OKC Dentist Working With On-Site Lab to Bring Patients Best in Cosmetic Dentistry

OKLAHOMA CITY, Dec. 2, 2020 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — Providing the highest quality, longest lasting and most honest dentistry available has been a commitment of OKC dentist Dr. Chris Saxon’s since he began practicing dentistry. He is keeping this commitment by providing his patients with an on-site dental lab. This allows Dr. Saxon and his team at Saxon Dentistry to work hand in hand with the lab specialists to ensure an outstanding level of quality and service.

The Saxon Dentistry Difference

In most practices, the standard procedure is to outsource your dental lab needs. These typically include dentures, dental crowns, porcelain veneers, implant restorations and more. While convenient and often less expensive for dentists, quality and precision are often compromised. With Saxon Dentistry, this is kept on-site, ensuring greater quality control, accuracy of fit and most importantly, higher patient satisfaction.

When patients embark on full smile makeovers, dental implants, porcelain veneers and even a single crown, they are putting a lot of trust in their dentist. This trust is not taken lightly at Saxon Dentistry. The on-site lab utilizes top tier dental materials, advanced technology and employs skilled, meticulous technicians. Combining this with Dr. Saxon’s expertise allows for predictable, high quality outcomes.

When teaming up with the on-site dental lab specialist, Dr. Saxon can bring them directly into the room with the patient and together listen to the patient’s concerns. Without an on-site lab, dentists have to relay information to their labs via phone call or email. Details get lost in translation, and details matter greatly when customizing a smile for patients. Sometimes the most minor adjustment can have the biggest impact.

Smile Makeovers OKC

Dr. Saxon has a particular passion for making dentistry beautiful and natural. His keen eye for detail can make any dental restoration, from a single cracked tooth repair to dental veneers to full mouth dental implants, blend seamlessly into a smile. This has made him a highly sought after OKC cosmetic dentist and implant dentist.

“When dentistry is done to the highest level, no one should be able to detect that you’ve had dental work completed.”

He believes in meeting patients exactly where they are in life, understanding their goals and setting forth the appropriate treatment from there. There is no one size fits all dentistry in his office. Personalized care is not only necessary; it’s what every patient deserves that walks through a dentist’s door.

Get to Know Oklahoma City Native, Dr. Chris Saxon

Dr. Saxon is a native of Oklahoma City and a graduate of Putnam City North high school. He received his doctorate from the University of Oklahoma College Of Dentistry. He takes between 100-150 hours of continuing education every year, far exceeding the Oklahoma Board of Dentistry’s requirements.

Dr. Saxon is committed to giving back to the local community. One way he does this is by being an Oklahoma Mission of Mercy participant. Dr. Saxon is an avid golfer, cyclist and kite boarder, but his greatest joy comes from spending time with

Read more

Rockville Lab Can Resume COVID-19 Testing Following Investigation

ROCKVILLE, MD — The Rockville lab ordered by the state to stop processing COVID-19 tests following an investigation into its protocols has been cleared to resume testing, the company announced Wednesday.

“I am pleased that AdvaGenix is approved to resume COVID-19 testing by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the Maryland Department of Health,” said AdvaGenix owner Dr. William Kearns. “AdvaGenix has confirmed the integrity of the specimens and accuracy of the tests we’ve conducted.”

AdvaGenix, once the largest supplier of COVID-19 tests for Montgomery County, had to halt testing after state and federal officials visited the lab in August and found deficient practices.

Health officials did not go into specifics but said investigators found “improper laboratory and COVID-19 testing procedures that endanger patient health, safety, and welfare.”

Montgomery County cut ties with the lab shortly thereafter.

Kearns disputed the investigation, saying that the tests were safe and accurate — and that the issues investigators found had to do with a “pre-analytical temperature stability study.”

Before being ordered to stop, AdvaGenix had processed more than 19,000 tests — or roughly 8 percent of the total testing provided to county residents.

After cutting ties with AdvaGenix, the county inked a deal with CIAN Diagnostic Laboratories in Frederick.

Dr. Travis Gayles, the county’s top health official, said the county recently had a conversation with AdvaGenix about its services.

“At this time, based upon our current needs, we have the (testing) capacity but, consistent with what we’ve always said, we continue to explore new partnerships, particularly if there are new opportunities for new technology to integrate into the systems that we have,” he said. “So that’s where we currently stand with AdvaGenix, as well as with other companies that could potentially be able to meet those needs as they arise in the future.”

The county is consistently meeting its goal to test 5 percent of its population per month.

