Atalanta v Liverpool: Joel Matip and Naby Keita face late fitness tests before Champions League tie

Liverpool
Liverpool have won 1-0 away at Ajax and 2-0 at home against FC Midtjylland in the Champions League this season

Defender Joel Matip and midfielder Naby Keita face late fitness tests before Liverpool’s Champions League game at Atalanta on Tuesday (20:00 GMT).

The pair trained on Sunday, but midfielder Thiago Alcantara was absent as he recovers from a knee injury.

“We have to wait until the medical department gives us a green, orange or red light,” said manager Jurgen Klopp.

Liverpool have won both of their Champions League games this season and are top of Group D.

Meanwhile, Atalanta, who reached the quarter-finals of the 2019-20 competition, have picked up four points from their opening two matches and are second.

This will be Liverpool’s first European match against the Italian side and Klopp is expecting a tough game.

“They obviously have a really good atmosphere, a good mood and are a proper fighting unit,” said the German.

“They are very well organised; play their system with 100% conviction, they know exactly what everybody has to do.

“I know how good they are. I actually enjoyed the analysis, I enjoyed watching them because it’s really interesting.”

Premier League leaders Liverpool will be playing their sixth game in 18 days.

Matip has only featured twice this season and missed the past four matches, while Keita has been absent for five games because of a muscle injury.

Centre-half Virgil van Dijk is expected to miss most of the season with a cruciate knee ligament injury, while stand-in defender Fabinho sustained a hamstring problem in the 2-0 home win against Danish side FC Midtjylland last week.

“We have, in the moment, more centre-halves available than we probably will line up together, which is good,” added Klopp.

MATCH FACTS

Atalanta

  • Atalanta are set to face their third different English opponent, having previously met Everton in the 2017-18 Europa League (played two, won two) and Manchester City in the Champions League last season (played two, drew one, lost one).
  • Since losing their first three group-stage games in the Champions League last season, Atalanta have gone unbeaten in their past five group-stage games in the competition (won three, drew two), including both this season (won one, drew one).
  • Excluding qualifiers, Atalanta have only failed to score in one of their past 19 games in major European competition (4-0 v Dinamo Zagreb last season), while they have averaged 2.1 goals per game over the course of this run (40 goals in total).
  • Duvan Zapata has been directly involved in six goals in five Champions League starts for Atalanta (four goals and two assists), while he scored twice in their 2-2 draw against Ajax on matchday two.

Liverpool

  • Liverpool have lost all three of their away Champions League matches in Italy under manager Jurgen Klopp, losing to Roma in May 2018 and Napoli in October 2018 and September 2019.
  • Liverpool have won each of their past three away games in the Champions League group stage, after losing four in
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As the Virus Rages, Some Are Convinced It’s Too Late to Stop It

COEUR d’ALENE, Idaho — The congregation of Candlelight Christian Fellowship gathered around tables in the church sanctuary one night last week to sip coffee and grapple with theological questions. From down the hall came the laughter of dozens of children at play.

With a potluck dinner, no masks and plenty of shared hugs, the night felt like a throwback to the pre-pandemic era except for a noticeable exception on the stage: The lead pastor, Paul Van Noy, was addressing the congregation with the aid of supplemental oxygen, piped into his nostrils from a small tank.

About a month ago, Mr. Van Noy, 60, was discharged from a hospital in a wheelchair after a Covid-19 infection brought him to the brink of death. But while that scare ravaged his lungs and rattled the church, it has done little to alter the growing sentiment among many people in northern Idaho that the coronavirus cannot be stopped and efforts to contain it are doing more harm than good.

“I think we just open up and we just let it take its course,” said Nancy Hillberg, 68, as church members mingled after the service. “Just let it be done.”

Amid a record spike of coronavirus cases and the final days of the presidential election, President Trump and his administration have expressed increasing helplessness at containing the virus, focusing instead on improvements in survivability and trying to hold the economy together. While it is a theme welcomed by many of the president’s supporters, it has proved alarming to health officials, including those at the hospital that cared for Mr. Van Noy, who are encountering rising resistance to their calls for unity in combating a pandemic that has already claimed nearly 230,000 Americans and threatens to take many more.

In northern Idaho, which is facing record cases and hospitalizations, the local health board last month repealed a requirement that people wear masks in Kootenai County, where Candlelight Christian Fellowship is.

“I personally do not care whether anybody wears a mask or not,” Walt Kirby, a member of the board, said at a public hearing on the issue. “If they want to be dumb enough to walk around out there and expose themselves and others to this, that’s fine with me.

