FITNESS FILES: Yoga classes go back online with latest round of restrictions

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As far as Schmidt knows, there has not been a single case of transmission from her studio, so the latest rounds of restrictions did come as somewhat of a surprise.

All team sports, fitness classes and training sessions have been prohibited. Prior to the latest restrictions, yoga studios were adhering to stringent health guidelines.

“We were not touching each other, the instructors weren’t going around and doing any hands-on, and they were wearing a mask the whole time,” Schmidt said. “They’re safe and people are social distanced. I can understand some points because of the sizing, we’re not outdoors, but I was surprised, because I think most members of the health community are taking it seriously, they don’t want to be shutdown.

“The members and the instructors running it are trying to be extra cautious, because the instructors want to keep their jobs and the members don’t want to lose this, so people have been really good about staying away if they have a scratchy throat or something and the members had been quite responsible.”

Email: [email protected]

On Twitter: @DerekVanDiest

ASK A TRAINER

CSEP-CPT fitness and lifestyle consultant Deanna Harder offers health advice and a home workout of the week. This is for educational purposes only and a physician should always be consulted before beginning any fitness program.

Deanna Harder, is a CSEP (Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology) certified personal trainer in Edmonton.

This week, the Ask A Trainer question was submitted by Kara:

“Deanna, I would like to begin a home workout program. I finally have time to commit to exercising now that I am working from home due to the pandemic. The only thing is I am pregnant. What do I need to know about exercising in my first trimester?”

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Need a Fitness Tracker? The Latest Fitbit is Marked Down to Just $99 Right Now

If you’ve been looking to add a solid fitness tracker to your daily routine, you’ll want to take advantage of this surprise Fitbit deal, which gets you the all-new Fitbit Charge 4 for just $99. That’s a massive $50 off its regular price of $149.95 and the first time the best-selling activity tracker has been discounted since it came out this spring (the same deal is also available on Amazon here).

Fitbit Charge 4 Fitness Tracker, 99.95, available at Fitbit

For under $100, you get one of the best fitness watches on the market, with a step tracker, sleep tracker, calorie tracker, heart rate monitor, and more. The Charge 4 has built-in GPS to help set your pace and track your distance during a run or hike. The device is also water-resistant up to 50 meters, making it great for swimmers and triathletes.

Track your workouts, set goals to stay active, and review your “sleep score” to see how well you stay asleep at night. All the stats are displayed on the easy-to-see screen, or can be tracked via the Fitbit app.

Pair the Charge 4 with a music streaming service to play your favorite tracks and playlists. Use “Fitbit Pay” to make purchases with a single tap. You can also set up your Fitbit to get call and text notifications (this isn’t a smartwatch so you’ll still need to use your phone to respond to messages).

The Charge 4 features the same, sleek design and lightweight strap as previous models. This one gets you a powerful battery that lasts up to seven days.

Regularly $149.95, Fitbit has its newest fitness tracker marked down to just $99. This deal includes the Fitbit, a watchband, charger and a 90-day free trial of Fitbit Premium. Like all Amazon deals, this is a limited-time offer so we recommend picking up the new Fitbit while the deal is still active. See full details here.

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No-frills, at-home virtual workouts can get fitness done | Latest Headlines

Fitness centers have an ample supply of dumbbells, free weights and circuit training equipment – as well as a far greater social outlet – Black said, but in a pinch, “you’re basically doing the same major movements you would at home, but you have a cable machine versus you’re just doing pushups.”

Kupferman said he lost 10 pounds in three months when the pandemic stopped his travel and he started eating healthier at home. He regained 6 pounds of mostly muscle and feels better overall.

“I’ve done that by spending less time running, more time in the pool and more time in strength training with Connor,” he said.

Despite less time jogging the streets of his neighborhood, he also is running 8-minute miles, nearly two minutes faster than before the pandemic.

Kupferman is hardly alone when it comes to online exercise training.

Michael Antkowiak, manager of G&G Fitness Equipment stores in Amherst and Orchard Park, said business has doubled since the pandemic began. He has since doubled his staff, to six.