SEE ALSO:

This article originally appeared on the Rockville Patch

Source Article

Read more

Local Teens Help Solve Flint’s Water Crisis with New Lab and Water Testing: ‘It Gives Me Hope’

Flint Community Lab

During the summer of 2014, thousands of people in the close-knit, industrial city of Flint, Michigan — “Flintstoners,” as they proudly call themselves — saw their lives change in an instant.

In an effort to save money, the city switched its water supply from the Detroit River to the Flint River. Residents immediately complained about the water’s smell and taste and reported worrying symptoms including hair loss, rashes, and seizures.

Tests ordered in August revealed E. coli was in Flint’s water, and parts of the city were ordered to boil the water before drinking it. Elected officials denied for over a year that the city’s water was also contaminated with lead, but they finally acknowledged that the water wasn’t safe in September 2015.

The crisis is still fresh in the minds of many residents who continue to experience long-term health effects and are wary of their water.

Now, a group of local high school and college students is hoping to restore trust in the water system among their neighbors through the new McKenzie Patrice Croom Flint Community Lab, also known as the Flint Community Water Lab. For the next three years, they will work alongside chemists from the University of Michigan to test the water in more than 20,000 Flint homes and share the results.

RELATED: How Sick Are the Kids in Flint? Inside the Shocking Health Effects of the Devastating Water Crisis

The lab began as a pilot program in 2018 between the Flint Development Center and regional non-profit organization Freshwater Future and officially opened last month with the support of donors, including the University of Michigan, Thermo Fisher Scientific and The Nalgene Water Fund.

Markeysa Peterson, 17, tells PEOPLE she joined the lab to help people struggling in the wake of the crisis. Her nephew Curtis was diagnosed with autism due to lead contamination.

“We have to go through the everyday struggle of teaching him how to develop and function,” she says. “The crisis has made me a bit mentally distraught — everybody in Flint is struggling because we don’t have the attention or support that we deserve.”

In August, Michigan announced that it would pay $600 million to the victims of the Flint Water Crisis, but some residents say money doesn’t solve leftover issues from the crisis.

“Everything from the water plant to our tap needs to be completed replaced in order for us to feel safe,” says Carma Lewis, who has spent most of her life in Flint. “We’re sending our babies into these old school buildings where they still don’t have safe water and they’re using bottled water.”

For more on the Flint Community Water Lab, pick up the latest issue of PEOPLE or subscribe here.

Flint Community Lab Flint Community Lab

Lewis points out that having local teens and leaders running the lab is especially important to her, and she plans on getting her water tested regularly.

“It gives me hope,” she says. “I have more faith in kids

Read more

Lab under investigation as New Mexico deals with virus surge

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham is scheduled Tuesday to provide an update on COVID-19 cases after a string of record-breaking daily case counts prompted more restrictions last week and officials continue to crack down on employers who they say aren’t following the rules.

The state’s Occupational Health and Safety Bureau has opened an investigation of Sandia National Laboratories after receiving a complaint about alleged violations of the state public health order.

A letter sent Monday by the bureau and obtained by The Associated Press alleges that the national laboratory failed to comply with the health order by not limiting operations to remote work to the greatest extent practicable to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The state claims employees were ordered to cease telework and report to work in-person.

The state is requiring the lab to inform all employees and contractors of the investigation. The lab also has been ordered to complete an internal investigation to identify the root cause of COVID-19 cases that occurred in the last two weeks for each employee and contractor who tested positive.

If the lab doesn’t comply, the state says it’s authorized to post a notice of imminent danger on lab property and assess civil penalties up to $134,904 per violation.


“It is clear that neither federal (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) nor the (U.S. Department of Energy) are effectively holding Sandia National Laboratories accountable for protecting its employees from occupational exposure of COVID-19,” the letter states.

Lab spokeswoman Kristen Meub said Sandia’s top priority is to keep employees safe and healthy and that stringent safety measures have been implemented during the pandemic. She said Sandia is coordinating with the Energy Department and National Nuclear Security Administration to respond to the state in a timely manner.

“From the start of the pandemic through Oct. 15, the majority of Sandia COVID cases were acquired offsite and outside work hours,” Meub said. “As a result of our protective measures, such as safety protocols onsite, contact tracing has confirmed the vast majority of cases among Sandia employees was caused by community spread transmission away from the worksite.”

More than 100 workers at Sandia locations in New Mexico and California have tested positive since the start of the pandemic. The lab has more than 14,000 workers, with more than 12,000 of those located in New Mexico.