“I’m just sitting back and watching them catch it and die. Hopefully I’ll live through it.”

In an interview later, Mr. Kirby said that he initially supported the mask mandate as a strategy to contain the virus and that, at age 90, he wears one whenever he is out in public.

But the mask requirement resulted in immense backlash, he said, in a part of the country where many people moved to escape what they see as an overbearing government.

Governors around the country, particularly Republican ones, are following the president’s lead in resisting new restrictions against a virus that has powerfully persisted despite lockdowns in some areas over the spring and summer.

Gov. Kristi Noem of South Dakota wrote that “there is no way

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Doping Tests Are Returning, but It Might Be Too Late

Tygart said he saw all of this as something of victory, since studies of doping prevalence from the past decade have recorded anonymous admissions of guilt from as many as 40 percent of respondents.

While the athletes in the USADA study admitted to far lower levels of doping, they expressed deep skepticism that their rivals were abiding by the rules. More than 50 percent said they believed international athletes had used the lull in testing caused by the pandemic as a doping opportunity, and 30 percent said they suspected American athletes had done so.

“Without testing, the confidence in the system goes way down,” Tygart said.

And the temptation remains. Just 42 percent of those surveyed said integrity in sports was more important than financial gain.

James Fitzgerald, a spokesman for the World Antidoping Agency, said testing numbers had been on the rise since May, though they still remain far behind last year’s figures, in part because so many competitions, where a lot of testing occurs, had been canceled. . In September, 17,643 tests were conducted, compared with 26,638 during that month in 2019.

Fitzgerald said national and regional antidoping organizations were doing their best while adhering to limits the local health authorities have placed on their activities. But he added that WADA does have other tools.

“While testing is important as a means to catch cheats and as a deterrent, it is not the only strategy available,” Fitzgerald said. “There are other angles of attack being pursued, which include intelligence and investigations, technology and research, sample storage and re-analysis, and the Athlete Biological Passport,” which can track dramatic changes in blood and hormone levels over time.

The damage to sporting integrity, though, may be done already. Studies have shown that even one cycle of performance-enhancing drugs that quickly leave the body can produce benefits that last as long as four years. That would certainly make a cycle that took place last spring beneficial at the Olympics next summer, or the Winter Games in Beijing in February 2022.

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Late pilot of downed aircraft was longtime dentist in Dyer, Chicago Heights | Latest Headlines



Plane Crash 394 MAIN

An aerial shot provided by NBC 5 Chicago shows a portion of the crash site on Illinois 394. The plane is in a wooded area and the tail is slightly visible at the top middle of the photo. 




Lawrence Jagmin, the pilot who died after crashing a plane Tuesday in Ford Heights, is remembered by some as a dearly beloved friend and family member.

To others, he was Dr. Jagmin, DDS — a dentist of more than 40 years in the Chicagoland area.

Jagmin, a 70-year-old Frankfort resident, practiced dentistry alongside his brother, Dr. Gary Jagmin, DDS, in Dyer and Chicago heights, Jagmin Dental of Indiana confirmed.

The brothers first opened their practice in 1977 in Chicago Heights after graduating from the University of Illinois College of Dentistry. In 2006, they opened their Dyer office, where Gary Jagmin primarily practiced, Jagmin Dental’s website shows.

Multiple attempts to reach the Jagmins’ family were unsuccessful.

Ken Brodnick, a friend of Lawrence Jagmin, told NBC 5 Chicago, a news partner of The Times, the late 70-year-old was “an awesome dentist” and “a fervent aircraft enthusiast,” adding that Jagmin had a profound impact on his life.

“He was a straight-up class-A fellow,” Brodnick told NBC 5.

“Larry Jagmin was one of the most unique individuals I know,” Larry Heidemann, Jagmin’s neighbor of about 20 years, told NBC 5. Heidemann described Jagmin as a man of many skills and talents, a Harley-Davidson enthusiast and “a unique individual and an outstanding neighbor,” NBC 5 reported.

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University of Toronto does too little, too late as staff, students contract COVID-19

TORONTO, Oct. 20, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — COVID-19 outbreaks at the University of Toronto highlight another missed chance to protect students and staff; Staff Union CUPE 3902 demands they do better. The University announced that as of October 10, 2020 it would limit access to on-campus activities but continues to require in-person instruction for some courses. As predicted, the protections came too late as COVID-19 outbreaks came to a head that same week among staff and students.

