The Dentist Entrepreneur Organization and Share Moving Media Announce Joint Venture to Publish DSO-focused Dental Trade Magazine

The Dentist Entrepreneur Organization (DEO) is committed to providing emerging dental group leaders access to the connections, education, and resources they need to grow. So, The DEO is excited to announce its joint venture with Share Moving Media to form DEO Media, LLC, publisher of Efficiency In Group Practice Magazine, a resource for dentist entrepreneurs and DSO leaders.

PORTLAND, Ore. (PRWEB) December 03, 2020

The Dentist Entrepreneur Organization (The DEO) of Portland, Oregon and Share Moving Media of Lawrenceville, Georgia announce the formation of a new entity called DEO Media, LLC, a joint venture between the two organizations to publish Efficiency in Group Practice, a bi-monthly dental trade magazine focused on DSOs (dental service organizations) and group dentistry.

“We’re extremely excited to give emerging dental group leaders even more access to the people, education, and resources they need to grow,” said Jacob Puhl, CEO of The DEO. “This partnership further enables us to continue our mission to help dentist entrepreneurs and their executives fulfill their visions. We hope to have a continued positive impact on the dental community.”

Efficiency In Group Practice provides an informational and educational link between manufacturers, distributors, service providers, and dental group practices. Each issue of Efficiency covers emerging trends in dentistry, and provides content to enable group practices to capitalize on their distinct strengths and differences to reach new heights of efficiency and become more profitable.

“This new partnership positions Efficiency in Group Practice with the leadership and direction so dearly needed for a publication to thrive in these dynamic times,” said Share Moving Media CEO John Pritchard. “Now more than ever, dental group practices need insight, understanding and community to grow their practices. We are excited to partner with Jacob Puhl and the entire DEO team to help provide just that!”

Under the partnership, The DEO and Share Moving Media will collaborate on editorial, sales, marketing and distribution of the industry-leading publication. Jacob Puhl, partner and CEO of the Dentist Entrepreneur Organization, will be Efficiency’s publisher.

The first issue from DEO Media, LLC will be the January-February 2021 edition of Efficiency In Group Practice.

About

The Dentist Entrepreneur Organization© (DEO) provides a context, a professional resource, and a peer-to-peer network within a well-managed organizational structure. For more information, visit https://deodentalgroup.com/.

Share Moving Media is a leading publishing and content company providing information, communication and educational services to providers, manufacturers and distributors involved in the business of healthcare. For more information, visit https://sharemovingmedia.com/.

For more information on Efficiency in Group Practice, visit https://www.dentalgrouppractice.com/.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: https://www.prweb.com/releases/the_dentist_entrepreneur_organization_and_share_moving_media_announce_joint_venture_to_publish_dso_focused_dental_trade_magazine/prweb17583024.htm

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Fact check: No, the media didn’t suddenly change its reporting on coronavirus immunity after Trump got infected

The story goes like this: The media had always said that people who survived a Covid-19 infection would be immune from the virus for life. But once he, Trump, got infected and survived, the media started claiming immunity only lasted for months.

“And until I came along — you know, you used to hear you have immunity for life, right? As soon as I had it and got better, they were not too happy about that…It was supposed to be for life; when it was me, they said it’s only good for four months, okay? Okay. Anybody else it’s for life, with Trump they said it’s four months. So they brought it down now, immunity, from life to four months,” Trump said at his Tuesday rally in Lansing, Michigan.
Trump told a similar story at his Tuesday rally in Omaha, Nebraska: “But because it was me, the press said, ‘No, it’s not for a lifetime. It’s only for four months. The immunity is only now for four months.’ They brought it down, right? It was always gonna be for a lifetime, now it’s four months.”

Trump said much the same thing at a Wednesday rally in Bullhead City, Arizona, this time adding that “they’ve changed the whole medical standard” because of his own infection.

Facts First: Trump’s story is false. In the months before Trump tested positive for Covid-19 in early October, numerous major media outlets had reported that scientists were not yet sure how long survivors might have immunity. While we can’t definitively say there was no media report whatsoever from before Trump’s infection that had claimed survivors would get lifetime immunity, it was certainly not widely reported that survivors were immune for life.