Customers have paid $1,500 to $7,000 for treadmills, functional trainers and home gyms, as well as another $100 to $400 for assembly and installation.

“Many people are saying, ‘We don’t even want to even go back after the vaccine comes out or the whole pandemic ends. We’re invested on staying at home and working out,” Antkowiak said.

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SPORTS MEDICINE: Take heart from latest COVID-19-related news | John Doherty

Dr. Sean Swearingen is a cardiologist with Community Care Network in Munster, who works with the athletic department at Purdue Northwest. He explained what “mild” symptoms of COVID-19 are and what they are not.

“It is symptoms that are not in any way inhibiting their day-to-day function and they are for less than 10 days,” he said, “then that is what falls in the category of mild symptoms and they don’t need any further cardiac workup. From the patients I have (had tested), they haven’t had to be hospitalized but they have had relatively significant symptoms where they have been out of commission for several days, haven’t been able to attend their online classes (because) they’ve been so fatigued. To me, I would consider that moderate symptoms.”

Symptomatic or not, cardiac tested or not, all athletes who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 need to be cautious as they return to sport, according to Swearingen.

While I questioned the Big Ten’s 21-day minimum in comparison to the ACC’s 10-day minimum in this space earlier this month, Swearingen finds it more than reasonable.

“The 21-day Big Ten protocol (allows) for a week-long ramp period in the final week,” he explained. “I am a big supporter of this — a gradual monitored increase in activity allows for another layer of safety so that players can be monitored for signs and symptoms before they are putting themselves at risk in full-on competition. The monitored physical activity is just as important as the testing itself and it seems like a lot of people are ignoring that final part in the guideline, the gradual increase in activity.”

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The Latest: Cases Climb, Protests Break Out in Spain | World News

MADRID — Spain’s total number of COVID-19 infections has climbed to more than 1,240,000, but the government said Monday it won’t be introducing stricter lockdown conditions for now.

Over the weekend, a spate of violent protests in a dozen cities were held in response to a nightly curfew introduced last week in Spain. Mostly young protesters set fire to vehicles and trash cans, blocked roads and threw objects at riot police.

Spain’s Minister for Inclusion, Social Security and Migration, José Luis Escrivá told Antena 3 television Monday that “this kind of behavior is to be expected” as people grow weary of restrictions against the spread of COVID-19.

The Health Ministry reported just over 55,000 new cases in Spain since it last published official figures on Friday. More than 36,000 people have died in Spain since the pandemic began.

Asturias, a region on the north coast, asked the national government to order people in the province to stay at home for two weeks.

The Health Ministry refused, saying it is waiting to see the results of the central government’s latest restrictions, introduced last week. A strict lockdown from March to June brought down the number of cases but hit the economy hard.

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— America stands at a crossroads the day before Election Day, facing a stark choice between candidates in the midst of historic pandemic

— U.S. hospitals are scrambling to hire more nurses as the coronavirus pandemic surges, leading to stiff competition and increased costs.

— Germany kicks off a partial lockdown, as several European countries tighten restrictions this week

— The BBC says Britain’s Prince William had the virus in April, around the same time as his father Prince Charles

— Follow AP’s coronavirus pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

GENEVA — A top World Health Organization scientist focusing on the coronavirus response says there has been no transmission or clusters at the agency’s Geneva headquarters.

Maria Van Kerkhove, the WHO’s technical lead on the COVID-19 pandemic, made the comments to reporters after the U.N. agency’s chief, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, announced that he was starting a self-quarantine after coming into contact with a person who tested positive for the virus.

“I am well and without symptoms, but will self quarantine in the coming days in line with WHO protocols,” Tedros said via video conference from his home during a regular WHO news conference on Monday.

Van Kerkhove said the agency was tracking all cases among staff and carrying out contact tracing to ensure that transmission wasn’t taking place at its Geneva headquarters.

“We haven’t had any transmission take place on the premises, and we have no clusters on the premises,” she said. “But it is something that we’re monitoring every day.”

