This Is the Ultimate Gift for the Fitness Lover in Your Life

This article was produced in partnership with WHOOP. 



a close up of a cell phone: WHOOP Strap 3.0


© Courtesy Image
WHOOP Strap 3.0

If you’re shopping for the fitness lover in your life, the WHOOP strap really can’t be beat. Fitness is often a numbers game: How fast did you run? How far did you ride? How many pounds did you lift? What gets lost in pursuit of those numbers, though, is how well you recover. After all, that’s where the magic happens—when the body’s immune system repairs the micro tears in the muscles caused by exercise, which helps build them back stronger than before.

As recovery has become one of the fitness industry’s biggest buzzwords, technology has risen to meet the occasion. Wearables (the top fitness trend of 2020, according to an annual report by the American College of Sports Medicine) no longer track just steps and calories burned, but recovery time, energy reserves, and stress levels to provide a more holistic look at health and fitness.

And while many have started including recovery metrics, WHOOP has always been about optimizing recovery to make gains, perfect for someone who loves tracking their fitness but may need a reminder to chill when it counts. The fact that athletes like Michael Phelps and LeBron James wear the band, and it’s the official wearable of the NFL Players Association, well, that just makes it even more lust-worthy.

WHOOP measures three key metrics: strain, sleep, and recovery.



WHOOP Strap 3.0


© Provided by Men’s Journal
WHOOP Strap 3.0

Gallery: What Staring at Your Phone Every Day Does To Your Body (ETNT Health)

Strain translates to the cardiovascular load—tracked via 24/7 heart rate monitoring displayed on a scale of 0 to 20—achieved during a workout or over the course of the day. Exercise can be a good stressor, but piling on additional stress (whether it’s from overtraining, work, parenting, or just the state of the world) can tip someone into detrimental territory. Wherever that number falls at a given moment, the app’s Strain Coach provides personalized insight into how much additional strain is optimal for the body to take on, with goals that can be monitored in real-time during a workout.

On the flip side of strain is recovery. WHOOP quantifies recovery by tracking how the body adapts to strain via heart rate variability, resting heart rate, and sleep performance. Every day, the device provides a daily recovery score (on a scale of 0 to 100 percent) to clue the wearer in to how ready their body is to perform.

And then there’s sleep. Quality shuteye may be the single most important factor in exercise recovery, according to new research from the International Journal of Sports Medicine. Not only does the WHOOP strap track standard metrics like sleep stages, disturbances, time spent in bed, and how long falling asleep takes, it uses that personalized data to determine how much sleep someone needs each night to make up for missed shuteye or extra stress. The whole idea is to prevent the accrual of sleep debt,

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This Myanmar Doctor Gave Up a Life of Medicine and Is Now a Famous OnlyFans Model

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Nang Mwe San during a photoshoot. Photo: Aung Naing Soe

“Should I remove the cover-up?” Myanmar model Nang Mwe San asked during a recent shoot to advertise a male enhancement capsule promising bigger penises, harder erections, and a better sex life. 

The pink sarong was wrapped around her waist. She removed it, walked down to the shallow end of a pool, faced the camera, and smiled while posing for photographs.

myanmar-doctor-onlyfans-model-nang-mwe-san

“We’ve had other sexy models for ads … but Nang Mwe San’s name trumps all of them,” Moe Kyaw, the distributor of the pills, told VICE World News. “People are more interested in the products when she’s the one endorsing them.”

Little known outside her country, the 30-year-old trained physician is famous in Myanmar, where her story from doctor working in conflict zones to on-camera performer has been met with fascination, anger, and shock in a country where few women would talk so openly about a life in adult entertainment.

It started about two years ago, when she began posting provocative photos of herself on Facebook, where she now has 1.7 million followers. The photos gained an audience and caught the attention of the medical establishment, which took her license away in 2019, arguing that her images were inappropriate and “not in line with Myanmar culture.”

She found herself in a dilemma. Should she fight to get her license back and fulfill her parents’ wishes of being a doctor, or should she follow her other passion and become a full-time model? She soon resigned from her job working as a medical officer for an NGO.

myanmar-doctor-onlyfans-model-nang-mwe-san

“I enjoyed posting sexy photos on social media. The organization I was working with at that time didn’t like it,” she said.

“Revoking my medical license was a huge push for me to become a full-time model.” 

After shrugging off the public censure she doubled down and signed up to OnlyFans. The subscription-based content platform has made cult celebrities out of sex workers and adult performers around the world. But in conservative Myanmar, the career shift did not go over well. 