A CNN fact check in July concluded: “It remains unclear if those already infected with the virus are immune to any reinfection. Additionally, it’s unknown how long any sort of immunity would last.” A CNN story in mid-August was headlined, “Are you immune to Covid-19 for three months after recovering? It’s not clear.” And CNN wrote in August about a Nevada man who was infected with the virus twice — quoting Mark Pandori, the director of the Nevada State Public Health Laboratory, as saying: “After one recovers from COVID-19, we still do not know how much immunity is built up, how long it may last, or how well antibodies play a role in protection against a reinfection.”

Even upbeat media stories about optimistic findings about immunity noted that the facts had not been conclusively settled.

For example, an August article in the New York Times said that “scientists who have been monitoring immune responses to the coronavirus for months are now starting to see encouraging signs of strong, lasting immunity, even in people who developed only mild symptoms of Covid-19, a flurry of new studies has found.” But that piece continued by saying that “researchers cannot forecast how long these immune responses will last.”
The Washington Post also made clear in August that “researchers
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Media Multitasking Disrupts Memory, Even in Young Adults

The bulky, modern human brain evolved hundreds of thousands of years ago and, for the most part, has remained largely unchanged. That is, it is innately tuned to analog information—to focus on the hunt at hand or perhaps the forage for wild plants. Yet we now pummel our ancient thinking organ with a daily deluge of digital information that many scientists believe may have enduring and worrisome effects.

A new study published today in Nature supports the concern. The research suggests that “media multitasking”—or engaging with multiple forms of digital or screen-based media simultaneously, whether they are television, texting or Instagram—may impair attention in young adults, worsening their ability to later recall specific situations or experiences.

The authors of the new paper used electroencephalography—a technique that measures brain activity—and eye tracking to assess attention in 80 young adults between the ages of 18 and 26. The study participants were first presented with images of objects on a computer screen and asked to classify the pleasantness or size of each one. After a 10-minute break, the subjects were then shown additional objects and asked whether they were already classified or new. By analyzing these individuals’ brain and eye responses as they were tasked with remembering, the researchers could identify the number of lapses in their attention. These findings were then compared to the results of a questionnaire the participants were asked to fill out that quantified everyday attention, mind wandering and media multitasking.

Higher reported media multitasking correlated with a tendency toward attentional lapses and decreased pupil diameter, a known marker of reduced attention. And attention gaps just prior to remembering were linked with forgetting the earlier images and reduced brain-signal patterns known to be associated with episodic memory—the recall of particular events.

Previous work had shown a connection between media multitasking and poorer episodic memory. The new findings offer clues as to why this might be the case. “We found evidence that one’s ability to sustain attention helps to explain the relationship between heavier media multitasking and worse memory,” says the paper’s lead author Kevin Madore, a postdoctoral fellow in the department of psychology at Stanford University. “Individuals who are heavier media multitaskers may also show worse memory because they have lower sustained attention ability.”

“This is an impressive study,” comments Daphne Bavelier, a professor of psychology at the University of Geneva in Switzerland, who was not involved in the new research. “The work is important as it identifies a source of interindividual variability when one is cued to remember information”—the differences in attention among the study participants. “These findings are novel and tell us something important about the relationship between attention and memory, and their link to everyday behavior …, [something] we did not know before,” adds Harvard University psychologist Daniel L. Schacter, who was also not involved in the study.

Madore points out that the new findings are, for now, correlational. They do not indicate if media multitasking leads to impaired attention or if people with worse attention

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Trump claims the worsening U.S. coronavirus outbreak is a ‘Fake News Media Conspiracy’ even as hospitalizations rise

  • President Donald Trump claimed the worsening coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. is a “Fake News Media Conspiracy,” saying the nation only has the most cases in the world because “we TEST, TEST, TEST.”
  • Trump has repeatedly downplayed the virus and has insisted that the U.S. has more cases than any other country because the nation tests more people.
  • Public health officials and infectious disease experts dispute that claim, saying the rate of tests that are positive and hospitalizations are on the rise in several states



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: US President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at Manchester-Boston Regional Airport in Londonderry, New Hampshire on October 25, 2020.