O’FALLAN, Mo. — Missouri hospital leaders are raising alarms about bed capacity as coronavirus cases continue to spike, with some urging Gov. Mike Parson to issue a statewide mask mandate.

Meanwhile, an eastern

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Latest information and helpful resources as coronavirus impacts North Carolina

Here you can get the latest information on the coronavirus, or COVID-19, in North Carolina and surrounding region, and resources to be prepared and keep your family safe.



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What’s New — Week of Oct. 25:

  • More than 9.0 million people in the country have been infected with the virus and more than 230,000 people have died, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.
  • The latest surge of COVID-19 infections has brought the seven-day average of new daily cases to heights not seen since the pandemic began. The seven-day average of new cases hit 68,767 on Sunday, topping the previous peak of 67,293 reported on July 22. The two highest single days of new cases were Friday and Saturday, with more than 83,000 new cases added each day.
  • The economic fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic is driving up food insecurity across America. 54 million Americans are going hungry. Here is how you can get help if you are facing food insecurity today.
  • Immunity to COVID-19 infection lingers for at least five months, researchers reported — and probably longer than that.
  • As voters get ready to head to the polls on Election Day, many will do something they have never done before: put on a mask to go vote. Here are coronavirus guidelines for in-person voting.
  • Gov. Roy Cooper issued Executive Order No. 171 Wednesday to strengthen eviction protections and keep more North Carolinians in their homes.
  • Millions of Americans who have lost health insurance in an economy shaken by the coronavirus can sign up for taxpayer-subsidized coverage starting Sunday.

North Carolina Numbers:

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services has not updated its coronavirus numbers for Friday because of a technical delay, it reported. It is working to provide an update as soon as possible, which is when this article will be updated.

  • There have been 274,635 cases and 4,378 deaths in the state as of Saturday
  • There are currently 1,184 people hospitalized
  • The state has completed 4,043,698 tests
  • 6.1% of tests returned positive, with 2,805 new cases reported Saturday
    • Dr. Mandy Cohen, secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, said the goal for this benchmark is 5%.

Piedmont Triad County Numbers:

  • Alamance County has 5,511 positive cases, 89 deaths
  • Alleghany County has 311 positive cases, 2 deaths
  • Caswell County has 640 positive cases, 5 deaths
  • Davidson County has 3,836 positive cases, 44 deaths
  • Davie County has 786 positive cases, 11 deaths
  • Forsyth County has 9,121 positive cases, 121 deaths
  • Guilford County has 11,877 positive cases, 210 deaths
  • Montgomery County has 1,208 positive cases, 40 deaths
  • Randolph County has 3,921 positive cases, 64 deaths
  • Rockingham County has 2,125 positive cases, 26 deaths
  • Stokes County has 710 positive cases, 12 deaths
  • Surry County has 1,961 positive cases, 33 deaths
  • Wilkes County has 1,846 positive cases, 38 deaths
  • Yadkin County has 1,084 positive cases,
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Organised ‘overkill’: China shows off rapid lockdown system after latest outbreak

BEIJING (Reuters) – Days after a 17-year-old girl tested positive for COVID-19 in a remote part of western China last week, health authorities said they had tested over 4.7 million people in the region.

FILE PHOTO: Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin speaks during a news conference in Beijing, China July 27, 2020. REUTERS/Tingshu Wang

China’s strict formula of immediate lockdowns and mass testing even at the first signs of infection has been vital to its success in controlling the disease, allowing its economy to quickly recover from the crisis, officials say.

The highly orchestrated strategy – described as “overkill” even by its own proponents – is unique among major economies at a time when Europe and the United States are facing a massive surge of new cases and often chaotic policies.

At the time the girl was diagnosed, the Kashgar region of Xinjiang had reported no new cases for almost 70 days.

“China has taken the most comprehensive, strictest and most thorough control and prevention measures since the COVID-19 pandemic started,” foreign ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin said on Wednesday.

“The facts show China’s measures are effective.”

Key to the programme are factors unique to China, including the Communist Party’s tight grip on all aspects of society.

Authorities have unimpeded access to personal information as part of an expansive surveillance network, which has played a major role in tracing infections.