“Many criticized me including relatives, friends, and people on social media, but I didn’t really think about them,” Nang Mwe San said. “I do not even check the negative comments under the social media accounts.”

She is right not to. A quick perusal of her page shows sexually abusive comments and insults to her character.

Since her early days as a doctor, however, Nang Mwe San has always had something of an independent streak, wanting to go to places others might shy away from. She was drawn to medical work in conflict zones, and for a time worked for an NGO in Shan, Kachin, and Rakhine States, including in displaced camps for the Rohingya Muslim minority.

“While other fresh graduates were not willing to serve in the countryside and tried to get postings in cities like Yangon, I wanted to go to such places,” she said, adding that her parents were constantly worried about

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Qatar- Sidra Medicine saves life of young Kuwaiti boy with intractable epilepsy

(MENAFN – Gulf Times) * QF entity performs complex epilepsy surgery for first time on an international patient

Sidra Medicine, a Qatar Foundation (QF) entity, has performed a complex epilepsy surgery for the first time on an international patient.

Salem is a 10-year-old boy from Kuwait who used to suffer from at least 15-30 seizures a day. Each seizure could last from a few seconds to up to four minutes, increasing the danger to his physical health.

Salem was transferred to Sidra Medicine in Qatar, after his family in Kuwait sought a second expert opinion with the hospital’s renowned specialist treatment programme for children with intractable epilepsy.

Salem’s father, Dr Abdulrahman Abdullah, said: ‘Due to the nature of Salem’s epilepsy, we had to have someone monitoring him all the time as he would have an uncontrollable seizure any minute, with the added risk of hurting himself. And while he was on a good therapy programme, including anti-epileptic medications, in Kuwait, we had reached a stage where he was no longer responding to conventional treatment or medication.

‘Our decision to bring my son Salem to Sidra Medicine was based on several recommendations within the international and regional pediatric medical faculty. The specialist and advanced therapies that Sidra Medicine offers competes with centres of excellence that are in the US or Europe. My family and I are extremely impressed with the care our son received here, Salem’s father continued.

Dr Husam Kayyali, acting division chief of Neurology at Sidra Medicine, said: ‘Salem’s case was brought to our attention when his father reached out to our international office about saving his son’s life. Intractable epilepsy can be a heavy burden, especially on children as they need constant monitoring and care. Studies have shown that only 3-4% of patients with intractable epilepsy would respond to treatment with antiepileptic medications. Cutting-edge advanced therapies such as epilepsy surgery might be the only answer in such cases. After a thorough evaluation of Salem’s case at Sidra Medicine, we decided to proceed with epilepsy surgery.

Salem was cared for at Sidra Medicine by a multidisciplinary team of experts from neurology, neurophysiology, radiology, nuclear medicine, neuro-psychology and neurosurgery. He was also extensively supported by a wider team from occupational health, physical therapy, rehabilitative medicine and ophthalmology to ensure a comprehensive pre- and post-operative care programme, a press statement noted.

Sidra Medicine is “one of very few children’s hospitals in the Middle East” to have dedicated paediatric experts overseeing the entire spectrum of care for children with complex diseases or health challenges, including epilepsy, the statement points out.

‘Salem’s treatment programme at Sidra Medicine started with a thorough assessment and investigations at the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit with Video-Electroencephalographic monitoring and advanced neuroimaging such as high-resolution Brain MRI imaging and (positron emission tomography) PET scans. It was determined that Salem had suffered a stroke when he was a fetus inside his mother. This explained how he started getting refractory epileptic seizures when he turned five, which had progressively damaged the left

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Sidra Medicine saves life of young Kuwaiti boy with intractable epilepsy

* QF entity performs complex epilepsy surgery for first time on an international patient

Sidra Medicine, a Qatar Foundation (QF) entity, has performed a complex epilepsy surgery for the first time on an international patient.

Salem is a 10-year-old boy from Kuwait who used to suffer from at least 15-30 seizures a day. Each seizure could last from a few seconds to up to four minutes, increasing the danger to his physical health.

Salem was transferred to Sidra Medicine in Qatar, after his family in Kuwait sought a second expert opinion with the hospital’s renowned specialist treatment programme for children with intractable epilepsy.

Salem’s father, Dr Abdulrahman Abdullah, said: “Due to the nature of Salem’s epilepsy, we had to have someone monitoring him all the time as he would have an uncontrollable seizure any minute, with the added risk of hurting himself. And while he was on a good therapy programme, including anti-epileptic medications, in Kuwait, we had reached a stage where he was no longer responding to conventional treatment or medication.”