The announcement required all campus gyms and fitness centres to close, food services to shift to takeout-only, and for all “social gatherings and organized public events” to be subject to new limits of 10 people indoors and 25 people outdoors. The University also asked its principals and deans to “review” other “in-person activities, including instruction.” The Faculty of Arts & Science (the largest faculty on campus) announced on October 10, 2020 that all classes in the Faculty currently offered via hybrid dual delivery mode (with both online sections and in-person sections) would move completely online for the remainder of the fall semester. Disappointingly, classes offered in-person only have continued to be offered in the same manner. On October 13, 2020, after a number of predictable on-campus outbreaks, CUPE 3902 was advised that the University was finally ‘moving toward’ required screening for students and staff.

“Our members are already paying the price of U of T’s irresponsible attitude. Predictable COVID-19 outbreaks are happening on campus and we hold the University of Toronto responsible. It’s completely unacceptable,” says Amy Conwell, chair of Staff Union CUPE 3902. The union represents more than 10,000 contract academic workers at the University of Toronto. “To add insult to injury, U of T isn’t disclosing the real number of COVID-19 cases related to recent on-campus outbreaks. Canada’s top university needs to listen to its own world-class faculty if it wants to do better than the D-grade it received on its Fall reopening plan,” continues Conwell.

As early as July, CUPE 3902 and a coalition of other campus Unions including UTFA called for fall term classes to be offered online-only in anticipation of the second wave of COVID-19 cases currently sweeping the province. The University’s own expert epidemiologists agreed, noting that the University’s plan to hold in-person classes ignored the danger posed by aerosol transmission of COVID-19 and suggesting the University adopt reopening plans in line with those of other Ontario universities that went entirely or mostly online.

The University refused to meet with the coalition to discuss reopening plans despite public calls to do so from more than twenty professors of epidemiology, occupational and environmental health, global health, indigenous health, and social and behavioural health science. Staff unions requested that U of T establish proactive mandatory screening, on-campus testing, centralized contact logs, and take the Fall semester completely online. Instead, the University launched UCheck in September, a U of T branded voluntary self-assessment tool that pulls together widely known public health guidance.

Similarly, the University has taken the

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U.S. reports highest number of new coronavirus case since late July as total climbs above 8 million

  • The United States reported more than 69,000 new coronavirus cases on Friday, bringing the country’s total count to over 8 million reported cases, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.
  • The last time the U.S. reported a daily count that high was in late July as the coronavirus swept through Sun Belt states.
  • The surge in cases comes as infectious disease experts warn the U.S. could face a “substantial third wave” of infections this winter.



Melissa Leaston Director of nursing at Whittier Street Health Center swabs Steve Rose of Boston at a COVID testing site in Nubian Square on October 15, 2020 in Roxbury, Massachusetts.


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Melissa Leaston Director of nursing at Whittier Street Health Center swabs Steve Rose of Boston at a COVID testing site in Nubian Square on October 15, 2020 in Roxbury, Massachusetts.

The United States reported more than 69,000 new coronavirus cases on Friday, the highest daily count the nation has reported since late July.

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The U.S. has now reported more than 8 million Covid-19 cases and at least 218,600 deaths since the beginning of the pandemic, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

The surge in coronavirus cases comes as infectious disease experts warn the U.S. could face a “substantial third wave” of infections that will be further complicated this winter by the spread of seasonal influenza, which causes many similar symptoms to that of the coronavirus.

As colder temperatures arrive in the Northern Hemisphere, more people will spend time indoors and likely fail to follow public health guidance, which creates a greater risk for the cornoavirus’ spread compared with outdoor activities, Dr. William Schaffner, an epidemiologist at Vanderbilt University, said.

The U.S. is averaging roughly 55,000 new coronavirus cases every day, based on a weekly average to smooth out the reporting, a more than 16% increase compared with a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of Johns Hopkins data. New cases were growing by 5% or more in 38 states as the number of infections in the Midwest continues to surge.



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“We need to pay more attention to this. We seem to forget that we’re making progress, we’re doing better, and then we kind of let go and we go back again,” Dr. Carlos del Rio, a professor at the Emory University School of Medicine who specializes in infectious diseases, told CNBC on Friday.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert, has warned for weeks that the daily number of new cases has remained “unacceptably high” heading into the end of the year. However, it’s not too late to “vigorously apply” recommended public health measures, such as wearing a mask and maintaining a physical distance from others, Fauci told Johns Hopkins University on Thursday.

When the U.S. descended from its first peak in April, the number of new coronavirus cases “got stuck” around 20,000 per day, Fauci said. Ideally, the U.S. would’ve reported less than 10,000 cases every day, he said.