The government has also quickly enlisted the help of businesses, which are churning out tens of millions of test kits, and tightly controls their pricing and distribution, issues which have severely set back efforts to contain the disease in other countries.

China has reported just 2,382 cases since June. By contrast, Germany and France are set to follow Italy and Spain back into partial lockdowns, as Europe reported a record 230,000 cases in one day earlier this week, while U.S. cases are set to hit 9 million soon.

MASS TESTINGS

In August, Beijing ordered all major hospitals in the country to offer testing, and said there should be one urban testing base constructed for every million residents, with the capacity to scale up to 30,000 tests a day in a local outbreak.

Regions are also required to share resources, in sharp contrast to the early days of the outbreak, when several cities were accused of stealing equipment from each other.

The system, like all Chinese Communist blueprints, is highly structured around specific targets; testing teams should be able to complete a campaign within seven days.

Earlier this month, almost 11 million test results were delivered in around five days in the eastern port city of Qingdao. In Wuhan, the initial epicentre of the pandemic, over 9 million samples were taken over 10 days in May.

The mass testings are mandatory. Some are held in outdoor sporting venues and city parks, with hundreds of people lining up.

PUTTING PEOPLE AT EASE

Epidemiologists have called into question the efficacy of the mass testing events, noting some patients require multiple tests over time

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Santa Cruz County Enters Orange Tier; Latest COVID-19 Case Count

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY, CA — More services can now increase indoor capacity after Santa Cruz County moved into the less-restrictive orange tier Monday.

The orange tier is the second-lowest tier in the state four-tiered, color-coded risk system and indicates a “moderate” COVID-19 risk level. Santa Cruz County is seeing reduced COVID-19 transmission levels, but cases are expected to increase into the winter months, the county said in a statement. Nationally, cases have already begun to rise.

The news came hours after county officials announced plans to ramp up testing for the coronavirus and said that an outbreak at a Watsonville skilled nursing facility appears to have subsided.

The following reopenings are now allowed in Santa Cruz County, with safety restrictions:

  • Restaurants (half-capacity indoors)

  • Worship houses (half-capacity indoors)

  • Gyms and fitness centers (25 percent capacity or 100 people indoors; whichever is fewer)

  • Movie theaters (half-capacity indoors)

  • Museums (half-capacity indoors)

  • Retail (full capacity indoors)

  • Bars, breweries and distilleries (outdoor operations only)

  • Wineries (25 percent capacity or 100 people indoors; whichever is fewer)

  • Amusement parks (outdoors only and 25 percent capacity or 100 people; whichever is fewer)

  • Family entertainment Centers (25 percent capacity)

  • Non-essential Offices (indoors with modifications)

  • Live-audience sports (outdoors, regional visitors only; 20 percent capacity)

Residents are asked to continue wearing face coverings, practicing social distancing, staying home when sick and avoiding large group gatherings.

County Health Officer Dr. Gail Newel said during a Tuesday morning press conference that an outbreak at Watsonville Post Acute Center — one of seven skilled nursing facilities in the county — appears to have stabilized. No patients are currently infected and there have been no recent new infections, she said.

There were 74 residents of the center when the outbreak first began in mid-September, and 50 residents and 21 staff tested positive for COVID-19, she said. Fifteen deaths have been linked to the outbreak.

Newel said the center has followed all precautions and remained in consultation with county and state officials. The center is not accepting new patients.

“It’s a tragedy, but its probably unavoidable that this happened,” she said.

Mimi Hall, county Health Services Agency Director, announced plans to expand testing capacity in Santa Cruz County. Widespread testing is key to staying in a lesser tier, she said.

The county is seeking to add a testing site in Mid- to North County that can provide 165 tests per day, she said. Officials have also put in a request to the state health department officials to provide resources that would allow the county to double testing capacity at a Watsonville site and provide 330 tests there per day, for four days.

The University of California, Santa Cruz lab has expanded its efforts to regularly test on-campus students and staff, Hall said. The university continues to serve as a backup lab for the county and health system partners.