“Our decision to bring my son Salem to Sidra Medicine was based on several recommendations within the international and regional pediatric medical faculty. The specialist and advanced therapies that Sidra Medicine offers competes with centres of excellence that are in the US or Europe. My family and I are extremely impressed with the care our son received here,” Salem’s father continued.

Dr Husam Kayyali, acting division chief of Neurology at Sidra Medicine, said: “Salem’s case was brought to our attention when his father reached out to our international office about saving his son’s life. Intractable epilepsy can be a heavy burden, especially on children as they need constant monitoring and care. Studies have shown that only 3-4% of patients with intractable epilepsy would respond to treatment with antiepileptic medications. Cutting-edge advanced therapies such as epilepsy surgery might be the only answer in such cases. After a thorough evaluation of Salem’s case at Sidra Medicine, we decided to proceed with epilepsy surgery.”

Salem was cared for at Sidra Medicine by a multidisciplinary team of experts from neurology, neurophysiology, radiology, nuclear medicine, neuro-psychology and neurosurgery. He was also extensively supported by a wider team from occupational health, physical therapy, rehabilitative medicine and ophthalmology to ensure a comprehensive pre- and post-operative care programme, a press statement noted.

Sidra Medicine is “one of very few children’s hospitals in the Middle East” to have dedicated paediatric experts overseeing the entire spectrum of care for children with complex diseases or health challenges, including epilepsy, the statement points out.

“Salem’s treatment programme at Sidra Medicine started with a thorough assessment and investigations at the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit with Video-Electroencephalographic monitoring and advanced neuroimaging such as high-resolution Brain MRI imaging and (positron emission tomography) PET scans. It was determined that Salem had suffered a stroke when he was a fetus inside his mother. This explained how he started getting refractory epileptic seizures when he turned five, which had progressively damaged the left side of his brain,”

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Science and medicine were part of my life | Times Online

Dinner table chats with her scientist-parents and hospital ward rounds with her Puncha, these were what inspired her, says Dr. Maheshi N. Ramasamy, Principal Investigator for the Oxford COVID-19 Vaccine Trial, in this interview with Kumudini Hettiarachchi

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Totally relaxed, she comes on Zoom on Wednesday – at the appointed hour of 12 Greenwich Meantime Time (GMT) in Oxford, England, and 5.30 p.m. in Sri Lanka.

No one would imagine that pretty Dr. Maheshi N. Ramasamy, who is quick to smile and chats leisurely, has been having a “crazy” time since the COVID-19 pandemic hit the world.

Dr. Ramasamy delivering a lecture on vaccines at the International Medical Conference of the Sri Lanka Medical Association (SLMA) last year in Colombo

For, 43-year-old Dr. Ramasamy is the Principal Investigator for the Oxford COVID-19 Vaccine Trial. Dubbing these  “exciting” times, she promptly reiterates that the very promising potential vaccine in the Oxford University/AstraZeneca pipeline is “very much a product of teamwork”. The Oxford vaccine will be manufactured by the British pharmaceutical company, AstraZeneca which has made a commitment to making the vaccine on a non-profit basis throughout the pandemic so that it could be distributed globally.

As the Oxford Vaccine Group hopes to put out another strong research paper on their vaccine trials in a week, the Sunday Times looks at the life of this eminent Sri Lankan who loves to come back to her motherland to spend time with family, mainly her four “lovely” cousins who are like her siblings and her ‘Puncha’ (mother’s sister) who is well-known Consultant Physician Dr. Anula Wijesundere.

Out of the ordinary has been only-child Maheshi’s childhood, as her scientist-parents Prof. Ranjan Ramasamy and Prof. Manthri Samaranayake Ramasamy crisscrossed the globe. Born in Colombo, her early years had been spent in Saudi Arabia and Kenya, then back in Sri Lanka and onto California, United States of America, when the country was gripped by communal violence in 1983, then to Brisbane in Australia and finally back to Colombo in 1989.

Dr. Ramasamy says that her mother and aunt were both proud stalwarts and Head Girls of Visakha Vidyalaya, but she was there only briefly, just 10 months, as soon as she began her formal school education. When she returned from Brisbane, she joined Stafford International School – as her “Sinhala was not good enough” to attend Visakha – and did both her OLs and ALs from there. She was awarded the Felix R. de Zoysa Memorial Academic Scholarship and was also the Head Prefect at Stafford International.