Then cases resurged. The number of daily new Covid-19 cases swelled to a high of nearly 70,000 cases a day before subsiding once again. However, new cases have since

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Pfizer says earliest U.S. filing for COVID-19 vaccine would be late November

(Reuters) – Pfizer Inc PFE.N said on Friday it could file in late November for U.S. authorization of the COVID-19 vaccine it is developing, suggesting that a vaccine could potentially be available in the United States by the end of the year.

That timeline makes it unlikely, however, that a vaccine will be available before the U.S. election, as President Donald Trump has promised. Pfizer, which is developing the vaccine with German partner BioNTech 22UAy.F, said that it may confirm if the vaccine is effective as soon as this month but that it also needs safety data from a 44,000-person clinical trial that will not be available until next month.

The Pfizer news, published in a letter from its chief executive on its website, lifted the U.S. stock market and the company’s shares. Shares fell slightly of rival vaccine maker Moderna Inc MRNA.O, which is close to Pfizer in its vaccine development.

“So let me be clear, assuming positive data, Pfizer will apply for Emergency Authorization Use in the U.S. soon after the safety milestone is achieved in the third week of November,” Pfizer Chief Executive Albert Bourla said, noting that he published the letter to provide greater clarity on the timeline for the vaccine.

People around the world are counting on a vaccine to control the spread of the coronavirus, which has killed more than a million people and ravaged the global economy.

Fears of delays were raised after trials for two rival vaccines were put on hold in the United States in recent weeks.

Trump has said repeatedly that there would be a vaccine available before the Nov. 3 election.

When asked about the Pfizer news, White House spokesman Judd Deere said, “The president continues to be optimistic that we will have one or more vaccines very soon, before the end of the year.”

The U.S. government’s Operation Warp Speed program has spent billions of dollars on development of vaccines and treatments. It has signed a deal to buy Pfizer vaccine shots if they work.

But the rush to develop a vaccine has raised concerns that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, acting in haste, might not conduct an adequate review.

U.S. health officials have sought to assuage those concerns. Earlier this month, the FDA formalized a requirement that the vaccine-makers collect two months of safety data on one-half of trial participants.

Pfizer has been trying to demonstrate that its decision-making is being driven by science rather than politics, Mizuho analyst Vamil Divan said.

“Just getting it to the market is only a small part of it,” Divan said. “People should actually be willing to take it.”

FILE PHOTO: The logo of U.S. pharmaceutical corporation Pfizer Inc. is seen at a branch in Zurich, Switzerland October 2, 2018. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann

Rival vaccine-maker Moderna could also apply for an emergency use authorization (EUA) this year. It has said that it may have interim data on its 30,000 person trial as soon as

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Pfizer says it will not have a coronavirus vaccine until late November, allaying fears of a rush for approval before Election Day

Chief executive Albert Bourla wrote in the letter that while the company projects it may have enough data to determine whether the vaccine is effective in October, there will not be sufficient safety follow-up to satisfy criteria laid out by the Food and Drug Administration until late November.

“A key point that I’d like to make clear is that effectiveness would satisfy only one of the three requirements and, alone, would not be enough for us to apply for approval for public use,” Bourla said. “Safety is, and will remain, our number one priority.”

The letter was welcomed by Eric Topol, a physician-scientist at Scripps Research Translational Institute who joined other experts in writing to Bourla in late September, asking the company not to seek authorization for a vaccine before late November. Topol recently had a virtual meeting with company executives to express his concerns and said he was frustrated they would not answer directly whether they would seek broader use of a vaccine before Nov. 3.

Bourla’s emphasis on having data in October “is what got many of us concerned, whether it was inadvertently playing into the political pressure or just because the incentives were aligned,” Topol said. “I thought [the letter] was very good. I wish it had been done potentially even earlier.”

Bourla made clear that while the company won’t seek approval until reaching the safety threshold, it could announce data on whether the vaccine candidate works before the election.

Pfizer’s trial will ultimately include 44,000 study subjects, with half receiving two shots of its experimental vaccine and the other half receiving placebo inoculations. Neither participants, study investigators nor company executives know who received a vaccine and who did not. But periodically throughout the trial, an independent committee is examining the data to see whether the vaccine is protecting participants from infection, as demonstrated by far fewer cases of covid-19, the disease caused by the virus, in those getting the shots than those receiving a placebo.

“In the spirit of candor, we will share any conclusive readout (positive or negative) with the public as soon as practical, usually a few days after the independent scientists notify us,” Bourla wrote.

