said zoo ambassador Ron Magill


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Kashifa, a 10-year-old lioness, was well sedated before her tooth was extracted. ‘We have never had an animal wake up during a procedure,’ said zoo ambassador Ron Magill



a dog wearing a hat: Sedation lasts about three to eight hours, with the dosage depending on the size and age of the animal


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Sedation lasts about three to eight hours, with the dosage depending on the size and age of the animal

If an issue is diagnosed, the zoo’s veterinarians will either resolve it themselves or, depending on its severity, enlist a veterinary dental specialist.

‘Dental health is a key component of the Animal Health Department’s preventative medicine program at Zoo Miami,’ said Magill, who snapped photos of the unusual proceedings. ‘A variety of issues ranging from gum disease to broken teeth can lead to critical care issues that may result in serious infection and even death without treatment.’



a person petting a dog: Veterinary dentist Jamie Berning and her veterinary technician, Jill Bates, traveled to Miami from Columbus, Ohio, to perform procedures on a variety of animals


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Veterinary dentist Jamie Berning and her veterinary technician, Jill Bates, traveled to Miami from Columbus, Ohio, to perform procedures on a variety of animals



a person wearing a costume: The most common issue was removing accumulated tarter, as well as cracked or broken teeth that had to be repaired or extracted


© Provided by Daily Mail
The most common issue was removing accumulated tarter, as well as cracked or broken teeth that had to be repaired or extracted

This week, veterinary dentist Jamie Berning and her veterinary technician, Jill Bates, traveled to Miami from Columbus, Ohio, to perform procedures on a variety of animals.

Barney, the zoo’s 27-year-old gorilla, Hondo, a 26-year-old chimpanzee, and Kashifa, a 10-year-old lioness all had to have teeth extracted.

The procedures, which took between two and seven hours, were spread out over three days.

Sedation lasts about three to eight hours, with the dosage depending on the size and age of the animal.

Dr. Berning was able to treat two to three animals a day.



a person holding an object in his mouth: Hondo, a 26-year-old chimpanzee, also had to have a tooth extracted


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Zoo Miami animals see the dentist: Pictures

Getting teeth pulled is never fun.

But it takes more than a needle and numbness to work on a lion. Or a gorilla. Even an otter. We’re talking sleepy time here for the safety of everyone.

This week, several animals at Zoo Miami had dental exams as part of their overall health screenings. Animals including a 27-year-old gorilla, a 26-year-old chimpanzee named Hondo and a 10-year-old lion named Kashifa had to have teeth extracted.

“Dental health is a key component of the Animal Health Department’s preventative medicine program at Zoo Miami,” said Ron Magill in a statement. “A variety of issues ranging from gum disease to broken teeth can lead to critical care issues that may result in serious infection and even death without treatment.”

Magill said that since animals “don’t complain” about dental issues, dental disease is generally referred to as “silent suffering.”

Over the past week, veterinary dentist Dr. Jamie Berning from Midwest Mobile Veterinary Dentistry, along with her veterinary technician, Jill A. Bates, came from Ohio to work on the Zoo Miami animals, which also included a tapir and an aardvark.

And, yes, they were all put under before the work commenced.

Now that their teeth are all nice and tingly clean, they have returned to their regular zoo habitats.

Carli Teproff grew up in Northeast Miami-Dade and graduated from Florida International University in 2003. She became a full-time reporter for the Miami Herald in 2005 and now covers breaking news.

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Miami strip club allowed to defy county’s ‘illegal’ COVID-19 curfew, judge says

A small victory in Miami on Friday could shift the power in favor of businesses who are fighting against local COVID-19 restrictions in South Florida.

Tootsie’s strip club in Miami Gardens won in a civil lawsuit against Miami-Dade County, and will be able to stay open past the county’s coronavirus curfew, which the judge called “illegal.”

The curfew has been in place nearly three months to help curb the spread of the coronavirus. Restaurants were forced to close their dining rooms at midnight, which is when clubs typically open. In a number of cases, establishments such as Tootsie’s that stayed open were fined and forced to shut down at midnight.

The situation has been similar in Broward. Earlier this month, nightclub owners demanded answers from Broward Mayor Dale Holness, who said businesses would still have to shut down at 11 p.m. even after Gov. Ron DeSantis allowed South Florida into a Phase 2 reopening.

In Miami-Dade, Judge Beatrice Butchko ruled that Tootsie’s can operate all night because of DeSantis’ statewide decree, which effectively snatched power from local governments to enforce COVID-19 restrictions on businesses.

DeSantis’ order allowed counties and cities to set capacity limits for restaurants, but kept local governments from issuing rules that kept people from working.

“The Miami-Dade curfew orders conflict with [DeSantis’ executive order] because they prohibit Tootsie’s from operating; they prohibit employees and contractors from working; and they reduce capacity to zero for the entire time subject to the curfew,” Butchko wrote in the ruling.

Sports radio host Andy Slater broke the news that Tootsie’s won the suit.

Miami-Dade and Broward imposed the curfews in July to crack down on late-night parties in bars, streets and in private homes. The curfews also affected restaurants that had to close their dining rooms early.

Sun Sentinel staff writer Rafael Olmeda contributed to this report.

Brooke Baitinger can be reached at: [email protected], 954-422-0857 or Twitter: @bybbaitinger

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©2020 the Sun Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.)

Visit the Sun Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.) at www.sun-sentinel.com

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