Dr. Maheshi Ramasamy in her Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

“I had a great time at Stafford, with its wonderful teachers and amazing Principal Noreen Welikala,” she says, while her family in Colombo was also very close. She and her cousins would be dropped off at school by her aunt in the mornings and they would all go to their grandparents’ home for lunch after school. Family dinners were also a regular occurrence, usually ending on a high note

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Precision medicine key to preventing disease developing later in life, Singapore News & Top Stories

SINGAPORE – An individual’s genes can determine the amount of risk he has of developing life-threatening conditions such as heart disease and in turn allows for early intervention.

This is central to the precision medicine programme here, said Professor Tan Chorh Chuan, the chief health scientist from the Ministry of Health and executive director at the Healthcare Transformation Office.

Prof Tan told a webinar on Wednesday (Nov 25) that the programme looks at the genome sequences of participants to help determine the cumulative risks of different diseases based on their genes.

This can be particularly useful for some complaints like premature heart disease, added Prof Tan, who was joined on the webinar panel by Prudential chief executive Dennis Tan and Health Promotion Board (HPB) CEO Zee Yoong Kang.

The event, which covered a broad range of health topics from diabetes and vaccines to strategies on how to stay healthy, is part of The Straits Times Reset 2021 webinar series. It was sponsored by Prudential and moderated by ST senior health correspondent Salma Khalik.

Prof Tan told the webinar that a condition known as familial hypercholesterolemia is caused when a person has a gene that results in high cholesterol levels at a much younger age. If that gene is present, the individual will have up to 20 times higher risk of heart disease – and at an earlier age.

“And then if we identify somebody, we can also test the family. So these preventive strategies will be part of precision health,” he added.

The HPB is working to make use of the clinical, behavioural and digital data as well as genetic data – with patient consent – to identify those at higher risk to allow for early intervention.

Prudential’s Mr Tan said Singaporeans need not be worried about being part of the programme or be concerned if they find out their genome sequences. Having “bad” genes will not make it harder for them to secure insurance policies, he assured.

Privacy is really important, Mr Tan said, adding that “we (Prudential) are very, very careful about such things”.

He said individuals ultimately have to take charge of their own health and should find out more. He said: “Preventive healthcare is all about them being in the driver’s seat, and going through the whole process of early detection, health screening and all.

“So I think as insurers, we will definitely support them.”

Ms Khalik noted that if a person learns that he is at a high risk of getting a certain disease, it will give him the time and opportunity to act before the ailment takes hold.

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ZYUS Life Sciences Strengthens Leadership in Evidence-Based Medicine with Appointment of Clinical Advisory Committee

SASKATOON, Saskatchewan–(BUSINESS WIRE)–ZYUS Life Sciences Inc. (“ZYUS”), a Canadian life sciences company leading scientific research and development in phyto-therapeutics, is pleased to announce the formation of a Clinical Advisory Committee to provide strategic advice and guidance on ZYUS’ clinical trial programs. Five committee members have been appointed to the Clinical Advisory Committee, adding additional medical, scientific, and clinical expertise to its experienced leadership team. This announcement is an important step in ZYUS’ integrated clinical development program and supports the company’s ambitions to pioneer the next generation of life sciences through an evidence-based approach.

Chaired by ZYUS’ Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Lionel Marks de Chabris, a leading expert in chronic pain management and addictions medicine, the ZYUS Clinical Advisory Committee includes four initial committee members including Dr. Mary Lynch, Dr. David J. Shulkin, Dr. Cedric Francois and Dr. Alice Zwerling. As ZYUS scales its clinical trial programs, the Clinical Advisory Committee will work closely with the research team to provide input and guidance on clinical development strategies and evaluate the clinical trial progress.

Each of the named Clinical Advisory Committee members bring remarkable medical leadership and expertise to their advisory roles. Dr. Mary Lynch ranks among North America’s leading experts in pain management. She is a Professor in the Departments of Anesthesiology, Pain Management and Perioperative Medicine, Psychiatry and Pharmacology in the Faculty of Medicine at Dalhousie University. In addition to being the founding director of the Canadian Consortium for the Investigation of Cannabinoids, Dr. Lynch co-chairs the Canadian Pain Strategy and is a member of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons Working Group on Pain Management. Her expertise in pain management is directly aligned with ZYUS’ research into the potential of phyto-therapeutics to manage chronic and neuropathic pain, and Dr. Lynch’s scientific research and thought-leadership in this space will provide valuable guidance to ZYUS’ clinical approach.