While the majority of employees work from home, Sandia officials say the lab has essential work that must be performed onsite to meet national security responsibilities. For those workers, the lab provides personal protective materials such as masks and sanitizer and daily health checks are done before they’re allowed onsite.

The lab also provides onsite testing with results in less than 24 hours, contact tracing, increased cleaning and disinfecting and other measures per Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. Lab officials say Sandia’s protocols exceed the state requirements in many cases.

Despite having some of the strictest rules in the U.S., Lujan Grisham’s administration has been struggling

Read more

UK lab joins global network to compare coronavirus vaccine candidates

LONDON (Reuters) – A second British laboratory is joining a global lab network to assess data from potential coronavirus vaccines, set up by a major non-profit health emergencies group to establish the effectiveness of different vaccine candidates.

Earlier this month, the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) set up the network, allowing scientists and drugmakers to compare vaccines and speed up selection of the most effective shots.

Britain’s Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency said on Tuesday the National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC) was joining the scheme, and had received funding from CEPI to develop an international standard for the COVID-19 antibody.

That means the NIBSC will produce a sample of antibody with a defined amount of biological activity that can be used by regulators and vaccine makers to calibrate their tests.

“This is an important initiative providing a service to vaccine developers globally and permits accurate evaluation of candidate vaccines for this pandemic,” Dr Mark Page, who is leading the work at NIBSC, said.

Public Health England is also involved in the CEPI scheme.

Hundreds of potential coronavirus vaccines are in various stages of development around the world, with shots developed in Russia and China already being deployed before full efficacy trials have been done, and front-runners from Pfizer <PFE.N>, Moderna <MRNA.O> and AstraZeneca <AZN.L> likely to have final-stage trial results before year-end.

CEPI itself is co-funding nine of the vaccines in development, including candidates from Moderna, AstraZeneca, Novavax <NVAX.O> and CureVac.

(Reporting by Alistair Smout; Editing by Mark Potter)

Source Article

Read more

One in four Americans believe coronavirus was engineered in Wuhan lab

  • Researchers surveyed people in five countries to assess which coronavirus-related conspiracy theories have taken root.
  • The most popular theory suggests the virus was “bioengineered in a laboratory in Wuhan.” Between 22% and 23% of Americans and Britons viewed that as “reliable.”
  • The study found that people who are older, numerically savvy, and trust scientists are less likely to fall for coronavirus misinformation.
  • Genetic evidence discredits the theory that the coronavirus was man-made.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Lingering uncertainty how the coronavirus pandemic started creates fertile territory for conspiracy theories.

About one in four Americans and Britons think the idea that the virus was engineered in a Wuhan laboratory is a “reliable” claim, according to a recent study, despite abundant scientific evidence to the contrary.

The research, published earlier this week in the journal Royal Society for Open Science, found that an even higher portion of respondents in Ireland and Spain — 26% and 33%, respectively — put stock in that theory, as do nearly 40% of survey participants in Mexico.

“Certain misinformation claims are consistently seen as reliable by substantial sections of the public,” Sander van der Linden, a co-author of the new study and a social psychologist at the University of Cambridge, said in a press release.

What’s more, people who found the lab conspiracy idea reliable were generally more hesitant about getting a coronavirus vaccine.

“We find a clear link between believing coronavirus conspiracies and hesitancy around any future vaccine,” van der Linden added.

People who trust scientists are less likely to fall for misinformation

covid vaccine turkey

Dr. Mustafa Gerek is vaccinated in volunteer in trials of a COVID-19 vaccine from China at Ankara City Hospital in Ankara, Turkey on October 13, 2020.

Aytac Unal/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images


The study authors sent an online survey to groups of 700 people in the US, Mexico, Ireland, and Spain, and to more than 1,000 people in the UK. They asked participants to rate how reliable certain statements about COVID-19 were on a scale of 1 to 7, and also asked about participants’ attitudes about a vaccine.

The researchers wanted to assess whether certain beliefs or demographics are correlated with how susceptible a person is to misinformation.

The results showed that respondents with “significantly and consistently” low levels of susceptibility to false information in all five countries also declared they trusted scientists and scored highly on a series of tasks designed to test their understanding of probability. Being older was linked to lower susceptibility to misinformation as well, in every country surveyed except Mexico.

Additionally, those who reported trusting their politicians to effectively tackle the crisis in Mexico, Spain, and the US were more likely to fall for conspiracy theories.

The study also found that respondents in Ireland, the UK, and the US who were exposed to coronavirus information on social media were more susceptible to misinformation.

Van der Linden’s team also found that as participants’ susceptibility increased, their intent to get vaccinated or recommend the vaccine to friends

Read more