The FDA in October issued guidance explaining the criteria for an emergency use authorization, saying a vaccine given to healthy people will be held to a higher standard than the typically low threshold that a medical product “may be effective” for emergency use. The agency put forth a requirement — despite White House objections — that vaccine candidates must have a minimum of two months of follow-up data on half of the participants in the study.

Pfizer will not have such data until the third week of November. Moderna, a biotechnology company, will not have enough safety data to apply for regulatory authorization until two days before Thanksgiving, according to spokesman Ray Jordan. Two other late-stage vaccine trials, from AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson, are paused because of potential safety concerns and have previously predicted readouts from their

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MoCo Sees Greatest One-Day Rise In COVID Cases Since Late July

SILVER SPRING, MD — Montgomery County has recorded its greatest one-day increase in COVID-19 cases since the end of July, according to figures released Friday by the Maryland Department of Health.

Officials say there have been 159 new cases in the past 24 hours, pushing the total number of infections in the county to 24,174.

There have been nine triple-digit increases in confirmed cases within the last four weeks, county coronavirus data shows. Health officials say the county — which, unlike most parts of Maryland — is still in phase two of its reopening plan — needs to achieve low and medium levels of transmission, or 10 to 35 cases a day, to move forward.

But over the last three months, daily COVID-19 cases have hovered between 47 and 171. And for the first time since Aug. 2, the number of cases per 100,000 residents rose above 10. That’s the threshold at which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers a region to be at high risk for coronavirus transmission.

The recent uptick in cases is giving health officials pause.

During a meeting with reporters on Thursday, the county’s head of emergency management, Dr. Earl Stoddard, said the county pumped the brakes on issuing an amended executive order that would lift restrictions on escape rooms, live performances, and youth sports activities.

Stoddard said the current numbers do not necessitate reimposing phase two restrictions — at least just yet. But if there’s still an uptick in the coming weeks, he added, officials “would be having much more serious conversations” about rollbacks.

Unlike case totals, the number of people dying daily from COVID-19 has been between zero and five in recent months.

On Friday, the county did not record any new deaths linked to the respiratory disease. The death toll stands at 820.

There are, however, another 40 people that health officials believe had the disease but died before ever getting tested. For now, they are considered “probable deaths” — and won’t be added to the official fatality count until they are confirmed by a laboratory test.

Montgomery County continues to have highest number of deaths in the state. It also has the second highest number of confirmed cases, after Prince George’s County, which has 31,210, according to the latest figures.

Across Maryland, there have been 134,329 cases, 3,887 confirmed deaths, and 145 “probable deaths.” Of the 416 people that are currently hospitalized, 111 are in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU).

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This article originally appeared on the Silver Spring Patch

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Pfizer says COVID-19 vaccine could be ready by late November

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla said in an open letter on Friday that his company could apply for emergency federal approval of its coronavirus vaccine as soon as late November, noting that the drugmaker expects to have enough data on the treatment’s safety and efficacy by then. That marks the first time a vaccine developer has specified when a vaccine might be available.

“Assuming positive data, Pfizer will apply for Emergency Authorization Use in the U.S. soon after the safety milestone is achieved in the third week of November,” Bourla wrote in the letter. The Food and Drug Administration is in charge of reviewing and approving requests for emergency use.

He added, “All the data contained in our U.S. application would be reviewed not only by the FDA’s own scientists but also by an external panel of independent experts at a publicly held meeting convened by the agency.”


COVID-19 treatment trials halted over safety …

02:17

Thirty-seven states are seeing a rise in average new coronavirus cases; only one state — South Carolina — is down. At the same time, two vaccine developers have paused their trials due to safety concerns, with drugmaker Eli Lilly halting human testing and Johnson & Johnson pausing its trial this week due to a sick participant. 

Pfizer’s guidance that it could apply for emergency use authorization by the end of November is a setback to President Donald Trump, who has asserted that a vaccine could be ready by election day on November 3.

“There is a great deal of confusion regarding exactly what it will take to ensure its development and approval,” Bourla said in the letter. 

Pfizer, which is developing the vaccine with BioNTech, must demonstrate that the treatment is effective in preventing COVID-19 in “at least a majority of vaccinated patients,” he noted. Next, the vaccine must be shown to be safe. Lastly, the company must demonstrate it can manufacture the vaccine consistently “at the highest quality standards,” Bourla said.

Pfizer earlier this year signed a $1.9 billion pact to provide the U.S. government with 100 million doses of a COVID-19 vaccine. Americans would receive the vaccine for free, the pharmaceutical company said. The deal for the vaccine includes the right to purchase up to an additional 500 million doses.

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