Newel urged residents to seek COVID-19 testing as soon as they start noticing associated symptoms and get a flu shot. People are more susceptible to COVID-19

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The Latest: China Says Latest Outbreak Appears Contained | World News

BEIJING — Officials in the northwestern China region of Xinjiang say they believe they have contained the country’s latest coronavirus outbreak.

Xinjiang reported 23 new confirmed cases Thursday, all involving people who had initially tested positive but displayed no symptoms. It was the second consecutive day in which newly confirmed cases emerged entirely among such people.

Officials say that development appears to show new infections have been curbed in Kashgar prefecture, where the outbreak appeared Saturday. They say all the cases seem to be linked to a garment factory that employs 252 people and has since being sealed off.

More than 4.7 million people in Kashgar have been tested for the virus.

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— US plans to buy initial antibody doses from Eli Lilly

— Task force member Giroir: Cases, hospitalizations, deaths up in US – not just testing

— President Emmanuel Macron announces second national lockdown in France starting Friday. German officials agreed four-week partial lockdown.

— Belgium and Czech Republic top Europe’s highest number of coronavirus cases per 100,000 citizens, ahead of hotbeds France and Spain.

— Love blossoms amid pandemic for two TikTok creators in Los Angeles, using goofy dance videos, heartfelt vlogs and affirmations.

— Follow AP’s coronavirus pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Officials in Anchorage, Alaska, say the city is on a “dangerous path” as coronavirus cases rise and are urging people to avoid gatherings and follow orders to wear masks in public.

Acting Mayor Austin Quinn-Davidson says she has been meeting with business leaders, health officials and others to make decisions that protect health but also impose minimal restrictions so businesses can stay open.

The mayor says that “none of us wants another hunker-down” order.

The city’s health director says that after months of dealing with the pandemic, some people may have let down their guard. She says people should stay home except to get food, exercise outside or go to work. She says it is important to wear masks and social distance in public and to avoid contact with those at higher risk for severe illness.

MINNEAPOLIS — Minnesota health officials are warning against traditional Halloween festivities amid the recent rise in coronavirus cases statewide.

Officials say that instead of traditional trick-or-treating and indoor haunted houses, people should look to lower risk activities like carving pumpkins and decorating homes or holding virtual gatherings.

he state’s infectious diseases director said Wednesday that warmer weather this weekend may encourage outdoor gatherings, but cautioned against disregarding health guidelines with virus infections rising steadily.

Officials reported 1,916 new coronavirus cases and 19 new COVID-19 deaths. Daily case counts statewide have exceeded 2,000 three times in the past two weeks, and the state has reported more than 1,000 new daily cases for the last 21 days.

DES MOINES, Iowa — Medical professionals in Iowa are expressing concerns that a surge in coronavirus infections and hospitalizations could overwhelm medical facilities if

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Louisiana coronavirus: 503 more cases, 10 more deaths reported Wednesday; see latest data | Coronavirus

The Louisiana Department of Health reported 503 more coronavirus cases and 10 more deaths in its noon update Wednesday.

The number of hospitalizations increased by 13, and the number of patients in need of ventilators decreased by 11.

These are another few key statewide statistics as of Wednesday:

— Total cases: 181,443

— Total deaths: 5,676

— Currently hospitalized: 613

— Currently on ventilators: 80

— Presumed recovered: 168,634 as of Oct. 26 (updated weekly)

— Probable cases: 4,379 as of Oct. 28 (updated weekly)

Note: The Advocate and The Times-Picayune staff calculates daily case count increases based on the difference between today’s total and yesterday’s total of confirmed coronavirus cases. The Louisiana Department of Health releases a daily case count on Twitter based on the deletion of duplicate cases. That case count can be different than the one listed here.

You can view more graphs and charts breaking down the data by clicking here.

Louisiana began reopening for Phase 1 on May 15-16 then moved to Phase 2 on June 5. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards extended Louisiana’s Phase 2 restrictions twice in August before moving the state to Phase 3 on Sept. 11.

This is a developing story. More details and analysis to come.

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