Providing cross-border expertise and widely respected medical leadership, Dr. David J. Shulkin will bring his decades of experience leading some of North America’s largest and most sophisticated medical networks to the ZYUS Clinical Advisory Committee. Dr. Shulkin previously served as the ninth Secretary of the US Department of Veterans Affairs and prior to holding that role, was appointed Under Secretary for Health by President Obama and confirmed unanimously by the U.S. Senate. In his role as Secretary of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, he represented 21 million American veterans and was responsible for the country’s largest integrated health care system with over 1,200 sites of care. In addition to his roles in the public sector, Dr. Shulkin has served as the chief executive of multiple hospitals and health systems, and has been named as one of the “One Hundred Most Influential People in American Healthcare” by Modern Healthcare. Dr. Shulkin’s experience as a physician, hospital CEO and Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs provides unique insights into the medical, societal and political implications of ZYUS’ clinical trial programs.

The co-founder and Chief Executive Officer and President of Apellis Pharmaceuticals,

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Patriots got a taste of the QB high life from Deshaun Watson and the Texans

The Patriots spent nearly two decades living the high life in the high-rent quarterback district of the NFL, the beneficiaries of an elite, difference-making passer who tipped the balance of close games in their favor. They no longer reside in that well-to-do NFL neighborhood without Tom Brady, but they got a reminder of what it looks like on Sunday in a demoralizing 27-20 loss to Deshaun Watson and the Houston Texans. Watson accounted for 380 of the Texans’ 399 yards of total offense and all three of Houston’s touchdowns. “He’s a really good quarterback and he had a really good day today,” said Patriots coach Bill Belichick. “All the yards they gained weren’t in the passing game either. It was him running or him throwing. It was the entire offense.”The Patriots had no answer for No. 4 as their record dropped to 4-6, and the path to the playoffs narrowed to claustrophobic dimensions. Here are five Takeaways from the Patriots’ squandered chance at reaching .500 deep in the heart of Texas: 1. Not built for speed — The good news was that quarterback Cam Newton played well and finally threw a touchdown pass to a wide receiver, connecting with Damiere Byrd (six catches for a career-high 132 yards) on a 42-yard strike. It only took nine games. The bad news: It’s painfully obvious that the Patriots’ glacial offense is not built to play from behind. A 21-10 halftime deficit at NRG Stadium felt more insurmountable than the 28-3 deficit they faced in the same building in Super Bowl LI against the Atlanta Falcons. That’s because the Patriots’ passing attack runs at dial-up modem speed with a lot of safe and sideways throws for Newton. The Patriots’ deliberate approach shortens the game with lengthy drives. That’s ideal when you have a lead like the Patriots’ upset of Baltimore. It’s far less desirable when you’re playing from behind. The Patriots’ death knell was their own doing. Trailing 24-17, they uncorked a 16-play, 65-yard, 9-minute and 25-second drive that took longer than a Christopher Nolan movie to reach its conclusion — a field goal. The Patriots possessed the ball for 10 minutes and 30 seconds of the fourth quarter and scored 3 points.The Patriots actually generated explosive plays on Sunday — five pass plays of 20 yards or more — but they still don’t do it with enough regularity or ease. Taking a closer look, one of those plays was a season-long 52-yarder to Ryan Izzo, a gratuitous Fail Mary catch on the game’s final play. Another one came on a screen pass to James White for 34 yards. Another was manufactured with smoke and mirrors — a double pass in which Newton passed up an open Byrd deep for a 20-yard gain to Jakobi Meyers. The Patriots remain too methodical and mechanical for their own good.“With a defense that we played today with such a strong front, front seven, we just got to make sure that we sustain drives, keep them out …

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Home Fitness Innovator FORME Life Launches Nationwide Retail Rollout With Westfield Shopping Centers

Designed by Yves Béhar, the elegant at-home wellness solution curates workouts based on users’ ability, goals, and lifestyle. To suit a range of personal preferences, the retail stores will display two distinct offerings: Studio, a mirrored display that transforms to offer live and on-demand content, and Studio Lift, which includes resistance training equipment that conveniently tucks away when not in use.