© Provided by CNBC
US President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at Manchester-Boston Regional Airport in Londonderry, New Hampshire on October 25, 2020.

President Donald Trump on Monday claimed the worsening coronavirus outbreak in the United States is a “Fake News Media Conspiracy,” saying the nation only has the most cases in the world because “we TEST, TEST, TEST.”

“Corrupt Media conspiracy at all time high,” Trump said in a tweet Monday morning. “On November 4th., topic will totally change,” he added, referring to the day after the presidential election.

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Trump’s tweet came as the U.S. is reporting a record-breaking number of new coronavirus cases. On Sunday, the country has reported an average of about 68,767 new cases every day, the highest seven-day average recorded yet, according to a CNBC analysis of Hopkins data. The U.S. reported 60,789 new Covid cases Sunday after daily cases reached  83,757 on Friday, passing the last record of roughly 77,300 cases seen on July 16, according to Hopkins data.

Trump, who tested positive for the virus earlier this month, has repeatedly downplayed the virus and insisted that the U.S. has more cases than any other country because the nation tests more people. But public health officials and infectious disease experts dispute that claim, saying the rate of tests that are positive and hospitalizations are both on the rise in several states.



chart, histogram


© Provided by CNBC


The overall U.S. positivity rate, or the percentage of Covid-19 tests that come back positive, is at 6.2%, up from around 5.2% last week, according to Hopkins. Illinois, where businesses are bracing for new coronavirus restrictions amid a rise in new Covid cases, has a positivity rate of 6.3%. Wisconsin, which hit a record high in average daily cases Sunday, has a positivity rate of 16%. Kentucky, another state that hit a new high, has a positivity rate of 8.4%.

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Additionally, Covid-19 hospitalizations were growing by 5% or more in 34 states as of Sunday, according to a CNBC analysis of data collected by the Covid Tracking Project. Fifteen states hit record highs in hospitalizations. El Paso County in Texas enacted a curfew after ICUs in the area reached full capacity. The increase in hospitalizations could

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Fitness Influencers, Please Don’t Spread COVID-19 Misinformation on Social Media

My fellow fitness instructors, trainers, coaches, and influencers:

I beg you, please, for the love of the people’s health, do not use your platform to spread misinformation about COVID-19. Really, please. As someone who spent eight years getting a master’s and a Ph.D. in public health (partially focused on health communication), some of the posts and comments I have seen floating around the ’gram from fitness or yoga accounts, quite frankly, terrify me—like that people are blowing the virus out of proportion, or that it’s not actually that big of a deal. All things that we’ve also heard from our current administration.

The spread of this misinformation matters because it misleads beliefs and behaviors. It is detrimental not only to your individual followers or clients, but also to the public as a whole. COVID-19 is real. This is a global pandemic. Every person who contracts COVID-19 has the capability to further spread the virus, thus prolonging its life. Public health communication researchers and practitioners work tirelessly to figure out how to best communicate the right information in the right way to the right people; spreading misinformation has the potential to undo all of that.

As leaders and role models in the fitness and movement space, I want us to do better. Your followers and clients look to you for fitness guidance, workouts, and expertise. They see you as a reliable source and are used to taking your advice on anything in the wellness space. They are primed to believe what you put out, especially if you self-identify or have otherwise been anointed as a “health expert.” You’ve heard it before: With great power comes great responsibility. We need to accept that responsibility and take it seriously.

I do understand that there is a plethora of COVID-19 information circulating, so much of it seemingly contradictory and thus potentially confusing and frustrating. The most well-meaning of us can easily fall into the trap of assuming something’s accuracy if we aren’t paying close attention. Add to that the fear for our own health or our careers and the grief for the lives we were living before March, along with the anger and anxiety about our reality today, and we are especially primed to react to COVID-19 news, especially involving headlines that are specifically crafted to activate negative emotions.

Reacting too quickly to COVID-19 news without first verifying it can lead to further disseminating misinformation, even unintentionally. In a social media sense, that translates to sending, sharing, reposting, or commenting something that spreads uninformed or ill-informed messaging. Doing so means you have now become a vector; you are now perpetuating the pandemic of misinformation and contributing to the pandemic of COVID-19.