This retail launch marks the first time customers will be able to purchase FORME Life in person, having garnered significant interest since announcing pre-orders in May of this year. Customers will now be able to experience the stylish equipment and world class content before placing an order. The stores and kiosks will feature both the Studio and Studio Lift, empowering customers to select the best option for their lifestyle. Flagship locations will measure approximately 1,000 square feet and Kiosks will be around 400 square feet, both featuring clean lines and minimalist design to complement FORME Life’s aesthetic. In addition, retail stores will feature an exclusive fragrance partnership with Virtuvi and custom artwork by Anoushka Mirchandani.

“We are delighted to welcome FORME Life to some of our most affluent centers across the country,” said Colin Shaughnessy, EVP, US leasing. “Their new-to-market stores are an exciting addition to our lineup of wellness boutiques, fitness offerings, and cutting-edge technologies that aim to revolutionize the modern shopping experience. Now, more than ever, home fitness is an important category as our guests look to access workouts and build a fitness routine from the comfort of their own home.”

“We are so excited to see FORME Life out in the world and have been waiting for this since we began to create our Studios. We love that people can finally experience what we believe to be the very best in home fitness. For this reason, Westfield Shopping Centers have purposefully placed FORME Life within their luxury lifestyle stores and experiences.” – Trent Ward, Founder and CEO

About FORME Life

Designed by Yves Béhar, FORME Life delivers an unparalleled at-home fitness experience. The Studios uniquely transform to host a variety of workouts and activities, returning to an elegant, full-length mirror when not in use. What’s more, an ultra-high definition touch-screen display is the closest thing to a one-on-one interactive experience with a personal trainer.

To suit a range of user preferences, FORME Life offers two distinct models: Studio ($2495 or as little as $69/month for 36 months) and Studio Lift ($4495 or as little as $125/month for 36 months), which includes resistance training equipment that uniquely tucks away when not in use. FORME Life’s ever-evolving original content can be experienced by everyone in the household for a $39/month multi-user membership.

To learn more, please visit formelife.com and on Instagram.

Media Contact
Gabrielle Perez 
Jack Taylor PR 
[email protected]

SOURCE FORME Life

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On the front lines of COVID, nurses confront life and death

EL PASO, Texas (AP) — A fire engine wailed its siren up Cotton Avenue and disappeared behind the El Paso Long Term Acute Care hospital.

A man at the front desk held his hand up to a visitor: “Please wait outside. A COVID patient is being transferred.”

Upstairs on the third floor, in an office outside the COVID-19 wing, nurse Valerie Scott updated a co-worker on the patient being rushed by the fire department to an emergency room. She wore black scrubs and spoke from behind a black surgical mask.

The supplemental oxygen wasn’t helping. The man couldn’t breathe.


“I don’t think he is coming back,” she said, worried.

725 people have died of COVID-19 in El Paso since March 23 — the day the county reported the first death tied to the novel coronavirus, according to El Paso Times. Grandparents, parents, siblings and one teenager have died; retired people, working people and teachers have died. Nurses have died.

The bed belonging to the man who left Scott’s hospital in distress would be occupied again that evening. The waitlist for her 15 dedicated COVID-19 beds had swelled overnight from 22 to 32 patients.

Across the city, more than 1,000 people per day are testing positive and the city’s major hospitals are overrun with severely ill and dying El Pasoans. Hundreds of health care workers have flown into El Paso to pick up shifts from exhausted doctors and nurses and to staff tent hospitals erected in parking lots. The refrigerators of six morgue trailers hummed, keeping the bodies cold.

The El Paso Long Term Acute Care hospital, physician-owned and licensed for 33 beds, is pitching in as it can.

“They tried to talk to the family,” Scott told her co-worker, who manages the relationship with acute-care hospitals, about the COVID-19 patient transferred out. “Basically, at this point, it would be better to give him comfort measures… Here there was nothing more we could do.”

She had reason to worry: When doctors have ordered an emergency room transfer of a COVID-19 patient, it meant things had taken a turn for the worse and the patient rarely survived.

The co-worker cursed under her breath.

In the city outside, beyond the hospital’s pale pink stucco walls, El Pasoans went about their day, most in face masks but with few other precautions. People shopped at Target and Walmart and shopping centers. Bars-turned-restaurants kept dining rooms open to guests. A fight between city and county leaders and businesses over restrictions on daily life lumbered through the court system.

The relentless war against a deadly, invisible enemy was out of sight to all but those working its front lines.

The El Paso Long Term Acute Care hospital faces southeast, soaking up morning light, built as it was in 1925 for tuberculosis patients when sunlight was the only cure for another disease that eats away at the lungs and suffocates those who succumb to it.

The COVID-19 wing occupies half of the hospital’s third floor.

Inside, the narrow

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