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Fear of the Dentist – Movies, Media and Negative Images

Anyone who has read Mary Shelly’s fictional novel, “Frankenstein,” or has seen any of the myriad of Hollywood horror films beginning with Boris Karloff’s portrayal of the tragic monster, are aware that Victor Frankenstein, the doctor responsible for it’s creation, was a physician who had higher purpose on his mind and a mad scientist’s ego as his driving force.

I am surprised however, that given our profession’s negative and painful image, the title character wasn’t a dentist. After all, though we are quite respected within our communities and do possess the technology to create nearly painless dental experiences, dentistry has been, and still remains, among the most feared and hated of all health professions. Over the years I’ve heard more than a few women comment at social gatherings, “I’d rather have a baby than a root canal.” Dental treatment can make the strongest man in the world sweaty and weak at the knees. The fact that Frankenstein was an MD and not a DDS or a DMD is of some, but frankly, very little comfort.

Even though the dental profession has taken many positive steps towards making dental treatment more comfortable for the public, the negative image of uncaring dentists and painful dentistry has been drilled into the minds of the public for years, not only through negative personal experiences and dental “horror” stories, but also through books, cartoons, TV shows and films. Sadly, that representation continues today through the same channels as well through the Internet, websites, blogging, and YouTube movies.

Unfair and negative depictions of dentists as comic relief or as aloof, uncaring and sadistic, and negatively slanted depictions of dental treatment by the arts and media have scared the psyche of the public and created unnecessary fear. The saddest point is that even in 2010, there are still few if any positive dental characters or memorable passages from books or scenes from movies to counterbalance that negative image. Unfortunately, there are no friendly and affable neighborhood dentists, like Dr. Marcus Welby, MD.

Popular culture has not been kind to dentists. It began with classic paintings of barber who were the dentists of that era, standing on top of horrified, screaming patients with some kind of medieval tool in hand.

As a child, I remember characters in old black-and-white cartoons that devised contraptions of ropes, pulleys and doorknobs to remove a tooth rather than go to the dentist. These images continue to the present in many cartoon series.

In films by the classic comedy duo, Laurel and Hardy, or on episodes in the 1950’s Abbott and Costello TV show, I remember the pained expression on Oliver Hardy’s or Lou Costello’s handkerchief-wrapped face. A string was tied to his tooth and then tied to a doorknob on the other end. Then the other partner slams the door and the tooth goes flying. Funny Huh?

The number one phobia producing film is the 1976 film version of William Goldman’s book, The Marathon Man. In it, there are scenes in which …

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P Cubed Presentations Are Product Of Story, Media And Their Delivery

Helpful best healthcare internet sites, wellness blogs, healthcare forums,health-related powerpoint presentations, health-related mnemonics, free healthcare books , software , videos , journals, exam preparation tips, clinical expertise, health-related news,android applications,health-related images, animations, medical entrance mcqs,usmle forums. This of course can lead to a more comprehensive hospital stay. If you are infected, you will be permitted to continue with the course but your practice might be restricted for particular surgical procedures on sufferers known as ‘exposure prone’ procedures.

The blue rose represents the believed that Jess will often be with us. The blue button implies we usually fight for patient access to data, just like Jess. In order to deal with the ever rising amounts of data in healthcare and biomedical study, our faculty, students, and employees investigate and develop novel computational, statistical, organizational, and selection-generating techniques.

Regardless of the supply, at $5 for about 30ml, I’m positive there are growers and health food shops laughing all the way to the bank. A call or text by the hospitalist to the PCP upon admission and at different selection points may well have enabled Mrs. Offered by the senior class, this award recognizes healthcare school faculty who excel in teaching.

At Cambridge, you study the medical sciences initial, ahead of finding out to apply that expertise to medical practice as a clinical student. I already have a loved ones member who is completing two years of studying in Waukesha, for that reason I would have a supporter.

With the development and development of pediatrics as a separate specialty devoted to the care of young children in the early 1900s, internal medicine continued its principal concentrate on adult patients. The Doctor of Medicine (MD) at Notre Dame is a four-year course undertaken by students in complete-time mode.…

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